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gold mining equipment - gold prospecting mining equipment detectors snake protection

gold mining equipment - gold prospecting mining equipment detectors snake protection

Prospecting for gold can be done in various ways, thanks to a wide variety of gold mining equipment on the market today. The most basic method is to use a gold pan. Although the old time prospectors used heavy metal pans, plastic gold pans are lighter and nearly indestructible. Today, pans come in a variety of sizes, colors, and even shapes. Not all gold pans are round anymore. The best example of that is the Gold Claw. You can still buy steel or copper pans if you prefer, but plastic pans are inexpensive and light-weight so your arms dont tire too quickly. Gold panning kits are a great way to buy pans and accessories all at the same time. Another piece of gold mining equipment that the old-timers used is a sluice box. Back in the days of the California 49ers, gold sluices were homemade, heavy, and built of wood. Not any more! A gold sluice is essentially a long, narrow "box" that water passes through when put in a creek or stream. The idea is to position a sluice box in a running stream so that the water does the work separating the dirt and rocks away from the gold. Since gold is heavy, it will stay in the bottom of the sluice, trapped in the miner's moss or ribbed matting. Todays gold sluices are available in a variety of lengths, usually constructed of aluminum, and are found in a variety of sizes from folding sluices, which can be carried in a backpack, to solid body models up to 48 inches long. A highbanker (also called a Power Sluice) is basically a sluice box with mobility and added height. It is mounted on a 4-legged stand that gives the sluice box the correct slope. Instead of being put right in the creek like a sluice, an engine with a water pump and some hoses transports the water up from the stream into the highbanker. Gravel is then shoveled into the hopper, which is mounted at the top end of the sluice box. Inside the hopper is a "grizzly" which is a series of sloping rods that filter out larger rocks. Also in the hopper are spray bars that shoot water onto the gravel that is shoveled into the hopper. In addition to the ability to go just about anywhere, the highbanker also is able to run more material in less time than a regular sluice. With power sluices, you have several choices of riffles, spray bars, carpets, miner's moss, engine-pump combinations, hoses, and frames so you can find the highbanker that meets your needs. The smaller models often come with a pack frame so it can be backpacked if your gold claim or favorite stream is in a remote location making it a versatile piece of gold mining equipment that you dont want to be without. If youre not concerned with size and really want a workhorse, check out the CC690 Power Sluice. This power sluice comes on wheels so you can easily transport it down to your river or stream. Drywashers are like highbankers but they do not use water. Drywashers are excellent gold mining tools for use in areas where water is not available, such as arid and desert areas.

To free gold from rocks, or to do sampling in the field, consider a rock crusher. And with all sizes of kilns available, you can do your own smelting at home, too. A Vac Pac is more like a backpack and is ideal for literally vacuuming gold out of dry cracks and crevices, and where it collects in moss and weeds along a riverbank.

An automatic spiral gold panning machine helps you separate the gold from your concentrates and black sand much more quickly and easily than just panning. It's the ideal machine if you don't have the muscle power or time to separate your fine gold concentrates by hand. Deep cut spirals with sharp edges are key for gold recovery. The Gold Cube is also an excellent fine gold recovery tool. It is a super concentrator that will take your buckets of dirt down to a cup worth in no time! A Blue Bowl is usually the final step after using your Gold Cube. A hand dredge is a handy device when working in an area where motorized equipment is not permitted, and when there are hard-to-reach crevices and boulders that are usually natural gold traps. This list by no means all of the great pieces of gold mining equipment available today, but its a good representation if you're new to prospecting. To find out what might best suit your needs, attend a gold show to see a live demo, watch product videos, and ask questions. And the best part is that you dont have to find much gold to cover the cost of your equipment and supplies and still make a profit for years to come. In the meantime, until you find your own gold, you can always buy gold nuggets by the gram or Alaskan paydirt as inspiration, for a gift, and because the shiny yellow metal is just plain pretty!

klondike gold rush - gold prospecting mining equipment detectors snake protection

klondike gold rush - gold prospecting mining equipment detectors snake protection

Ho! for the Klondike. Stick to the trail and mush on! Those were words to live by in 1897 and 1898 when more than 100,000 fortune-seekers used Skagway as their jumping off point to the gold fields some 600 miles beyond. To gain insight into the extraordinary Gold Rush that peaked and plummeted within just two short years, a visit to Skagway is a must. No need to stock up on pickaxes and bags of beans and flour beforehand as was required of the first stampeders, but you might want to bring a spirit of adventure and a camera.

