Hello, my partner! Let's explore the mining machine together!

[email protected]

ball mill system

ball mill trunnion bearing lube system

ball mill trunnion bearing lube system

On a 11-6 x 22-0 Ball Mill, thetrunnion bearing lubrication system provides continuous low pressure flood oil for cooling and lubrication of the bearings, and high pressure oil for hydrostatic lift of the feed and discharge trunnions during start-up of the mill. System monitors including pressure switches and flow monitors are provided, along with temperature sensors that monitor the condition of the lube system. The signals from any of these monitors will alarm or trip the system depending on the deviation from the operating parameters.

The ball millslow pressure oil system pumps oil from the reservoir through a filter assembly to clean the oil before the flow is sent to the trunnion bearings. During start-up, the oil is also pumped to the high pressure pump. Dual cartridge filters, connected in parallel, continually clean the oil. The duplexconfiguration of the filters allows for uninterrupted operation of the mill during filter cartridge replacement and maintenance. Flow monitors in the trunnion bearing supply lines monitor oil flow to the bearings and will alarm and trip the mill is low flow is indicated.

The ball mills high pressure oil system is designed to lift the trunnions during start-up by supplying high pressure oil. The high pressure pump is programmed to shut-down after the mill has been running for a predetermined amount of time.The high pressure pump pumps oil through the high pressure supply lines to the trunnion bearings. Pressure transmitters in the high pressure oil supply lines monitor the supply of oil to the bearings and provide interlock signals for mill operation to the control system.

The breakaway pressure is influenced by the amount of residual oil present in the trunnion bearings. Pressure can vary by as much as 3000 psi (207 bar) between a dry bearing and a bearing that had just operated. Start-up may have to be delayed to allow the weight of the mill to squeeze out excessive oil and achieve enough back pressure to satisfy the PSH. PSH setpoint must be set between breakaway pressure and floating pressure.

The trunnion bearings have temperature sensor assemblies to monitor the operating temperature of the trunnions. The readings of the temperaturesensors are sent to the control system where they are monitored automatically. If the operating temperature exceeds the programmed alarmand trip levels, the mill will be shutdown automatically. It is difficult to predict the exact operating temperature of trunnion bearings. Experience has shown that each bearing stabilizes to its own temperature, ranging between 90F(32C) and 125F(52C). Many factors, such asambient temperature, quantity of oil, viscosity, bearing clearance, alignment, etc., contribute to the final operating temperature. If bearing temperatures do not stabilize after 5 hours of operation within this parameter, the mill must be shut down and corrective action taken.

The instrumentation must be calibrated before starting the mill. The easiest and safest way to adjust the instrumentation is to very carefully monitor all bearing temperatures during start-up and under normal grinding conditions. Adjust the individual set points for each bearing 10F(5.5C) higher than the stabilized temperature for alarm, and 15F(8C) for shut down.

Maintaining the ball mill charge and monitoring the feed rate will help to ensure maximum efficiency of the grinding system. System interlocks monitor the operating condition of the grinding mill and will shut down the mill if conditions deviate from operating parameters. Regular monitoring of the feed rate, ore hardness, mill power draw, mill charge volumes (charge weights), and periodic visual checks of the ball volume (with the charge ground out of the mill and the mill stopped) will give the trends of ball consumption per ton of material ground. With the information gathered per the above, a schedule of ball charge addition (quantity and intervals) can be established and maintained.

ball mills

ball mills

In all ore dressing and milling Operations, including flotation, cyanidation, gravity concentration, and amalgamation, the Working Principle is to crush and grind, often with rob mill & ball mills, the ore in order to liberate the minerals. In the chemical and process industries, grinding is an important step in preparing raw materials for subsequent treatment.In present day practice, ore is reduced to a size many times finer than can be obtained with crushers. Over a period of many years various fine grinding machines have been developed and used, but the ball mill has become standard due to its simplicity and low operating cost.

A ball millefficiently operated performs a wide variety of services. In small milling plants, where simplicity is most essential, it is not economical to use more than single stage crushing, because the Steel-Head Ball or Rod Mill will take up to 2 feed and grind it to the desired fineness. In larger plants where several stages of coarse and fine crushing are used, it is customary to crush from 1/2 to as fine as 8 mesh.

Many grinding circuits necessitate regrinding of concentrates or middling products to extremely fine sizes to liberate the closely associated minerals from each other. In these cases, the feed to the ball mill may be from 10 to 100 mesh or even finer.

Where the finished product does not have to be uniform, a ball mill may be operated in open circuit, but where the finished product must be uniform it is essential that the grinding mill be used in closed circuit with a screen, if a coarse product is desired, and with a classifier if a fine product is required. In most cases it is desirable to operate the grinding mill in closed circuit with a screen or classifier as higher efficiency and capacity are obtained. Often a mill using steel rods as the grinding medium is recommended, where the product must have the minimum amount of fines (rods give a more nearly uniform product).

Often a problem requires some study to determine the economic fineness to which a product can or should be ground. In this case the 911Equipment Company offers its complete testing service so that accurate grinding mill size may be determined.

Until recently many operators have believed that one particular type of grinding mill had greater efficiency and resulting capacity than some other type. However, it is now commonly agreed and accepted that the work done by any ballmill depends directly upon the power input; the maximum power input into any ball or rod mill depends upon weight of grinding charge, mill speed, and liner design.

The apparent difference in capacities between grinding mills (listed as being the same size) is due to the fact that there is no uniform method of designating the size of a mill, for example: a 5 x 5 Ball Mill has a working diameter of 5 inside the liners and has 20 per cent more capacity than all other ball mills designated as 5 x 5 where the shell is 5 inside diameter and the working diameter is only 48 with the liners in place.

Ball-Rod Mills, based on 4 liners and capacity varying as 2.6 power of mill diameter, on the 5 size give 20 per cent increased capacity; on the 4 size, 25 per cent; and on the 3 size, 28 per cent. This fact should be carefully kept in mind when determining the capacity of a Steel- Head Ball-Rod Mill, as this unit can carry a greater ball or rod charge and has potentially higher capacity in a given size when the full ball or rod charge is carried.

A mill shorter in length may be used if the grinding problem indicates a definite power input. This allows the alternative of greater capacity at a later date or a considerable saving in first cost with a shorter mill, if reserve capacity is not desired. The capacities of Ball-Rod Mills are considerably higher than many other types because the diameters are measured inside the liners.

The correct grinding mill depends so much upon the particular ore being treated and the product desired, that a mill must have maximum flexibility in length, type of grinding medium, type of discharge, and speed.With the Ball-Rod Mill it is possible to build this unit in exact accordance with your requirements, as illustrated.

To best serve your needs, the Trunnion can be furnished with small (standard), medium, or large diameter opening for each type of discharge. The sketch shows diagrammatic arrangements of the four different types of discharge for each size of trunnion opening, and peripheral discharge is described later.

Ball-Rod Mills of the grate discharge type are made by adding the improved type of grates to a standard Ball-Rod Mill. These grates are bolted to the discharge head in much the same manner as the standard headliners.

The grates are of alloy steel and are cast integral with the lifter bars which are essential to the efficient operation of this type of ball or rod mill. These lifter bars have a similar action to a pump:i. e., in lifting the product so as to discharge quickly through the mill trunnion.

