Hello, my partner! Let's explore the mining machine together!

[email protected]

ethioscoop com habesha cement is grantedmining license

habesha cement is granted a 60 year mining license in ethiopia - cement industry news from global cement

habesha cement is granted a 60 year mining license in ethiopia - cement industry news from global cement

The contract allows Habesha to mine limestone, gypsum, clay and sandstone from 1.12km2 of land in the West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, at four different locations. The mining operations will be undertaken with a capital of US$1.38m. The land that Habesha requested for pumice is reserved for forestation and wildlife development and it has asked for a replacement.

The mining contract will be valid for 60 years, until the minerals are fully excavated. Habesha is expected to produce over 100Mt of limestone in that time. When the company starts cement production, it is expected to use 1.1Mt/yr of limestone, 70,000t/yr of gypsum, 288,000t/yr of clay, 72,000t/yr of sandstone and 450,000t/yr of pumice.

Habesha Cement was established in September 2008 by 30 shareholders with an initial capital of US$30,671. Construction of the cement plant, which will cost US$120m, is underway in Beketa and Koro Odo Kebele, Oromia Region, Ethiopia.

ministry of mines - cement industry news from global cement

ministry of mines - cement industry news from global cement

The contract allows Habesha to mine limestone, gypsum, clay and sandstone from 1.12km2 of land in the West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, at four different locations. The mining operations will be undertaken with a capital of US$1.38m. The land that Habesha requested for pumice is reserved for forestation and wildlife development and it has asked for a replacement.

The mining contract will be valid for 60 years, until the minerals are fully excavated. Habesha is expected to produce over 100Mt of limestone in that time. When the company starts cement production, it is expected to use 1.1Mt/yr of limestone, 70,000t/yr of gypsum, 288,000t/yr of clay, 72,000t/yr of sandstone and 450,000t/yr of pumice.

Habesha Cement was established in September 2008 by 30 shareholders with an initial capital of US$30,671. Construction of the cement plant, which will cost US$120m, is underway in Beketa and Koro Odo Kebele, Oromia Region, Ethiopia.

Afghanistan: The Afghan Ministry of Mines has announced that the management of three cement factories, including the Herat Cement Factory, in Afghanistan will be put out to tender by the end of March 2013. The operation of the Herat Cement Factory was previously contracted to an Iranian company but the ministry terminated the contract.

"The Iranian company could not address the articles in the contract and its commitments in due time. Following review and discussions, the Ministry of Mines terminated the contract with this company," said Ministry of Mines spokesman Ahmad Tamim Asi.

The Herat cement plant has a production capacity of 3000t/day. However, according to the ministry the company failed to meet this in 27 months because it did not have the essential technical and financial facilities to excavate the raw materials needed to produce the cement.

The ministry also said that in the next Persian year of 1392 (March 2013 to March 2014), the cement factories of Jabul Saraj in Parwan province and Ghori in Baghlan province will also be put up for bidding in order for the factories to produce more and meet domestic cement demand. Afghanistan currently imports much of its cement from its southern neighbour Pakistan, which has a cement overcapacity.

ethiopia - cement industry news from global cement

ethiopia - cement industry news from global cement

Ethiopia: The Ministry of Industry has released a draft Cement Industry Development Strategy that intends to increase domestic cement consumption to 20Mt/yr by 2025. Around US$30m will be required to realise the strategy plan that will include providing support to cement plants and overcoming the general shortage of cement in the country. The draft strategy was prepared by the Adama Science and Technology University and has been discussed by stakeholders. At present Ethiopia consumes 6Mt/yr of cement.

Ethiopia: South African cement producer PPC has acquired Industrial Development Corporation's 20% stake in Ethiopian-based Habesha Cement for a purchase consideration of US$13m. PPC's initial 27% stake in Habesha, acquired in July 2012, now rises to 51%, while the balance of the shareholding in Habesha is held by around 16,000 local shareholders.

"We are very excited about our increased investment in Ethiopia; a country with a population of 91 million people that is set to reach 100 million by 2018 and having a growth rate that is expected to remain above 8% in the medium term," said Bheki Sibiya, Executive Chairman of PPC.