Back-dropped by snow-capped mountains, Skagway today (formerly spelled Skaguay or Skagua, as it was known by the Tlingit Indians, meaning windy place) is the year-round home to about 920 Alaskans. The small towns gold rush era architecture and history are well preserved. Six blocks of downtown have been designated as the Klondike Gold Rush National Historic District and are managed by the National Park Service, so theres a good bit of yesteryear mixed in with modern gift shops and museums. Join a free ranger-led walking tour of the historic district, or pick up a self-guided walking map. Its easy to explore on foot just head down Broadway along the rough-hewn boardwalk.

The best place to begin your visit is at the Klondike Gold Rush Visitor Center, housed in the historic White Pass and Yukon Route Railroad Depot at Second and Broadway. Watch the 30 minute film "Gold Fever: Race to the Klondike" in the auditorium, then take a look at the exhibits and artifacts on display. Nearby at Third and Broadway is the Mascot Saloon an authentic saloon museum containing more interesting displays and dioramas. To learn about Skagways founder, visit the historic Moore House and Cabin at Fifth and Spring Streets. The driftwood-encrusted building on Broadway bearing the letters AB for Arctic Brotherhood dates to 1899. It once was the first social order established by gold miners, but now its the most-photographed place in town. Its also pretty impressive to note that a few businesses such as Kirmses Curios, first opened over a century ago, and are still thriving. Look for their advertisement painted high on the rocks above town.

If you get thirsty for more than knowledge while in Skagway, stop in for a sarsaparilla or other cold beverage at the lively Red Onion Saloon. It used to be a brothel, but now youll just find good, clean fun. Have a look at the museum on the top floor, or better yet, take a walking tour of the town with a working girl and learn about the ladies very important role in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as hear a few ghost stories. You are certain to learn a thing or two from the likes of Madame Lacy Knickers or Madam Ella Vagoodtime or another talented actress turned tour guide!

For an amusing encounter with Skagways history, board a sunny yellow Skagway Street Car on Second Avenue. The authentic vehicles were created in 1923 for President Warren Hardings visit to Skagway. Since then, tourists wishing to see all points of interest (as proclaimed by the advertising painted on the side) hop aboard for a 90-minute narrated tour. While driving in and around town, a costumed guide brings Skagways wild and lawless past to life. The stories are amazing!

Imagine Skagway in 1898a chaotic, unkempt city. At any given time, 10,000 or so gold rush stampeders lived here in tents and other make-shift structures. Another 1,000 hopeful prospectors passed through every week. Thanks to a few colorful characters especially notorious con artist and crime boss Jefferson Soapy Smith corruption and gunfights were commonplace. Youll find Soapys final resting place, and that of Frank Reid, beloved citizen who lost his own life when he killed Soapy, at the Gold Rush Cemetery on the outskirts of the city. Youll also see grave proof of the epidemics that swept through the town because of overcrowded and unsanitary conditions.

Although Skagway is central to the Klondike Gold Rush, the alluring story actually begins in Seattle, Washington on July 17, 1897. Sailing down from Dawson City in Canada's Yukon Territory, the SS Portland arrived in Seattle with 68 rich miners and nearly two tons of gold on board. Three days earlier, the Excelsior had docked in San Francisco, also carrying miners and tons of gold from St. Michael, Alaska. Word and excitement spread quicker than wildfire. The headlines of every major newspaper across the country, and the world, exclaimed GOLD! STACKS OF YELLOW METAL IN THE KLONDIKE!

Fortuitously, Seattle immediately launched an unprecedented public relations campaign that established the port city as the place to get the ton of goods (about 1,000 pounds of food and another 1,000 pounds of gear) required by the Canadian Mounties for admittance into the Klondike. The campaign was ingenious. The majority of the 100,000 gold seekers on their way north thought of Seattle as the logical start to their expedition, and bought all or most of their supplies here.