These Discharge Grates also incorporate as an integral part, a liner between the lifters and steel head of the ball mill to prevent wear of the mill head. By combining these parts into a single casting, repairs and maintenance are greatly simplified. The center of the grate discharge end of this mill is open to permit adding of balls or for adding water to the mill through the discharge end.

Instead of being constructed of bars cast into a frame, Grates are cast entire and have cored holes which widen toward the outside of the mill similar to the taper in grizzly bars. The grate type discharge is illustrated.

The peripheral discharge type of Ball-Rod Mill is a modification of the grate type, and is recommended where a free gravity discharge is desired. It is particularly applicable when production of too many fine particles is detrimental and a quick pass through the mill is desired, and for dry grinding.

The drawings show the arrangement of the peripheral discharge. The discharge consists of openings in the shell into which bushings with holes of the desired size are inserted. On the outside of the mill, flanges are used to attach a stationary discharge hopper to prevent pulp splash or too much dust.

The mill may be operated either as a peripheral discharge or a combination or peripheral and trunnion discharge unit, depending on the desired operating conditions. If at any time the peripheral discharge is undesirable, plugs inserted into the bushings will convert the mill to a trunnion discharge type mill.

Unless otherwise specified, a hard iron liner is furnished. This liner is made of the best grade white iron and is most serviceable for the smaller size mills where large balls are not used. Hard iron liners have a much lower first cost.

Electric steel, although more expensive than hard iron, has advantage of minimum breakage and allows final wear to thinner section. Steel liners are recommended when the mills are for export or where the source of liner replacement is at a considerable distance.

Molychrome steel has longer wearing qualities and greater strength than hard iron. Breakage is not so apt to occur during shipment, and any size ball can be charged into a mill equipped with molychrome liners.

Manganese liners for Ball-Rod Mills are the world famous AMSCO Brand, and are the best obtainable. The first cost is the highest, but in most cases the cost per ton of ore ground is the lowest. These liners contain 12 to 14% manganese.

The feed and discharge trunnions are provided with cast iron or white iron throat liners. As these parts are not subjected to impact and must only withstand abrasion, alloys are not commonly used but can be supplied.

Gears for Ball-Rod Mills drives are furnished as standard on the discharge end of the mill where they are out of the way of the classifier return, scoop feeder, or original feed. Due to convertible type construction the mills can be furnished with gears on the feed end. Gear drives are available in two alternative combinations, which are:

All pinions are properly bored, key-seated, and pressed onto the steel countershaft, which is oversize and properly keyseated for the pinion and drive pulleys or sheaves. The countershaft operates on high grade, heavy duty, nickel babbitt bearings.

Any type of drive can be furnished for Ball-Rod Mills in accordance with your requirements. Belt drives are available with pulleys either plain or equipped with friction clutch. Various V- Rope combinations can also be supplied.

The most economical drive to use up to 50 H. P., is a high starting torque motor connected to the pinion shaft by means of a flat or V-Rope drive. For larger size motors the wound rotor (slip ring) is recommended due to its low current requirement in starting up the ball mill.

Should you be operating your own power plant or have D. C. current, please specify so that there will be no confusion as to motor characteristics. If switches are to be supplied, exact voltage to be used should be given.

Even though many ores require fine grinding for maximum recovery, most ores liberate a large percentage of the minerals during the first pass through the grinding unit. Thus, if the free minerals can be immediately removed from the ball mill classifier circuit, there is little chance for overgrinding.

This is actually what has happened wherever Mineral Jigs or Unit Flotation Cells have been installed in the ball mill classifier circuit. With the installation of one or both of these machines between the ball mill and classifier, as high as 70 per cent of the free gold and sulphide minerals can be immediately removed, thus reducing grinding costs and improving over-all recovery. The advantage of this method lies in the fact that heavy and usually valuable minerals, which otherwise would be ground finer because of their faster settling in the classifier and consequent return to the grinding mill, are removed from the circuit as soon as freed. This applies particularly to gold and lead ores.

Ball-Rod Mills have heavy rolled steel plate shells which are arc welded inside and outside to the steel heads or to rolled steel flanges, depending upon the type of mill. The double welding not only gives increased structural strength, but eliminates any possibility of leakage.

Where a single or double flanged shell is used, the faces are accurately machined and drilled to template to insure perfect fit and alignment with the holes in the head. These flanges are machined with male and female joints which take the shearing stresses off the bolts.

The Ball-Rod Mill Heads are oversize in section, heavily ribbed and are cast from electric furnace steel which has a strength of approximately four times that of cast iron. The head and trunnion bearings are designed to support a mill with length double its diameter. This extra strength, besides eliminating the possibility of head breakage or other structural failure (either while in transit or while in service), imparts to Ball-Rod Mills a flexibility heretofore lacking in grinding mills. Also, for instance, if you have a 5 x 5 mill, you can add another 5 shell length and thus get double the original capacity; or any length required up to a maximum of 12 total length.

On Type A mills the steel heads are double welded to the rolled steel shell. On type B and other flanged type mills the heads are machined with male and female joints to match the shell flanges, thus taking the shearing stresses from the heavy machine bolts which connect the shell flanges to the heads.

The manhole cover is protected from wear by heavy liners. An extended lip is provided for loosening the door with a crow-bar, and lifting handles are also provided. The manhole door is furnished with suitable gaskets to prevent leakage.

The mill trunnions are carried on heavy babbitt bearings which provide ample surface to insure low bearing pressure. If at any time the normal length is doubled to obtain increased capacity, these large trunnion bearings will easily support the additional load. Trunnion bearings are of the rigid type, as the perfect alignment of the trunnion surface on Ball-Rod Mills eliminates any need for the more expensive self-aligning type of bearing.

The cap on the upper half of the trunnion bearing is provided with a shroud which extends over the drip flange of the trunnion and effectively prevents the entrance of dirt or grit. The bearing has a large space for wool waste and lubricant and this is easily accessible through a large opening which is covered to prevent dirt from getting into the bearing.Ball and socket bearings can be furnished.

Scoop Feeders for Ball-Rod Mills are made in various radius sizes. Standard scoops are made of cast iron and for the 3 size a 13 or 19 feeder is supplied, for the 4 size a 30 or 36, for the 5 a 36 or 42, and for the 6 a 42 or 48 feeder. Welded steel scoop feeders can, however, be supplied in any radius.

The correct size of feeder depends upon the size of the classifier, and the smallest feeder should be used which will permit gravity flow for closed circuit grinding between classifier and the ball or rod mill. All feeders are built with a removable wearing lip which can be easily replaced and are designed to give minimum scoop wear.

A combination drum and scoop feeder can be supplied if necessary. This feeder is made of heavy steel plate and strongly welded. These drum-scoop feeders are available in the same sizes as the cast iron feeders but can be built in any radius. Scoop liners can be furnished.

The trunnions on Ball-Rod Mills are flanged and carefully machined so that scoops are held in place by large machine bolts and not cap screws or stud bolts. The feed trunnion flange is machined with a shoulder for insuring a proper fit for the feed scoop, and the weight of the scoop is carried on this shoulder so that all strain is removed from the bolts which hold the scoop.

High carbon steel rods are recommended, hot rolled, hot sawed or sheared, to a length of 2 less than actual length of mill taken inside the liners. The initial rod charge is generally a mixture ranging from 1.5 to 3 in diameter. During operation, rod make-up is generally the maximum size. The weights per lineal foot of rods of various diameters are approximately: 1.5 to 6 lbs.; 2-10.7 lbs.; 2.5-16.7 lbs.; and 3-24 lbs.