Habesha has begun the construction of a 1.4Mt/yr cement plant 35 km north-west of Addis Ababa. The project has cost approximately US$135m and commissioning is planned for 2016. In addition to the Habesha project, PPC has started building projects in Rwanda, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Zimbabwe.

The contract allows Habesha to mine limestone, gypsum, clay and sandstone from 1.12km2 of land in the West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, at four different locations. The mining operations will be undertaken with a capital of US$1.38m. The land that Habesha requested for pumice is reserved for forestation and wildlife development and it has asked for a replacement.

The mining contract will be valid for 60 years, until the minerals are fully excavated. Habesha is expected to produce over 100Mt of limestone in that time. When the company starts cement production, it is expected to use 1.1Mt/yr of limestone, 70,000t/yr of gypsum, 288,000t/yr of clay, 72,000t/yr of sandstone and 450,000t/yr of pumice.

Habesha Cement was established in September 2008 by 30 shareholders with an initial capital of US$30,671. Construction of the cement plant, which will cost US$120m, is underway in Beketa and Koro Odo Kebele, Oromia Region, Ethiopia.

Ethiopia: The Development Bank of Ethiopia (DBE) has signed a loan agreement with Habesha Cement for US$33m to build a 1.4Mt/yr cement plant at Holeta in Oromia State. Additional loan agreements were also signed in late November 2013 between Habesha, the DBE and the Preferential Trade Area (PTA) Bank, the financial arm of the Common Market for Eastern & Southern Africa (COMESA). The PTA Bank is co-financing the Habesha project by lending US$50m.

According to Addis Fortune, Habesha is now seeking a letter of credit to allow equipment for the cement plant to be imported. Chinese engineering firm Northern Heavy Machinery Industries have been hired to import and erect machinery for US$80m.

Previously the DBE approved a loan for US$83m to cover 70% of the project costs but it withdrew the offer in early 2013. The current DBE loan only covers 30% of the project costs. Other investors, including PPC and South Africa's Industrial Development Corporation (SAIDC) paid US$21m for nearly half of Habesha Cement in 2012. The plant was originally scheduled to start production by 2012.

Ethiopia: Mohammed al-Amoudi, the biggest private investor in Ethiopia, plans to build two cement plants in the country due to an 'improving investment environment'. Al-Amoudi said that the new plants would join the US$351m Derba Midroc cement plant that opened in December 2011. Al-Amoudi announced in March 2012 that he intends to invest US$3.4bn in Ethiopia in 2014 2016.

Nigeria: Dangote Cement intends to reach a total cement production capacity of 50Mt/yr by 2016 which will make it Africa's largest cement producer. The company's chief executive, DVG Edwin, summarised production projects by the Nigeria-based cement producer: "Our plant in Senegal will soon be producing cement and our South African venture, Sephaku Cement, is well on track to open in early 2014. These two plants will be our first production ventures outside Nigeria as we aim to become Africa's leading supplier of cement," said Edwin.

Edwin revealed that construction work is underway at Mugher, Ethiopia for a 2.5Mt/yr cement plant. Operation is scheduled to begin in October 2015 at a 3Mt/yr gas-fired plant in Mtwara, Tanzania. Cement production is expected to start in mid-2014 at a 1.5Mt/yr in Ndola, Zambia. In Cameroon a 1.5Mt/yr grinding plant will be completed in the first half of 2014 and an integrated 1.5Mt/yr cement plant is expected to begin production in the second quarter of 2016. A 1.5Mt/yr cement plant in South Sudan and a 1.5Mt/yr integrated cement plant in Kenya are both set to become operational in 2016.

Along the coast of West Africa Dangote nears completion of import facilities to receive and bag bulk cement produced in Nigeria and Senegal. Additional import facilities in Sierra Leone are due to begin by the end of 2013 or early 2014.

In Liberia Edwin said that the order for equipment has been made for an import facility in Freeport Monrovia. Imports into Liberia are expected to commence in early 2015. The company plans to build a 1.5Mt/yr grinding plant in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, with operations projected to begin in early 2015. In Ghana, the company plans to open 1.5Mt/yr grinding plants in Tema and Takoradi by early 2015. Finally, Dangote cement has recently announced its intention to build an integrated 1.5Mt/yr plant in Niger.