Its hard to imagine hauling 400 pounds of flour, 150 pounds of bacon, 125 pounds of beans, plus cookware, clothes, and tools, but it was actually a smart mandate for the long trail to the gold. Having a years worth of food and equipment protected miners from starvation while they waited out bad weather and worked their claims in hope of finding the mother lode. By the spring of 1898, Seattle merchants had sold stampeders goods worth $25 million far more than the value of the gold dug from the Klondike during the same period. A ton of goods became a catch phrase for the Klondike Gold Rush all in hopes of finding a ton of gold!

An excellent place to learn about the frenzy of the Klondike Outfit Rush is at the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in downtown Seattle. Signage, exhibits, and audiovisual programs fully document the exciting story of the stampeders. You can see demonstrations of early mining equipment here, and park rangers show visitors how to pan for gold. The museum is very well done and part of the broader Klondike Gold Rush International Historical Park that also includes sites in Canada and Alaska.

Wondering why so many men (and women) would eagerly leave the familiar and risk the unknown based on a couple of gold-laden steamships making front page news? The answer is simple most didnt have anything to lose. U.S. gold reserves plummeted in 1893, the stock market crashed, and millions were barely scraping by. More than a downturn, the Panic of '93 was a serious economic crisis. Hundreds of banks failed. Railroads failed. Businesses failed. The discovery of Klondike gold actually brought hope. After several years of depression, it gave men a sense of purpose and adventure a way to provide for their families and get ahead. Gold was seen as stable and dependable. And the newspaper hype (far away land seems lined with gold and cash paid for gold dust) promised quick wealth. Everyone seemed to know someone who knew someone who supposedly found a fortune. The Klondike was a golden opportunity to strike it rich! What these hopeful prospectors didnt know, though, is that by they time they would finally reach the Klondike (most arrived in late June 1898, two years after gold was first discovered), the richest land would already be claimed and worked out.

Gold was first found in a tributary of the Klondike River, 600 miles from Skagway. On August 16, 1896, American prospector George Carmack, his Tagish Indian wife Kate (Shaaw Tla), her brother Skookum Jim (Keish) and their nephew Dawson Charlie (Ka Goox) made an amazing discovery quite by chance. Resting by Rabbit Creek (later renamed Bonanza Creek), Carmack noticed a metallic glitter in the shallow water while washing a dishpan. Eureka! The very next day, these fortunate few filed their official claims, and before too long, anyone lucky enough to be in the area and hear the good news followed suit. By November of that year, 338 claims had been recorded in the Klondike.

Because it took a year before this wealth of Klondike news reached the outside world, the excited hopefuls down in the States couldnt have known that there wouldnt be much good land left for them to claim. The gold that was mined that first winter in the Klondike wasnt shipped out until the following spring when the navigation season opened. And by the time those gold-bearing steamships and jubilant miners made headlines, it was old news along the Yukon River.

Although not fully prepared or informed, determined gold seekers stampeded out of Seattle, choosing either an all water route to Dawson City, or a combination water and land route. The rich mans route sailed from Seattle to St. Michael, Alaska, then up the Yukon River to Dawson. The combination route was much less expensive, therefore, the most popular. Ships sailed from Seattle through the Inside Passage and up the Lynn Canal to the ports of Dyea or Skagway, Alaska. Prospectors could then choose to hike over the mountains from either port town to Lake Bennett, British Columbia. At Lake Bennett, a boat would be needed to continue the remaining 550 miles to the gold fields. Hiking options included the Chilkoot Trail from Dyea, which was shorter but more difficult, or via the White Pass Trail out of Skagway that was about 10 miles longer, but less steep. No matter which route the miners chose, the North West Mounted Police met them at the top and made sure each miner had the requisite ton of supplies before being allowed to mush on into Canada.

Roughly 30,000 indomitable prospectors chose to battle the 33-mile Chilkoot. The trail was rough, and the weather was harsh. In early April 1898, a storm hit the Chilkoot Pass, triggering an avalanche that killed 60 people. Many turned back, especially when faced with the formidable frozen Golden Staircase at the end. This last long difficult incline is a quarter mile climb gaining 1,000 vertical feet! To get their load up the ice stairway, prospectors had to repeatedly go up and down it 20 or 30 times, which took about three months! Those with the means hired native Tlingit Indians to help haul their heavy gear. Some used packhorses, and for a few months, there were even several aerial tramways to help move freight. But most men couldnt afford help, and muscled it solo, slowly but surely.