Forged from the best high carbon manganese steel, they are of the finest quality which can be produced and give long, satisfactory service. Data on ball charges for Ball-Rod Mills are listed in Table 5. Further information regarding grinding balls is included in Table 6.

Rod Mills has a very define and narrow discharge product size range. Feeding a Rod Mill finer rocks will greatly impact its tonnage while not significantly affect its discharge product sizes. The 3.5 diameter rod of a mill, can only grind so fine.

Crushers are well understood by most. Rod and Ball Mills not so much however as their size reduction actions are hidden in the tube (mill). As for Rod Mills, the image above best expresses what is going on inside. As rocks is feed into the mill, they are crushed (pinched) by the weight of its 3.5 x 16 rods at one end while the smaller particles migrate towards the discharge end and get slightly abraded (as in a Ball Mill) on the way there.

We haveSmall Ball Mills for sale coming in at very good prices. These ball mills are relatively small, bearing mounted on a steel frame. All ball mills are sold with motor, gears, steel liners and optional grinding media charge/load.

Ball Mills or Rod Mills in a complete range of sizes up to 10 diameter x20 long, offer features of operation and convertibility to meet your exactneeds. They may be used for pulverizing and either wet or dry grindingsystems. Mills are available in both light-duty and heavy-duty constructionto meet your specific requirements.

All Mills feature electric cast steel heads and heavy rolled steelplate shells. Self-aligning main trunnion bearings on large mills are sealedand internally flood-lubricated. Replaceable mill trunnions. Pinion shaftbearings are self-aligning, roller bearing type, enclosed in dust-tightcarrier. Adjustable, single-unit soleplate under trunnion and drive pinionsfor perfect, permanent gear alignment.

Ball Mills can be supplied with either ceramic or rubber linings for wet or dry grinding, for continuous or batch type operation, in sizes from 15 x 21 to 8 x 12. High density ceramic linings of uniform hardness male possible thinner linings and greater and more effective grinding volume. Mills are shipped with liners installed.

Complete laboratory testing service, mill and air classifier engineering and proven equipment make possible a single source for your complete dry-grinding mill installation. Units available with air swept design and centrifugal classifiers or with elevators and mechanical type air classifiers. All sizes and capacities of units. Laboratory-size air classifier also available.

A special purpose batch mill designed especially for grinding and mixing involving acids and corrosive materials. No corners mean easy cleaning and choice of rubber or ceramic linings make it corrosion resistant. Shape of mill and ball segregation gives preferential grinding action for grinding and mixing of pigments and catalysts. Made in 2, 3 and 4 diameter grinding drums.

Nowadays grinding mills are almost extensively used for comminution of materials ranging from 5 mm to 40 mm (3/161 5/8) down to varying product sizes. They have vast applications within different branches of industry such as for example the ore dressing, cement, lime, porcelain and chemical industries and can be designed for continuous as well as batch grinding.

Ball mills can be used for coarse grinding as described for the rod mill. They will, however, in that application produce more fines and tramp oversize and will in any case necessitate installation of effective classification.If finer grinding is wanted two or three stage grinding is advisable as for instant primary rod mill with 75100 mm (34) rods, secondary ball mill with 2540 mm(11) balls and possibly tertiary ball mill with 20 mm () balls or cylpebs.To obtain a close size distribution in the fine range the specific surface of the grinding media should be as high as possible. Thus as small balls as possible should be used in each stage.

The principal field of rod mill usage is the preparation of products in the 5 mm0.4 mm (4 mesh to 35 mesh) range. It may sometimes be recommended also for finer grinding. Within these limits a rod mill is usually superior to and more efficient than a ball mill. The basic principle for rod grinding is reduction by line contact between rods extending the full length of the mill, resulting in selective grinding carried out on the largest particle sizes. This results in a minimum production of extreme fines or slimes and more effective grinding work as compared with a ball mill. One stage rod mill grinding is therefore suitable for preparation of feed to gravimetric ore dressing methods, certain flotation processes with slime problems and magnetic cobbing. Rod mills are frequently used as primary mills to produce suitable feed to the second grinding stage. Rod mills have usually a length/diameter ratio of at least 1.4.

Tube mills are in principle to be considered as ball mills, the basic difference being that the length/diameter ratio is greater (35). They are commonly used for surface cleaning or scrubbing action and fine grinding in open circuit.

In some cases it is suitable to use screened fractions of the material as grinding media. Such mills are usually called pebble mills, but the working principle is the same as for ball mills. As the power input is approximately directly proportional to the volume weight of the grinding media, the power input for pebble mills is correspondingly smaller than for a ball mill.

A dry process requires usually dry grinding. If the feed is wet and sticky, it is often necessary to lower the moisture content below 1 %. Grinding in front of wet processes can be done wet or dry. In dry grinding the energy consumption is higher, but the wear of linings and charge is less than for wet grinding, especially when treating highly abrasive and corrosive material. When comparing the economy of wet and dry grinding, the different costs for the entire process must be considered.

An increase in the mill speed will give a directly proportional increase in mill power but there seems to be a square proportional increase in the wear. Rod mills generally operate within the range of 6075 % of critical speed in order to avoid excessive wear and tangled rods. Ball and pebble mills are usually operated at 7085 % of critical speed. For dry grinding the speed is usually somewhat lower.

The mill lining can be made of rubber or different types of steel (manganese or Ni-hard) with liner types according to the customers requirements. For special applications we can also supply porcelain, basalt and other linings.

The mill power is approximately directly proportional to the charge volume within the normal range. When calculating a mill 40 % charge volume is generally used. In pebble and ball mills quite often charge volumes close to 50 % are used. In a pebble mill the pebble consumption ranges from 315 % and the charge has to be controlled automatically to maintain uniform power consumption.

In all cases the net energy consumption per ton (kWh/ton) must be known either from previous experience or laboratory tests before mill size can be determined. The required mill net power P kW ( = ton/hX kWh/ton) is obtained from

Trunnions of S.G. iron or steel castings with machined flange and bearing seat incl. device for dismantling the bearings. For smaller mills the heads and trunnions are sometimes made in grey cast iron.

The mills can be used either for dry or wet, rod or ball grinding. By using a separate attachment the discharge end can be changed so that the mills can be used for peripheral instead of overflow discharge.

ball mill maintenance & installation procedure

ball mill maintenance & installation procedure

Am sure your BallMill is considered the finest possible grinding mill available. As such you will find it is designed and constructed according to heavy duty specifications. It is designed along sound engineering principles with quality workmanship and materials used in the construction of the component parts. YourBallMill reflects years of advancement in grinding principles, materials, and manufacturing techniques. It has been designed with both the operators and the erectors viewpoints in mind. Long uninterrupted performance can be expected from it if the instructions covering installation and maintenance of the mill are carried out. You may be familiar with installing mills of other designs and manufacture much lighter in construction. YourBallis heavy and rugged. It should, therefore, be treated accordingly with due respect for its heavier construction.