Ethiopia: A TEC has released progress information on contracts to provide an alternative fuel system, which can process sesame straw and stalks, and a cement big-bag filling station for Messebo Building Materials Production in Mekelle. Both commissions were awarded in the first quarter of 2013 and local manufacturing and the erection will be performed by Mesfin Industrial Engineering PLC, a sister company of Messebo.

Installation of the alternative fuels system will start in the fourth quarter of 2013 with a planned start-up in the first quarter of 2014. Collection and preparation of straw and the production of bales will take place at Kafta Humera. The first phase of the project includes building a baling capacity of 50t/hr and an alternative fuel feeding capacity to the calciner of 10t/hr at the cement plant in Mekelle. A future upgrade, phase two, will scale the system up to a baling capacity of 71t/hr and an alternative fuel feeding capacity of 20t/hr.

The new station for big-bag filling will be installed at the cement plant in Mekelle. The system will consist of three filling stations in modular design. Each station can handle 15 bags/hr. A total number of 45 big-bags/hr with an overall capacity of 90t/hr can be reached. The big-bag filling station will be installed and commissioned at the end of 2013.

In the January 2013 issue of Global Cement Magazine, we featured a review of the Ethiopian cement industry. At the time we were hopeful with respect to the country's future cement demand, buoyed along by Ethiopia's own bold targets for development of the sector. It seemed only a matter of time before international and regional producers went to Ethiopia and cashed in on a cement plant-building bonanza.

Ethiopia's government is keen to further develop Ethiopia's cities and infrastructure and wants to increase its per-capita cement consumption from 35kg/yr at present to ~300kg/yr in the period to 2017. To do this, it is encouraging the cement sector to swell from its current capacity (7.4Mt/yr integrated capacity with additional grinding capability) to over 27Mt/yr by the same year. At the same time, the country has banned cement imports, a bold statement of intent designed to protect its own growing industry.

This week, we have learned that the country is hitting its bold production targets, largely without assistance from outside players. However, it seems that Ethiopia is incapable of consuming the volumes of cement that have been produced. As of 12 August 2013, the Ministry of Industry announced that Ethiopia made 12Mt of cement in the year to 7 July 2013, more than double the 5.4Mt/yr that it demanded over the same period. This revelation casts the government's future predictions for rapid cement demand growth in serious doubt.

However, it would take a very great leap of imagination to believe that Ethiopia could consume 27Mt/yr in 2017, five times what it does today, even with the development of major projects like the Millennium Renaissance Dam (a US$4.2bn hydroelectric project), major city and road-building projects and a rapidly growing population. Its cement capacity would have to grow by 4.9Mt/yr, representing average year-on-year cement demand growth of 52.5%/yr. Even with a cement industry the size of Ethiopia's, this represents almost impossible growth. To support this increase in demand, GDP/capita, which is often closely correlated to cement demand, would probably also have to raise fivefold, from US$374 to US$1870. This difference would take it from the bottom 20% of African nations well into the top third by this measure.

If this over-production trend continues, it does not bode well for Ethiopia's domestic cement industry. While exports may appear attractive, options are limited. Kenya to the south has a larger and more well-established cement industry, Somalia has major economic and security drawbacks and Ethiopia's relationships with Eritrea and Djibouti, both of which declared independence from Ethiopia, are tense. With no coast of its own, maritime exports will be difficult, especially with low-cost cement flowing from India, Pakistan and Iran. South Sudan, with its lack of cement production facilities, plentiful oil and major trade/border dispute with Sudan, could offer a small market for Ethiopian exports, but not enough to satisfy a ~20Mt/yr overcapacity.

Ethiopia: Ethiopia has produced 12Mt of cement, double its domestic demand, in the fiscal year that ended on 7 July 2013, according to a report released by Ministry of Industry (MoI). The country's current domestic demand for cement is estimated to be around 5.4Mt/yr.