Today, the Chilkoot Trail is littered with rusty relics and considered to be the world's longest outdoor museum. Remnants of wooden buildings and canvas tent cities appear every few miles. Its tempting to swing a metal detector here, but you cant. Modern-day hikers challenging the Trail must only stay in designated campsites and leave every artifact. Theres nothing left now of the town of Dyea, but at the height of the Klondike Gold Rush, 150 businesses, including 48 hotels and two hospitals, served the masses.

Although gold was never found in the Skagway River Valley, Skagway was a better, deeper port than Dyea, so it earned the reputation as the Gateway to the Klondike. Most stampeders jumped off here. If miners hadnt brought along enough supplies from Seattle, this was their last chance to get outfitted. If you didnt have $500 to buy your grubstake (requisite ton of goods), and were in Skagway after May 1898, you could work for the White Pass & Yukon Railroad Company for $3 a day. Built to carry miners into the Klondike, it was said that the railroad employed the most highly educated workforce. Many of the 35,000 recruits had been doctors, lawyers, and other professionals before they risked it all and joined the Gold Rush. In fact, some of the former doctors were pulled away from driving rail spikes to assist the railroads surgeons in the field. Debris from blasting away granite hillsides caused many, many injuries.

The $10 million White Pass Yukon Route (WPYR) project got underway in April 1898 and was led by experienced railroad contractor Michael Heney. Give me enough dynamite and snoose and Ill build a railroad to Hell, bragged Heney one night at the St. James hotel in Skagway. Looking for his next challenge, he was determined to forge a route to Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory. When surveyors insisted that constructing a railroad through solid granite, up steep grades, around cliff hugging turns, and in unimaginable weather conditions couldnt be done, he built it anyway. Thanks to investors in London, a lot of human muscle power, 450 tons of blasting powder, and a pinch of snuff between his cheek and gum, the narrow gauge WPYR was completed in two years, two months, and two days. Unfortunately, it didnt reach Lake Bennett (the beginning of the river and lakes route to Dawson City) until July 1899 too late to be of much use to the majority of the stampeders who had reached there on foot a year prior. Alaska cruise ships now bring far more tourist business to the historic railroad than the original gold rush ever did, but a narrated ride on The Scenic Railway of the World is unforgettable.

Before the railroad, an alternative to hiking the Golden Staircase was the White Pass Trail from Skagway. Although less steep than the Chilkoot, it still took miners about a month to lug all their gear about 45 miles up to the White Pass Summit elevation 2,865 feet. In some places, the path was only two feet wide and a 500-foot drop awaited any animal or miner who made a misstep. A particularly gruesome section of the route, Dead Horse Gulch, was aptly named because during the 1897-1898 winter, 3,000 pack animals died here. Some slipped and fell, but most were literally worked to death. As gold fever set in, hurried miners had no regard for the animals. When one died, they left it to rot, bought another and then another all in their haste to get to the gold. Residents of Skagway complained about the smell wafting down into the city.

Whether gold seekers trudged the Chilkoot or the White Pass Trail, both converged at Lake Bennett on the border between British Columbia and Yukon, Canada. A large tent city sprang up on its shores, offering all the services of a major city to thousands of fervent adventurers. This is where miners built boats and waited for break up. Once the river ice melted, they still had to navigate 550 miles down the mighty Yukon River to the gold fields at Dawson City. In late May 1898, the North West Mounted Police counted over 7,000 boats, rafts, canoes, skiffsanything that would float ready to launch. Many men didnt make it to Dawson, though, and drowned in the river rapids.

As you might expect, Dawson City, located at the confluence of the Yukon and Klondike Rivers, boomed with the discovery of nearby gold. Although it might have felt good to weary prospectors to be off the trail, life in crowded Dawson wasnt grand. Many succumbed to dysentery or other diseases. Merchants did well, though. Just like back in Seattle or Skagway, they made a fortune selling over-priced food and equipment. Want a fresh egg? Youll need $5. Whiskey was $40 a gallon. Then as now, prices were determined by supply and demand.