The purpose of this manual is to assist you in the proper installation and to acquaint you a bit further with the assembly and care of this equipment. We suggest that these instructions be read carefully and reviewed by everyone whenever involved in the actual installation and operation of the mill. In reading these general instructions, you may at times feel that they cover items which are elementary and perhaps not worthy of mention; however in studying hundreds of installations, it has been found that very often minor points are overlooked due to pressure being exerted by outside influences to get the job done in a hurry. The erection phase of this mill is actually no place to attempt cost savings by taking short cuts, or by-passing some of the work. A good installation will pay dividends for many years to come by reduced maintenance cost.With the modern practice of specialized skills and trades, there is often a line drawn between responsibilities of one crew of erectors and another. Actually the responsibility of installation does not cease with the completion of one phase nor does it begin with the starting of another. Perhaps a simple rule to adopt would be DO NOT TAKE ANYTHING FOR GRANTED. This policy of rechecking previously done work will help guarantee each step of the erection and it will carefully coordinate and tie it into subsequent erection work. To clarify or illustrate this point, take the example of concrete workers completing their job and turning it over to the machinist or millwright. The latter group should carefully check the foundation for soundness and correctness prior to starting their work.

Sound planning and good judgement will, to a great extent, be instrumental in avoiding many of the troublesome occurrences especially at the beginning of operations. While it is virtually impossible to anticipate every eventuality, nevertheless it is the intention of this manual to outline a general procedure to follow in erecting the mill, and at the same time, point out some of the pitfalls which should be avoided.

Before starting the erection of the mill, adequate handling facilities should be provided or made available, bearing in mind the weights and proportions of the various parts and sub-assemblies. This information can be ascertained from the drawings and shipping papers.

The gearing, bearings, and other machined surfaces have been coated with a protective compound, and should be cleaned thoroughly with a solvent, such as Chlorothene, (made by Dow Chemical). Judgement should be exercised as to the correct time and place for cleaning the various parts. Do not permit solvents, oil or grease to come in contact with the roughened top surfaces of the concrete foundation where grouting is to be applied; otherwise proper bonding will not result.

After cleaning the various parts, the gear and pinion teeth, trunnion journals and bearings, shafting and such, should be protected against rusting or pitting as well as against damage from falling objects or weld splatter. All burrs should be carefully removed by filing or honing.

Unless otherwise arranged for, the mill has been completely assembled in our shop. Before dismantling, the closely fitted parts were match marked, and it will greatly facilitate field assembly to adhere to these match marks.

The surfaces of all connecting joints or fits, such as shell and head flanges, trunnion flanges, trunnion liner and feeder connecting joints, should be coated with a NON-SETTING elastic compound, such as Quigley O-Seal, or Permatex to insure against leakage and to assist in drawing them up tight. DO NOT USE WHITE LEAD OR GREASE.

Parts which are affected by the hand of the mill are easily identified by referring to the parts list. In general they include the feeder, feed trunnion liner, discharge trunnion liner if it is equipped with a spiral, spiral type helical splitter, and in some cases the pan liners when they are of the spiral type. When both right and left hand mills are being assembled, it is imperative that these parts which involve hand be assembled in the correct mill.

Adequate foundations for any heavy equipment, and in particular grinding mills, are extremely important to assure proper operation. The foundation should preferably be in one piece, that is, with a reinforced slab footing (so called mat) extending under both trunnion bearing foundations as well as the pinion bearing foundation. If possible or practical, it should be extended to include also the motor and drive. With this design, in the event of some movement, the mill and foundation will tend to move as a unit. ANY SLIGHT SETTLING OF FOUNDATIONS WILL CAUSE BEARING AND GEAR MISALIGNMENT, resulting in excessive wear and higher maintenance costs. It has been found that concrete foundations on a weight basis should be at least 1 times the total weight of the grinding mill with its grinding media.

Allowable bearing pressure between concrete footings and the soil upon which the foundation rests should first be considered. The center of pressure must always pass through the center of the footing. Foundations subject to shock should be designed with less unit pressure than foundations for stationary loads. High moisture content in soils reduces the amount of allowable specific pressure that the ground can support. The following figures may be used for preliminary foundation calculations.

Portland cement mixed with sand and aggregate in the proper proportions has come to be standard practice in making concrete. For general reference cement is usually shipped in sacks containing one cubic foot of material. A barrel usually holds 4 cubic feet. Cement will deteriorate with age and will quickly absorb moisture so it should be stored in a dry place. For best results the sand and gravel used should be carefully cleaned free of humus, clay, vegetal matter, etc.

Concrete may be made up in different mixtures having different proportions of sand and aggregate. These are expressed in parts for example a 1:2:4 mixture indicates one bag of cement, 2 cubic feet of sand, and 4 cubic feet of gravel. We recommend a mixture of 1:2:3 for ball mill and rod mill foundations. The proper water to sand ratio should be carefully regulated since excess water increases the shrinkage in the concrete and lends to weaken it even more than a corresponding increase in the aggregate. Between 5 to 8 gallons of water to a sack of cement is usually recommended, the lower amount to be used where higher strength is required or where the concrete will be subject to severe weathering conditions.

Detailed dimensions for the concrete foundation are covered by the foundation plan drawing submitted separately. The drawing also carries special instructions as to the allowance for grouting, steel reinforcements, pier batter, foundation bolts and pipes. During concrete work, care should be taken to prevent concrete entering the pipes, surrounding the foundations bolts, which would limit the positioning of the bolts when erecting the various assemblies. Forms should be adequately constructed and reinforced to prevent swell, particularly where clearance is critical such as at the drive end where the gear should clear the trunnion bearing and pinion bearing piers.

For convenience in maintenance, the mill foundations should be equipped with jacking piers. These will allow the lifting of one end of the mill by use of jacks in the event maintenance must be carried out under these conditions.

Adequate foundations for any heavy equipment, and in particular Marcy grinding mills, are extremely important to assure proper operation of that equipment. Any slight settling of foundations will cause bearing and gear misalignment, resulting in excessive wear and higher maintenance costs. It has been found that concrete foundations on a weight basis should be approximately 1 times the total weight of the grinding mill with its grinding media.

Allowable bearing pressure between concrete footings and the soil upon which the foundation rests should first be considered. The center of pressure must always pass through the center of the footing. Foundations subject to shock should be designed with less unit pressures than foundations for stationary loads. High moisture content in soils reduces the amount of allowable pressure that that material can support. The following figures may be used for quick foundation calculations:

Portland cement mixed with sand and aggregate in the proper proportions has come to be standard practice in making concrete. For general reference cement is usually shipped in sacks containing one cubic foot of material. A barrel usually consists of 4 cubic feet. Cement will deteriorate with age and will quickly absorb moisture so it should be stored in a cool, dry place. The sand and gravel used should be carefully cleaned for best results to be sure of minimizing the amount of sedimentation in that material.

Concrete may be made up in different mixtures having different proportions of sand and aggregate. These are expressed in parts for example a 1:2:4 mixture indicates one bag of cement, 2 cubic feet of sand, and 4 cubic feet of gravel. We recommend a mixture of 1:2:3 for ball mill and rod mill foundations. The proper water to sand ratio should be carefully regulated since excess water will tend to weaken the concrete even more than corresponding variations in other material ratios. Between 5 to 8 gallons of water to a sack of cement is usually recommended, the lower amount to be used where higher strength is required or where the concrete will be subject to severe weathering conditions.

We recommend the use of a non-shrinking grout, and preferably of the pre-mixed type, such as Embeco, made by the Master Builders Company of Cleveland, Ohio. Thoroughly clean the top surfaces of the concrete piers, and comply with the instructions of the grouting supplier.

1. Establish vertical and horizontal centerline of mill and pinion shaftagainst the effects of this, we recommend that the trunnion bearing sole plate be crowned so as to be higher at the center line of the mill. This is done by using a higher shim at the center than at the endsand tightening the foundation bolts of both ends.