The government expected a significant rise in cement demand in its Growth & Transformation Plan (GTP) that plans for per capita consumption of cement to increase from 35kg to 300kg. It had predicted that the demand would grow to 27Mt/yr, exceeding the 12Mt/yr cement production capacity of the country's 18 plants in the 2014 2015 fiscal year.

Ethiopia: Tamiru Wondimagegn has been appointed as board chairman of Habesha Cement. He is a prominent lawyer and board member of Habesha Cement. He succeeds Gizaw Teklemariam, who previously worked in the oldest state owned cement factory, Mugher.

Habesha held elections for its board in late January 2013, following a reduction in board places from 12 to nine. The Ethiopian cement producer has also given three board of directors seats to two South African companies, International Development Corporation and Pretoria Portland Cement, which are credited for bringing in 49% equity to Habesha.

mining - cement industry news from global cement

mining - cement industry news from global cement

India: According to the United News of India, ACC has suspended limestone mining operations at its Chaibasa plant in Jharkhand because of regulatory issues. ''The limestone mining operations at the Chaibasa plant have been suspended on account of the requirement of further clearances from the government of Jharkhand,'' said ACC in a statement.

The company is in discussion with the concerned authorities and expects that limestone mining operations would resume shortly. Cement grinding continues with the transfer of clinker from sister cement plants and the purchase of clinker. ACC said that the impact of the closure of the mining operations at Chaibasa is not expected to be material.

ACC stopped mining at Bargarh in October 2014 following a government notice to suspend operations at the plant. The company stopped clinker production at its Chaibasa, Jharkhand, and Bargarh plants, but continued to operate the grinding units associated with these. "The impact of the closure was not material since cement grinding continued with the transfer of clinker from sister works and clinker purchases," said ACC.

State governments were issued orders to stop mining, following a Supreme Court judgement in the matter of Goa Foundation versus Union of India and Others and in Common Cause versus Union of India on the deemed renewal of mining leases and a subsequent amendment to The Mineral Concession Rules 1960.

India: In the first major step towards opening the coal mining sector, India's government will start allocating coal blocks to state governments for commercial mining. The move, which is expected to be undertaken in April 2015, will put an end to the 41-year-old monopoly over the commercial sale of coal.

The coal ministry will allot non-operational mines to state governments for commercial coal mining for end use in the iron, steel, cement and allied sectors. This will bring business and revenue to coal-rich states, which have so far only received royalties from private companies mining coal for captive use.

"Non-operational mines will be allotted to state governments to extract coal for commercial usage and market sale. States could then sell this coal to the utilities under their umbrella or any private company for various end uses, as specified in the ordinance," said a senior official. This is pursuant to an enabling provision on commercial mining and sale of coal in the coal ordinance (special provisions), 2014. The coal ministry will also issue guidelines for the appointment of mining development operators (MDOs) by states.

The coal ordinance has inserted section 3A in the Coal Mines Nationalisation Act to enable joint ventures by central and state governments and their companies and any other company, for mining operations in India 'in any form, either for own consumption, sale or for any other purpose,' in accordance with a licence granted by the state government concerned.

India: The Centre of Mining has decided to put 31 minerals under the control of state governments by scaling down their status from major to minor as part of a mining policy change, according to Mines minister Narendra Singh Tomar. This allows states to decide the mining lease of the minerals, which account for about 60% of the total leased area in the country.

The decentralised minerals include gypsum, quartz, chalk and china clay. The change in policy will let states decide the rate of royalty, contribution to the district mineral foundation, procedure for grant of mineral concessions and rules. The Mines Ministry will allow states' public sector undertakings to explore minerals in areas under their jurisdiction.

"It is an important step in fulfilling the minimum government, maximum governance motto of our government," said Tomar. "This is being done to devolve more power to the states and expedite the process of mineral development in the country." States cannot lease out major minerals such as coal and iron ore without mandatory clearances from central ministries. High revenue earners, coal and iron ore, retain their positions as major minerals even after the policy shift.

The decision to broaden the list of minor minerals should drastically shorten the lease approval process because the state would be dealing with all the paperwork. Production should also increase. However, India could be treading on a minefield of environmental degradation if adequate protection measures are not taken.