By the time most stampeders reached Dawson City from Seattle, nearly two years had passed since the local gold discovery. Without good land to work, disillusioned fortune- hunters simply sold their gear in exchange for steamboat fare home. Others heard about another gold discovery in Nome, Alaska and went there. During one week in August 1899, 8,000 people deserted Dawson for the beaches of Nome. Miners not daunted by the slim pickings or strenuous work in the Yukon, stayed put and set about learning how to melt the permafrost soil. Shafts were dug almost down to bedrock to get to the gold-bearing dirt and gravel. That material was then sluiced when the streams were not frozen. Just think how much a modern-day highbanker would have helped the old-timers!

The Klondike Gold Rush statistics are sad but true: it is estimated that of the 100,000 people who embarked for Dawson City, 40,000 reached it; 20,000 actually worked mining claims, but only 300 made more than $15,000 in gold (which made them millionaires back then). Of those 300 who struck it rich, only 50 kept their wealth for any length of time. George Carmack, whose discovery sparked this Gold Rush, did get rich and reportedly took a million dollars worth of gold out of his Klondike claims. Amounts vary by source, but the U.S. Mints in Seattle and San Francisco reported receiving an approximate total of $48 million in Klondike gold between 1897 and 1900.

If youre heading to Skagway or beyond to get a feel for the incredible short-lived Gold Rush, you still might need a pickaxe and some pans, but you probably wont need 25 pounds of potatoes, 15 pounds of salt, or 8 pounds of baking powder. As you walk the streets and visit the sites, you can almost feel the frenzied pace that first filled this gold rush boomtown 115 years ago. And if you look close enough, maybe, just maybe, youll see a little left-over gold dust shimmering in the cracks of the plank sidewalks!

dark secrets behind gold rush | screenrant

dark secrets behind gold rush | screenrant

When it comes to reality television, there are a few showsout there that draw a lot of viewers. No, we aren't talking about anything the Kardashians are up to, but rather, some of the shows over on the Discovery Channel. One of the biggest isGold Rush, which features a group of inexperienced miners trying to dig out enough gold to earn a living in the harsh wilderness. Viewers tune in to see what a bunch of folks, not too dissimilar to themselves, are doing to make it big in a profession many people know little about.

Reality television isn't as true to reality as viewers might like to believe,but the production team works hard to ensure everything looks natural. Of course, they can't keep everything buried for long and eventually, things tend to be revealed from behind the scenes.

While helooks like a big teddy bear and he certainly seems like a nice enough fellow on the show, according to several other cast members, Todd Hoffman isn't that nice of a guy. According to some sources, he has turned away family and friends in the pursuit of fame and fortune at the bottom of a gold mine.

Former miners from the show have given interviews where they describe a man who is deeply troubled and an inexperienced miner. In one episode, he can be seen screaming at a fellow miner, which was reportedly not scripted (more on that later), but straight from the heart.

You might remember a miner who had some trouble back in the first two seasons ofGold Rush. Miner James Harness was a regular for the first two years of the show but ended up getting canned for failing to achieve a 100-ounce goal that was established by the team. Throughout his time on the series, he was clearly a man in pain, which hediscussed and tried to deal with.

Harness was the victim of a severe car accident years prior to the show, which left him in constant agony. To treat this, he took and eventually became addicted to pain medication. His addiction to painkillers was also one of the sources of his troubles on the series and may have even contributed to his termination.

It may not come as much of a surprise to learn that people operating in the wilderness might come into contact with some of the wildlife from time to time. One of the residents of the local bear population got a little close to the production area of the show back in May of 2010 and didn't fare too well from the encounter.

Bears rarely interact with humans in a manner that represents a dangerous situation. That's due to the people knowing how to deal with them. Ask any camper and they will tell you not to leave food out where a bear can get it. If only someone told the relatively inexperienced miners who worked for Gold Rush.

When you stake all of your money on a venture like gold mining, it's important to ensure your equipment is top-notch and that it works properly. Unfortunately, it seems that the rather inexperienced crew have let some of their equipment die instead of maintaining it properly, which, as any true miner would tell you,is just reckless and stupid.

Of course, it does make for good television if an important piece of mining equipment needed to get to that last ounce of gold suddenly shuts down. Whether this is due to improper maintenance or simply using the device in a way it was never intended, it's not a great way to dig for gold.