After all shimming is completed, the sole plate and bases should be grouted in position. Grouting should be well tamped and should completely fill the underside of the sole plate and bases. DO NOT REMOVE THE SHIMS AFTER OR DURING GROUTING. When the grout has hardened sufficiently it is advisable to paint the top surfaces of the concrete so as to protect it against disintegration due to the absorption of oil or grease.

If it is felt that sufficient accuracy in level between trunnion bearing piers cannot be maintained, we recommend that the grouting of the sole plate under the trunnion bearing opposite the gear end be delayed until after the mill is in place. In this way, the adjustment by shimming at this end can be made later to correct for any errors in elevation. Depending on local climatic conditions, two to seven days should he allowed for the grouting to dry and set, before painting or applying further loads to the piers.

Pinion bearings are provided of either the sleeve type or anti-friction type. Twin bearing construction may use either individual sole plates or a cast common sole plate. The unit with a common sole plate is completely assembled in our shop and is ready for installation. Normal inspection and cleaning procedure should be followed. Refer to the parts list for general assembly. These units are to be permanently grouted in position and, therefore, care should be taken to assure correct alignment.

The trunnion bearing assemblies can now be mounted on their sole plates. If the bearings are of the swivel type, a heavy industrial water-proof grease should be applied to the spherical surfaces of both the swivels and the bases. Move the trunnion bearings to their approximate position by adjustment of the set screws provided for this purpose.

In the case of ball mills, all internal wearing parts will pass through the manhole, whereas in the case of open end rod mills they will pass through the discharge trunnion opening. When lining the shell, start with the odd shaped pieces around the manhole opening if manholes are furnished. Rubber shell liner backing should be used with all cast type rod mills shell liners. If the shell liners are of the step type, they should be assembled with the thin portion, or toe, as the leading edge with respect to rotation of the mill.

Lorain liners for the shell are provided with special round head bolts, with a waterproof washer and nut. All other cast type liners for the head and shell are provided with oval head bolts with a cut washer and nuts. Except when water proof washers are used, it is advisable to wrap four or five turns of candle wicking around the shank of the bolt under the cut washer. Dip the candle wicking in white lead. All liner bolt threads should be dipped in graphite and oil before assembly. All liner bolt cuts should be firmly tightened by use of a pipe extension on a wrench, or better yet, by use of a torque wrench. The bolt heads should be driven firmly into the bolt holes with a hammer.

In order to minimise the effect of pulp race, we recommend that the spaces between the ends of the shell liners and the head liners or grates be filled with suitable packing. This packing may be in the form of rubber belting, hose, rope or wood.

If adequate overhead crane facilities are available, the heads can be assembled to the shell with the flange connecting bolts drawn tightly. Furthermore, the liners can be in place, as stated above, and the gear can be mounted, as covered by separate instructions. Then the mill can be taken to its location and set in place in the trunnion bearings.

If on the other hand the handling facilities are limited it is recommended that the bare shell and heads be assembled together in a slightly higher position than normal. After the flange bolts are tightened, the mill proper should be lowered into position. Other intermediate methods may be used, depending on local conditions.

In any event, just prior to the lowering of the mill into the bearings the trunnion journal and bushing and bases should be thoroughly cleaned and greased. Care should be taken not to foul the teeth in the gear or pinion. Trunnion bearing caps should be immediately installed, although not necessarily tightened, to prevent dirt settling on the trunnions. The gear should be at least tentatively covered for protection.

IMPORTANT. Unless the millwright or operator is familiar with this type of seal, there is a tendency to assume that the oil seal is too long because of its appearance when held firmly around the trunnion. It is not the function of the brass oil seal band to provide tension for effective sealing. This is accomplished by the garter spring which is provided with the oil seal.

Assemble the oil seal with the spring in place, and with the split at the top. Encircle the oil seal with the band, keeping the blocks on the side of the bearing at or near the horizontal center line so that when in place they will fit between the two dowel pins on the bearing, which are used to prevent rotation of the seal.

Moderately tighten up the cap screws at the blocks, pulling them together to thus hold the seal with its spring in place. If the blocks cannot be pulled snuggly together, then the oil seal may be cut accordingly. Oil the trunnion surface and slide the entire seal assembly back into place against the shoulder of the bearing and finish tightening. Install the retainer ring and splash ring as shown.

In most cases the trunnion liners are already mounted in the trunnions of the mills. If not, they should be assembled with attention being given to match marks or in some cases to dowel pins which are used to locate the trunnion liners in their proper relation to other parts.

If a scoop feeder, combination drum scoop feeder or drum feeder is supplied with the mill, it should be mounted on the extended flange of the feed trunnion liner, matching the dowel pin with its respective hole. The dowel pin arrangement is provided only where there is a spiral in the feed trunnion liner. This matching is important as it fixes the relationship between the discharge from the scoop and the internal spiral of the trunnion liner. Tighten the bolts attaching the feeder to the trunnion liner evenly, all around the circle, seating the feeder tightly and squarely on its bevelled seat. Check the bolts holding the lips and other bolts that may require tightening. The beveled seat design is used primarily where a feeder is provided for the trunnion to trunnion liner connection, and the trunnion liner to feeder connection. When a feeder is not used these connecting joints are usually provided by a simple cylindrical or male and female joint.

If a spout feeder is to be used, it is generally supplied by the user, and should be mounted independently of the mill. The spout should project inside the feed trunnion liner, but must not touch the liner or spiral.

Ordinarily the feed box for a scoop tender is designed and supplied by the user. The feed box should be so constructed that it has at least 6 clearance on both sides and at the bottom of the scoop. This clearance is measured from the outside of the feed scoop.

The feed box may be constructed of 2 wood, but more often is made of 3/16 or plate steel reinforced with angles. In the larger size mills, the lower portion is sometimes made of concrete. Necessary openings should be provided for the original feed and the sand returns from the classifiers when in closed circuit.

A plate steel gear guard is furnished with the mill for safety in operation and to protect the gear and pinion from dirt or grit. As soon as the gear and pinion have been cleaned and coated with the proper lubricant, the gear guard should be assembled and set on its foundation.

Most Rod Mills are provided with a discharge housing mechanism mounted independently of the mill. This unit consists of the housing proper, plug door, plug shaft, arm, and various hinge pins and pivot and lock pins. The door mechanism is extra heavy throughout and is subject to adjustment as regard location. Place the housing proper on the foundation, level with steel shims and tighten the foundation bolts. The various parts may now be assembled to the housing proper and the door plug can be swung into place, securing it with the necessary lock pins.

After the mill has been completely assembled and aligned, the door mechanism centered and adjusted, and all clearances checked, the housing base can be grouted. The unit should be so located both vertically and horizontally so as to provide a uniform annular opening between the discharge plug door and the head liners.

In some cases because of space limitation, economy reasons, etc., the mill is not equipped with separate discharge housing. In such a case, the open end low discharge principal is accomplished by means of the same size opening through the discharge trunnion but with the plug door attached to lugs on the head liner segments or lugs on the discharge trunnion liner proper. In still other cases, it is sometimes effected by means of an arm holding the plug and mounted on a cross member which is attached to the bell of the discharge trunnion liner. In such cases as those, a light weight sheet steel discharge housing is supplied by the user to accommodate the local plant layout in conjunction with the discharge launder.