Zimbabwe: Plans to build a cement plant in Zvishavane by Chinese investors have been challenged as it has emerged that the mining rights in the area belong to Shabanie Mashaba Mines (SMM). This may delay the project as SMM is still the subject of an ownership dispute between the government and South African-based businessman Mutumwa Mawere.

The project was intended to be built 30km from the Zvishavane along the Zvishavane-Mbalabala road, according to local press. It was part of the deals made with China after President Robert Mugabe's visit to China in 2014 as well as negotiations between the Joint Zimbabwe-China Permanent Commission.

Tanzania: The Tanzania Portland Cement Company (TPCC) and the Tanzanian government have agreed to start producing limestone from mines within Boko prison territory in early 2015. Permanent Secretary at Ministry of Home Affairs Mbaruk Abdulwakil, Commissioner General of Prisons John Minja and TPCC Managing Director Alfonse Rodriguez have announced that a final agreement on the partnership will be sealed by the end of 2014.

"In principle, the government has approved this public private partnership, which is part of reforming and modernising the prison services," said Abdulwakil. The government will receive 1200 cement bags and US$58,000 to build Boko prison staff quarters and office facilities. In return TPCC will mine limestone within the Boko prison premises for use as raw material at its Wazo hill plant.

Tanzania: The chairman and president of Dangote Group, Alhaji Aliko Dangote, is set to invest in developing the Mbinga Coal Mine in west Tanzania to power the Mtwara cement plant. The sale of excess coal will be used to finance cement exports from Tanzania.

According to reports, Dangote Cement plans to take advantage of the surge in local demand for cement amidst increased construction activity in the region using its 3Mt/yr capacity Mtwara cement plant when it is completed. Dangote Cement expects cement demand in Tanzania to surge in the near future due to the country's improving economic performance.

India: Spectrum Meghalaya Cement Company is planning a 2Mt/yr limestone mining project in West Kameng District, Arunachal Pradesh. The limestone will be used for its cement plant, which is being constructed adjacent to the mine. The project is waiting for its mining lease and mining work is expected to commence in 2015.

India: Shree Cement is planning an expansion of its captive limestone-mining project at Baloda Bazar, Raipur District, Chhattisgarh from 4.8Mt/yr to 8.6Mt/yr on 5.31km2 of land. The project will be part of its integrated cement plant and will be designed by JM Enviro Net. The expansion is currently waiting for environmental clearance. Mining work is expected to commence within two years.

The contract allows Habesha to mine limestone, gypsum, clay and sandstone from 1.12km2 of land in the West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, at four different locations. The mining operations will be undertaken with a capital of US$1.38m. The land that Habesha requested for pumice is reserved for forestation and wildlife development and it has asked for a replacement.

The mining contract will be valid for 60 years, until the minerals are fully excavated. Habesha is expected to produce over 100Mt of limestone in that time. When the company starts cement production, it is expected to use 1.1Mt/yr of limestone, 70,000t/yr of gypsum, 288,000t/yr of clay, 72,000t/yr of sandstone and 450,000t/yr of pumice.

Habesha Cement was established in September 2008 by 30 shareholders with an initial capital of US$30,671. Construction of the cement plant, which will cost US$120m, is underway in Beketa and Koro Odo Kebele, Oromia Region, Ethiopia.

Related News
  1. disadvantages of using excess live during manufacture of cement
  2. cement block making business in nigeria
  3. cement miller price
  4. drying biosolids with rotary drum
  5. continuous rotary drum dryer
  6. ethiopia combustor of rotary kiln
  7. cement plant duct auto design
  8. rotary kiln for lime plants
  9. concrete crusher new mexico for rent
  10. rotary dryer kya h in hindi
  11. gold flotation machine project pdf
  12. cement machinery cement machinery manufacturers for sale
  13. mining plant with mill
  14. yokohama efficient portable river sand system sand production line sell at a loss
  15. sand residue in washing machine
  16. shaking 3 days postpartum
  17. cement plants machinery in india crusherasia
  18. powder grinding machine price in delhi
  19. processes involved in mining of gold
  20. raymond mill operation video