There have been claims that the crew may have been encouraged to forego maintenance by the production team to allow for some additional drama, which could explain why some of their stuff doesn't last the season.

So, you decided to sit down and watchGold Rush? Great! Now you might find that you really like a particular miner due to their professionalism, character, charisma, or whatever. After a season of only a few episodes, that miner might just disappear without any further explanation leaving you to have to dig through the bowels of the Internet in an attempt to find out what happened.

Both of the Hursts, Jason Otteson, Michael Halstead, and Dustin Hurst have all vanished from the series without a single mention in subsequent episodes. This can be confusing and frustrating for viewers, especially since nobody even talks about them ever again.

Dave Turin ended up leaving the show after the final on season seven. If you missed it, there was an actual brawl between him and Trey Poulson. Turin had been on the show for six seasons and then he vanished.

This world is full of good people and bad, but for most folks, we all just want to get along. That doesn't work too well when it comes time to edit a reality television series where everyone is getting along most of the time. For many of the people on the show who are depicted as villainous, the audience is just seeing whatever the producers and editors of the show want us to see.

For former miner/cast-member Jimmy Dorsey, he claimed that 90% of what he did on the show was never seen, but that 10% that didn't end up on the cutting room floor sure painted him in a negative light. According to Dorsey, the production team was more interested in "creating a character" out of him than just showing the world who he really was.

Environmental protections exist for a reason and there are representatives who go out to mining sites to ensure people are doing things properly. The producers of the show have had to deal with this sort of thing since the series began, but not exactly in the manner you might think.

In one instance, representatives went out to the site to instruct the crew on how to properly use groundwater instead of diverting water from a river or stream. It was nice of them to do that since they could have just issued a fine and told them to fix their mistake, but it turns out, the producers wanted the fine.

A fine creates drama and what would a television series be without drama? The producers were upset they missed out on the free publicity that would have come from having to deal with the courts and things were settled civilly.

The miners and producers of the show have been sued a number of times by people in the communities they dig for various reasons. Following the 2017 season, the residents of South Park have filed a lawsuit attempting to prevent the crew from returning to their claim in the Colorado town in 2018. The claim made by the group calling themselves "Save South Park" have insisted the Hoffman crew is only "Mining for ratings", which may not be too far offfrom the mark.

Many of their complaints are related to the noise the miners make, but there have been other claims that their mining claim was improperly given and that they are mining in land that was originally zoned residential. While land-use claims aren't the most interesting things to discuss on television, the lawsuit might prevent production from returning if the residents are successful.

Some reality television shows film everything for hours on end and just edit out the bits and pieces that make for good television. When it comes toGold Rush, they take a more relaxed approach to filming and just turn on the cameras whenever they feel they should. This can lead to them missing some of the action, which is never good for ratings.

What's a film crew to do in this situation? Simple: they feed the lines back to the cast and has them "act" out the scene as if it's happening for the first time. This way, if they miss a line or one is delivered poorly, it's no problem! They simply reshoot the "scene" and make sure the camera gets what it wants. What's a little reality television without some reshoots?

If you are a fan of the series, you know that Parker Schnabel lives in poverty since he basically says as much in front of the camera. He may not have started out rich, but his time on the series hasn't left him destitute and begging for scraps. According to a report onFox News back in 2015, Schnabel is filthy rich.

His time on season five earned him a cool million dollars, which is more than the average American sees in decades of work. That's all well and good--he's on a television show where they dig for gold so it shouldn't be too surprising that the guy is rolling in the dough. The secret nature of his true wealth is what we take issue with here.

Additionally, Schnabel still claims that he is in more debt than anyone else his age so the world should probably take pity on him. That's a tough request to follow given that the guy is pulling in seven figures.

Let's face it,Gold Rush is all about inexperienced miners trying to make it big digging for gold. The series began with Tod Hoffman selling most of his possessions to take on the prospect of digging for gold full-time. He didn't really know what he was doing so he surrounded himself with people who hopefully did, but if you ever watched the first few seasons, they knew more about gold mining than your average person but far less than your average gold miner.