TRUNNION BEARING LUBRICATION. For the larger mills with trunnion bearings provided with oil seals, we recommend flood oil lubrication. This can be accomplished by a centralized system for two or more mills, or by an individual system for each mill. We recommend the individual system for each mill, except where six or more mills are involved, or when economy reasons may dictate otherwise.

In any event oil flow to each trunnion bearing should be between 3 to 5 gallons per minute. The oil should be adequately filtered and heaters may be used to maintain a temperature which will provide proper filtration and maintain the necessary viscosity for adequate flow. The lines leading from the filter to the bearing should be of copper tubing or pickled piping. The drain line leading from the bearings to the storage or sump tank should be of adequate size for proper flow, and they should be set at a minimum slope of per foot, perferably per foot. Avoid unnecessary elbows and fittings wherever possible. Avoid bends which create traps and which might accumulate impurities. All lines should be thoroughly cleaned and flushed with a solvent, and then blown free with air, before oil is added.

It is advisable to interlock the oil pump motor with the mill motor in such a way that the mill cannot be started until after the oil pump is operating. We recommend the use of a non-adjuslable valve at each bearing to prevent tampering.

When using the drip oil system it is advisable to place wool yarn or waste inside a canvas porous bag to prevent small pieces of the wool being drawn down into the trunnion journal. If brick grease is used, care should be taken in its selection with regard to the range of its effective temperature. In other words, it should be pointed out that brick grease is generally designed for a specific temperature range. Where the bearing temperature does not come up to the minimum temperature rating of the brick grease, the oil will not flow from it, and on the other hand if the temperature of the bearing exceeds the maximum temperature rating of the brick grease, the brick is subject to glazing; therefore, blinding off of the oil. This brick should be trimmed so that it rests freely on the trunnion journal, and does not hang up, or bind on the sides of the grease box.

When replacing the brick grease, remove the old grease completely. Due to the extended running time of brick grease, there is usually an accumulation of impurities and foreign matter on the top surface, which is detrimental to the bearing.

Where anti-friction bearings are supplied, they are adequately sealed for either grease or oil lubrication. If a flood system is used for the trunnion bearings and it is adequately filtered, it can then be used for pinion bearings with the same precautions taken as mentioned above, with a flow of to 1 gallons per minute to each bearing.

These lubricants can be applied by hand, but we highly recommend some type of spray system, whether it be automatic, semi-automatic or manually operated. It has been found that it is best to lubricate gears frequently with small quantities.

Start the lubrication system and run it for about ten minutes, adjusting the oil flow at each bearing. Check all of the bolts and nuts on the mill for tightness and remove all ladders, tools and other obstructions prior to starting the mill.

Before starting the mill, even though it is empty, we recommend that it be jogged one or two revolutions for a check as to clearance of the gear and its guard, splash rings, etc. The trunnion journal should also be checked for uniform oil film and for any evidence of foreign material which might manifest itself through the appearance of scratches on the journal. If there are any scratches, it is very possible that some foreign material such as weld splatter may have been drawn down into the bushing, and can be found imbedded there. These particles should be removed before proceeding further.

If everything is found to be satisfactory, then the mill should be run for ten to fifteen minutes, and stopped. The trunnion bearings should be checked for any undue temperature and the gear grease pattern can be observed for uniformity which would indicate correct alignment.

It should be noted that with an empty mill the reactions and operating characteristics of the bearings and gearing at this point are somewhat different than when operating with a ball or rod charge. Gear noises will be prominent and some vibration will occur due to no load and normal back-lash. Furthermore, it will be found that the mill will continue to rotate for some time after the power is shut off. Safety precautions should therefore he observed, and no work should be done on the mill until it has come to a complete stop.

We have now reached the point where a half ball or rod charge can be added, and the mill run for another six to eight hours, feeding approximately half the anticipated tonnage. The mill should now be stopped, end the gear grease pattern checked, and gear and pinion mesh corrected, if necessary, according to separate instructions.

The full charge of balls or rods can now be added, as well as the full amount of feed, and after a run of about four to six days, ALL BOLTS SHOULD AGAIN BE RETIGHTENED, and the gear and pinion checked again, and adjusted if necessary.

Where starting jacks are provided for the trunnion bearings of the larger sized mills, they should be filled with the same oil that is used for the lubrication of the trunnion bearings. Before starting the mill they should be pumped so as to insure having an oil film between the journal and the bushing.

When relining any part of the mill, clean away all sand from the parts to be relined before putting in the new liners. For the head liners and shell liners you may then proceed in the same manner used at the time of the initial assembly.

Before relining the grate type discharge head, it is advisable to refer to the assembly drawings and the parts list.Because of such limitations as the size of the manhole opening, and for various other reasons, it will be found that the center discharge liner and cone designs vary. The cone may be a separate piece or integral with either the trunnion liner, or the router discharge liner. Furthermore, it will be found in some mills that the center discharge liner is held by bolts through the discharge head, whereas in other cases it depends upon the clamping effect of grates to hold it in position. In any event, the primary thing to remember in assembling the discharge grate head parts is the fact that the grate should be first drawn up tightly towards the center discharge liner by adjusting the grate set screws located at the periphery of the discharge head. This adjustment should be carried out in progressive steps, alternating at about 180 if possible and in such a manner that, the center discharge liner does not become dislodged from its proper position at the center of the mill. These grate set screws should be adjusted with the side clamp bar bolts loosened. After the grates have been completely tightened with the set screws, check for correct and uniform position of each grate section. The side clamp bar bolts may now be lightened, again using an alternate process. This should result in the side clamp bars firmly bearing against the beveled sides of the grates. The side clamp bars should not hear against the lifter liners.

When new pan liners are installed, they should be grouted in position so as to prevent pulp race in the void space between the discharge head and the pan liner. Another good method of preventing this pulp race is the use of the sponge rubber which can be cemented in place.

After the mill is erected, in order to avoid overlooking both obvious and obscure installation details, we recommend the use of a check list. This is particularly recommended for multiple mill installations where it is difficult to control the different phases of installation for each and every mill. Such a check list can be modeled after the following:

No. 1 Connecting Bolts drawn tight. A. Head and Shell flange bolts. B. Gear Connecting, bolts. No. 2 Trunnion studs or bolts drawn up tight. No. 3 Trunnion liner and feeder connecting bolts or studs drawn up tight. No. 4 Feeder lip bolts tightened. No. 5 Liner bolts drawn up tight. No. 6 Gear. A. Concentric B. Backlash C. Runout D. Joint bolts drawn up tight. No. 7 Coupling and Drive alignment and lubrication. No. 8 Bearings and Gearing cleaned and lubricated. No. 9 Lubrication system in working order with automatic devices including alarms and interlocking systems.

We further recommend that during the first thirty to sixty days of operation, particular attention be given to bolt tightness, foundation settlement and condition of the grouting. We suggest any unusual occurrence be recorded so that should trouble develop later there may be a clue which would simplify diagnosing and rectifying the situation.

As a safety precaution, and in many cases in order to comply with local safety regulations, guards should be used to protect the operators and mechanics from contact with moving parts. However, these guards should not be of such a design that will prevent or hinder the close inspection of the vital parts. Frequent inspection should be made at regular intervals with particular attention being given to the condition of the wearing parts in the mill. In this way, you will be better able to anticipate your needs for liners and other parts in time to comply with the current delivery schedules.