Putting people who don't know what they are doing into an activity that is inherently dangerous is... well, it's dangerous to them and to the people around them. Fortunately, the series hasn't seen any major injuries or deaths, but that's likely due to the producers keeping people around behind the cameras to ensure nobody lops off a foot trying something crazy.

When you work as an actor/miner on a reality television series for Discovery, your pay is related to the amount of time you spend in front of the camera. This has pushed a couple of people to act out in order to get more airtime, which isn't all that surprising when a gold claim isn't producing as much as the crew would hope.

A lot of this has to do with the way the show is shot. Instead of filming absolutely everything happening and editing out the parts they like, the film crew sets up shots and films whenever they decide its best. This has caused some of the miners to act out in order to attract the attention of the crew and get themselves filmed.

It wasn't just the bear who had to pay the price for the glory ofGold Rush;an entire run of salmon and their habitat were also destroyed. The crew reportedly drove a 50-ton piece of mining equipment through a salmon habitat, resulting in its destruction.

Salmon spawn in the same place they were born and they somehow know where to go when it comes time toprocreate. An unlucky group of fishwas unable to spawn, which certainly resulted in their demise-- not to mention the failed attempt at reproducing.

Salmon habitats are protected to ensure the survival of the species, but the crew insisted that State laws permitted them to drive their machinery across rivers and streams. Even if that were true, State officials probably didn't intend for the destruction of an entire ecosystem.

Speaking of earned income that doesn't come out of the ground, the people on the show actually make a pretty good living. At the end of the day, this is a television series and despite what the production crew might lead you to believe, they do pay their miners. These people are working for Discovery despite the suggestion that they are working for the gold they retrieve inexpertly from the ground.

They have to be paid, by law, and they are compensated very well. While their salaries aren't exactly public knowledge, some estimates have put them at earning in the mid to high six-figure salaries for their work on the show. This salary is in addition to their earnings from the gold they dig up, which makes amateur gold mining a pretty good profession so long as there is someone from Discovery there to film it.

We hope you are sitting down for this one because it is the most shocking revelation of all... well, not really, but if you didn't already know, reality television shows are scripted. Sure, there are parts of the series that aren't scripted at all, like some of the dialogue, but many shows are laid out in such a manner that you might as well simply call them scripted television. Normally, this is a closely-guarded secret, but people who have leftGold Rush have spoken out and let the cat out of the bag.

Miner Jimmy Dorsey gave an interview toOregon Gold where he confirmed this. He said that many of the things that happen on the show are planned well in advance. This included his leaving the show and most of the events that took place while he was on camera.

Jonathan is a graphic artist, illustrator, writer, and game designer. Jonathan retired from the U.S. Army in 2017 and enjoys researching and writing about history, science, theology, and many other subjects. He writes for ScreenRant, CBR, NerdBastards, Listverse, Ranker, WhatCulture, and many other sites online. You can check out his latest on Twitter: @TalkingBull or on his blog: jonathanhkantor.com

may 28, gold rush: mining gold and dirty gold at the game jioforme

may 28, gold rush: mining gold and dirty gold at the game jioforme

Hello miner! Code Horizon and Discovery have announced that Gold Rush: The Game will be available on PlayStation 4 on May 28th. This original gold mining experience is based on Discovery Channels # 1 show Gold Rush. On the release date, you will have access to all playable content (including DLC) released so far. The goal is to work hard, dig deeper, explore the world and become the wealthiest person in Alaska.

Gold Rush: Game A realistic gold mine simulation game. Start with a simple bucket, a pig pot and lease the first bill when you start mining gold. Sit behind the wheels of multiple highly detailed vehicles (bulldozers, drills, front-end loaders, excavators, etc.) and dig gold in one of four unique mining areas with fully deformable terrain. I can.

Your plan is simple: scout and plan your operations, buy a new layer of mining equipment, and grow your gold business. But keep in mind. Every real business faces some obstacles. Machines will break, the weather will affect your operation and increase your interest in rental properties. To achieve your goals, you will have to consider accepting the cycle of the four seasons and making some extra money. The harsh Alaskan winter affects prices and reduces the durability of the machine. Oh, dont be surprised if a bear steals some of your equipment.

Gold Rush: Game It is to dig gold using advanced machinery and take care of the mining company. Familiarize yourself with wash plants, gold nuggets, or wavetables. Manage water pressure and power systems to ensure that your machine is functioning properly. And dont forget to hire some workers and let them grow your business!