When ordering repair or replacement parts for your mill, be sure to identify the parts with the number and description as shown on the repair parts list, and specify the hand and serial number of the mill.

By following the instructions outlined in this manual, mechanical malfunctions will be eliminated. However, inadvertent errors may occur even under, the most careful supervision. With this in mind, it is possible that some difficulties may arise. Whenever any abnormal mechanical reactions are found, invariably they can be attributed to causes which though sometimes obvious are often hidden. We sight herewith the most common problems, with their solutions.

Cause A GROUT DISINTEGRATION. Very often when the grouting is not up to specification the vibration from the mill tends to disintegrate the grouting. In most instances the disintegration starts between the sole plate and the top surface of the grouting near or at the vertical centerline of the mill. As this continues, the weight of the mill causes the sole plate and trunnion bearing base to bend with a resultant pinching action at the side of the bearing near the horizontal center line of the mill. This pinching will cut off and wipe the oil film from the journal and will manifest itself in the same manner as if the lubrication supply had been cut off. If the grout disintegration is limited to about . 050 and does not appear to be progressing further, the situation can be corrected by applying a corresponding amount of shimming between the trunnion bearing base and the sole plate near the centerline of the mill in such a fashion that the trunnion bearing base has been returned to its normal dimensional position. If, on the other hand, the grouting is in excess of . 050 and appears to be progressing further, it is advisable to shut down operations until the sole plate has been re grouted.

Cause B HIGH SPOT ON THE BUSHING. While all BallMill bushings are scraped in the shop to fit either a jig mandrel or the head proper to which it is to be fitted, nevertheless there is a certain amount of seasoning and dimensional change which goes on in the type of metals used. Therefore if high spots are found, the mill should be raised, the bushings removed and rescraped. Bluing may be used to assist in detecting high spots.

Cause C INSUFFICIENT OIL FLOW. Increase the oil supply if it is a flood oil system. If brick grease is used, it is possible that the particular grade of brick may not be applicable to the actual bearing temperature. Refer to the remarks in this manual under the paragraph entitled Lubrication.

Cause E EXCESSIVE RUBBING ON THE SIDE OF THE BUSHING. This comes about due to the improper setting of the bearings in the longitudinal plane. In some cases, particularly on dry grinding or hot clinker grinding mills, the expansion of the mills proper may account for this condition. In any event, it can be remedied by re-adjusting the bearing base on the sole plate longitudinally at the end opposite the drive.

There are many more lubricant suppliers, such as E. F. Houghton and Co. , or Lubriplate Division of Fiske Bros. Refining Co. In making your final selection of lubricants, you should consider the actual plant conditions as well as the standardization of lubricants. New and improved lubricants are being marketed, and we, therefore, suggest that you consult your local suppliers.

how ball mill works?

how ball mill works?

The ball mill is a hollow drum closed with loading and unloading end caps, filled with grinding media and rotated around its axis. The drum of the ball mill (Pic. 1) is a hollow cylinder of steel, lined inside with armor lining plates which protect it from impact and friction effects of the balls and the grinding material. The shape of drum liners has a significant impact on mills work. Drum Liners of ball mills operated on a large source material have ribs. For mills operated on the fine materials use lining with small ribs or quite smooth. Height, mutual arrangement and shape of the ribs define force of adhesion the grinding media with the drum and the results of the mills work. It is important when the character of the lining surface did not change harshly during its deterioration.

End caps molded integrally with the hollow pins. On pins planted supporting bandages. The drum is supported by two self-aligning roller through these bandages. Material loaded into the mill through the hopper. The mill is driven by a motor through a clutch, gearbox and flexible coupling. Grinding media followed to the direction of the drum rotation during its rotation, lifted to a certain height and freely fell down or rolled down.

At mills with center unloading the milled product removed by a free sink through a hollow unloading trunnion. It is necessary for the pulp level in the drum to be above the level of the lower generating unloading trunnion. Therefore mills with center unloading sometimes called drain type mills or mills with high pulp level. The unloading funnel has a slightly larger diameter than the loading funnel to create slope and for maintain a high pulp level in the mill.

Mills with unloading through the grid have a lifting device and it forced to unload the milled product. Therefore, in this type of mills the slurry level may be lower than the unloading trunnion level. Mills with unloading through the grid sometimes called mills with forced unloading or mills with a low level of pulp. This type of ball mill has a grid with openings for unloading crushed material and located in the unloading end of the drum. The grid has radial rib-lifters on side facing to the unloading end cover. Rib-lifters divide the space between the grid and the end cover on a sectorial chambers opened in the trunnion. By rotating the drum ribs act as elevators wheel and raise the pulp to the level of unloading trunnion. This device allows to maintain a low pulp level in the mill and reduces the spent time of the material in it due to the decrease of volume of the pulp.

Depending on the shape of the drum there are cylindrical mills and cylinder-conical mills. Cylindrical mills classified into three types: short mills, long mills and pipe mills. Short ball mills have a drum length less than drum diameter or equal to drum diameter. Long ball mills have a drum length more than one drum diameter, but less than three drum diameters. Pipe ball mills have a drum length longer than three drum diameters.

A cylindrical ball mill used for grinding the coarse material. This mill should have a short length because the balls distributed uniformly over the entire length of the mill and during rotation obtained the same pulse. The drum diameter of the cylindrical ball mill should be the greater, the larger the pieces of crushed material.

The balls impact on the milled material longer at the pipe ball mills. The drum of these mills lined with flint blocks inside or flint pebbles on the cement. Material continuously fed by the drum axis through a hopper at one end and leaves at the opposite end of the drum through end wall or holes on drum walls. Pipe ball mill (Pic. 3) provided with a drive with construction similar to the drive of rolling mills. The central drive shaft has milled protrusions and depressions at the ends and enters them into the corresponding coupling. In this arrangement the axial displacement of the mill is not transmitted to the reducer or motor.

The housing of the cylinder-conical ball mill consist of two cones and a short cylindrical part between them (Pic. 4). This change in the shape of a cylindrical mill is highly advisable, because achieved the proportionality between the force and useful resistance. The peripheral speed of the conical mill drum gradually decreases in the direction from the cylindrical part to the discharge outlet in the same direction reduced lifting angle of balls inside the mill, and consequently decreases their kinetic energy. The amount of milled pieces also gradually decreases as approaching to the place of unloading and this reduces energy consumption for grinding.

Should be noted, the productivity of ball mills depend on the drum diameter and ratio between the diameter and length of the drum. At the short ball mill grinding is a more rough and for grinding fineness a lot of material has to be returned from classifier to the mill, it leads to mill overload. In long ball mills the grinding occurs only at the front and the rest of the balls in the drum only increases power consumption.

Drum mills have one grinding chamber (short and long ball mills) and two or more grinding chambers (long and pipe ball mills). Single-chamber continuous mills are the main equipment at mining and processing plants.

chocolate ball mill machine | chocolate ball mill refiner for sale

chocolate ball mill machine | chocolate ball mill refiner for sale

Chocolate ball mill refining machine is designed for milling chocolate cream or similar oil-based products by the continuously frictions between high quality 6-8mm steel balls. Chocolate mass will be homogeneously ground into 20 to 25 microns in the double jacketed steel cylinder. The temperature controller will precisely control the heating and cold water supplying process to ensure the entire chocolate ball milling process running at the target temperature.

The chocolate ball refining grinder plays the similar roles as the chocolate conching machines in chocolate production industry but they are working in different grinding method. The conching machines grind chocolate paste by 30-50 pieces blades and 400-600 pieces ling bars, while the chocolate ball mill grind chocolate by the hundreds kilograms of steel balls. They can work together on the other hand to accelerate the grinding process into 2-4 hours a batch of 1000kg or even mor chocolate mass.

Chocolate ball milling machines can be customized for artisans and industrial scale production. Artisan scale ball millers are built in batch type which can work independently, the industrial ball millers need to combined work with the chocolate conches for forming a circulation of chocolate mass through the chocolate pumps delivery.

Jacketed machine body allows free flow of cold tap water, Extra heating element installed the jacket so you can easily control the temperature through Omron/Autonics brand temperature controller coupled.

They can work independently to grind chocolate at 100kg / 200kg per batch, installing an extra chocolate pump and jacketed pipeline to form a chocolate flowing circulation will accelerate the entire ball milling process and guarantee the final chocolate texture more even.

They are traditional type ball milling machines with two cylinders attached one for chocolate milling with plenty of stainless steel balls inside, the other one for temporarily saving chocolate mass and ready for further milling.

Different from the modern vertical-standing ball mill machines, these models come with integrated chocolate pump inside that creates a chocolate flow cycle itself, so there is no need to work with conching refiners.

modeling and control of ball mill system considering coal moisture - sciencedirect

modeling and control of ball mill system considering coal moisture - sciencedirect

The characteristic of duplex inlet and outlet ball mill system is analyzed.Mechanism model of a pulverizing system is established to estimate raw coal moisture.Optimization of outlet temperature is designed considering raw coal moisture.An extended state space predictive controller is designed for the pulverizing system.Kalman filter and predictive controller cooperate to achieve stable control effect.

This study analyzes the dynamic characteristics of duplex inlet and outlet ball mill direct firing pulverizing system. A mass and energy balance-based model is built by thermodynamic analysis. As a critical parameter in pulverized coal humidity control, coal moisture is considered in the mechanism model, and an extended Kalman filter is designed to estimate the coal moisture. A multivariable control system is designed using extended state space predictive controller. The dynamic characteristic of the mill can be effectively forecasted using the established model. The system can rapidly track unit load changes while reducing the disturbance caused by coal moisture and other outlets.

ball mill for sale | mining and cement milling equipment

ball mill for sale | mining and cement milling equipment

Anyang General International Co., Ltd. (AGICO Group) is a ball mills supplier. Our company is mainly engaged in the development, design, manufacture, installation and commissioning of various mining and cement milling equipment and a complete set of the industrial grinding line. AGICO Group was founded in 1997, registered capital 81.34 million yuan, covers an area of 66,000 square meters, has nearly 30,000 square meters of factory buildings and more than 150 sets of various production and processing equipment.

With more than 20 years of experience in the manufacturing and research of mineral and cement milling equipment, AGICO has more than 50 technical patents. All of our ball mills, vertical roller mill, rod mill and AG/SAG mill have passed the ISO9001 international quality system certification.

The ball mill has a vital role in the cement manufacturing process. The mixed raw materials (cement raw meal) before cement production and the finished products (cement clinker) after cement manufacture need to be ground by cement ball mill. The grinding media balls in the ball mill are used in cement plant to help grind blocky or granular grindable materials produced in the cement manufacturing process, so as to achieve the effect of grinding. Vertical roller mill(VRM) and clinker grinding mill and other cement grinding mill are also very common in cement plant.

Various ball mill machines, vertical roller mills and sag mills are widely used in the mining industry. Grate ball mills and raw mills are mostly used for mineral processing in some enterprises of mining industries. Wet ball mill and rod mill are commonly used in mineral processing production line, to grind various hardness ore materials. Customers who need to grind iron ore, siderite, marble, kaolin, mica, feldspar and other ores have chosen our mineral grinding machine.

AGICO uses the latest clean coal technology to create a professional pulverized coal ball mill. Coal mill can grind pulverized coal with different fineness requirements, with high fineness and large output, which can meet the needs of large pulverized coal projects. Coal mill is often used in thermal power plant, cement plant, coal fire power plants, etc. We grind large pieces of coal into pulverized coal, which produces more energy when burned. Therefore, the rotary kilns, boilers and other kiln equipment in these large factories usually use pulverized coal as fuel.

Efficient and energy-saving ball mill, intermittent ball mill, ceramic ball mill, rod ball mill. These types of ball mills can crush materials with different attributes. It is widely used in silicate products, new building materials, refractories, fertilizers, ferrous and non-ferrous metal smelting, glass ceramics and other production industries. Vertical mill, Raymond mill, ring roller mill which divided by different grinding methods can also be used for the production of phosphor powder, nano materials, zinc oxide powder, catalyst, rare earth polishing powder and other materials.

Production capacity: 300t/d Processed material: Silver ore Input size: 25mm Equipment: Wet grate type silver ore ball mill, wet overflow type silver ore ball mill, jaw crusher, cone crusher, flotation machine, concentrator, filter press. Auxiliary equipment: Linear vibration screen, cyclone. Request A Quote Right Now Free Solution Design: [email protected] Project Description Equipment Features Beneficiation Process

Production capacity: 1500t/d Processed material: Copper ore Input size: 25mm Equipment: 98-386t/h copper ball mill, jaw crusher, cone crusher, flotation machine, concentrator, filter press. Auxiliary equipment: Linear vibration screen, cyclone. Request A Quote Right Now Free Solution Design: [email protected] Project Description Equipment Features Beneficiation Process Project Description The 1500t/d Pakistan copper mine project uses a

Production capacity: Annual output of 300,000 tons Processed material: Soft coal Input size: 25mm Equipment: 5 sets of 20tph coal ball mill Auxiliary equipment: Desulfurization, denitrification, dust removal and other devices. Request A Quote Right Now Free Solution Design: [email protected] Project Description Equipment Features Solution Advantages Project Description The project is to build a high-efficiency

Influencing Factors of Tumbling Mill Working Capacity Tumbling mill is also known as a ball mill or rod mill. They are all composed of a cylindrical cylinder lying horizontally on the bearing, and the material is ground into powder by rotating the cylinder. When we want to discuss the factors that affect the tumbling mill

The grinding mill liners are the main wearing part of the ball mill equipment. The ball mill liner replacement should in time when the lining plate is excessively worn. Therefore, the selection and design of mill liners have always been of great concern to users. Function Design of Ball Mill Liners As one of professional

As a ball mills supplier with 22 years of experience in the grinding industry, we can provide customers with types of ball mill, vertical mill, rod mill and AG/SAG mill for grinding in a variety of industries and materials.

Related News
  1. typical aggregate product curves crushers
  2. lattice ball mill manufacturer
  3. ball mill operating machine for limestone price
  4. rod mill 682
  5. crushed stone aggregates production process
  6. abuja high quality bauxite mineral processing production line sell
  7. cost of grinding in gold production stone crusher for sale
  8. new quartz mineral processing production line in tokyo
  9. ball bearing
  10. monrovia high quality small kaolin ceramic ball mill manufacturer
  11. crushing and drilling equipment for open
  12. hst smh multi cylinder spring cone crusher
  13. simple briquette making machine
  14. austin western wet ball mill
  15. limestone extraction mining equipment requirements
  16. grinder powder manchine
  17. how to start the stone quarry business
  18. sodium feldspar gravel sand making machine
  19. material crusher mim
  20. forage rotary dryer machine price