If you are a competitive player, we have something a little for you. Rank Mode (Leaderboard) will play against other gold explorers who will be the top this time? In real life, a season usually lasts about a month, so you have plenty of time to compete. Every time you add a unique buff or obstacle to make your experience more attractive, such as discounts on specific claim rentals or increased failure rates for specific items. If you can make it into the top 10, you will have special in-game rewards. What are you looking for? Lets mine gold.

You can choose your own play style. Turn on Easy Mode to explore Alaska (all costs $ 1) or use a globally shared leaderboard to try your luck in the most difficult ranked modes. Be sure to get the game on May 28th, regardless of phone. Check your local PS Store for pricing, availability, and additional details.

wwww.antiqbuyer.com mining & old west antiques

wwww.antiqbuyer.com mining & old west antiques

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I buy, sell, and deal in mining related items from the California Gold Rush Era and those mining antiques that are related to the gold and silver mining that went on in this area from the period spanning roughly from the late 1840's to the first quarter of the 20th century.We are also interested in mining related artifacts and lighting devices from other parts of the country. Especially carbide mining lights, oilwick lights, and miners safety lamps. We use to live in the foothills of California, outside of Placerville and Coloma, where John Marshallfirst discovered gold in 1849 at Sutter Mill. It is an area that is rich in history and old lore, but like the gold it is most famous for, now near depleted of all antiques related to its rich mining heritage. I am seeking all sorts of mining related artifacts having to do with this historic era and locale for inclusion on our antique sales pages at www.Patented-Antiques.com. Below I will briefly discuss and picture a few mine lighting devices and give you a general outline of the sorts of mining related antiques we are interested in. Mine Lighting Lighting in mines was both a vital necessity and dangerous proposition. Through the years several different types of mine lighting evolved, and then disappeared. After the introduction of electricity and battery powered lighting most live flame related ideas were obsolete and relegated to the realm of collectability.The use of live flames from candles used in candlesticks, oil in oilwick lamps, carbide lamps,or even the light provided by Safety or Davey lamps came to an end. All forms of earlier mine lighting are of interest. From the earliest miners candlesticks, to candlesticks that have unusual patented features, or examples with ornate file work or other decoration on them. There are so many different variations that books have been written on the subject. There is also a large reference book covering all forms of Mine Lighting in general by a fellow named Pohs. It is considered the bible in the field of mine light collecting. Miners Candlesticks can be markedwith the maker or mine name.Candlestickswere often made by blacksmiths and so there are many many unique and different examples that can be found. Some are very crude and utilitarian, while others are superb pieces of workmanship and are consideredpieces of art. Unusual candlesticks can have fuse cutters built in to them, or can fold up to be more compact, or even those that come apart (known as take-downs) for easier transport and storage. There are also examples with different means to hold the candle, or candlesticks that have storage area for matches, and even one variety or type that has an area in the loop handle to try and hide a little bit of gold from the mine owners on the way out of the mine. These are called High Graders.Values for candlesticks can range from as low as 25.00-50.00 for common generics to thousands for rare patented examples or other one of a kind examples. There are fakes in the world to contend with as well. Early mine lighting devices known as oil wick lamps or teapots are associated with coal mines. Oil wick lamps came in a myriad of different materials, shapes, sizes, and designsExamples made of different materials from the normal ---- tin or sheet steel, usually command a premium.Lamps made from materials such as aluminum, brass, copper, cast iron and other materials are eagerly sought. Some of these antique lighting devices have interesting designs etched into them, and others have ID plaques from the mine, or from mining organizations such as the Mineworkers of America - MWA. . Those that are different from the norm are of particular interest and can still bring good money while common or typical ones sell for $50.00 or less. If you have any old mine lighting devices or other mining related antiques that you want to sell contact me at [email protected] as many details as possible. Carbide mining lamps were the next source of light to be introduced. It was a means still being used long after electrical lighting was available, but for various reasons was still being developed and used in mining. This source of light was relatively short lived but during their heyday, near the turn of the last century and up until about the 20's there were many different varieties patented and put on the market. Some of these lamps are quite rare today, while others such as those by the three most common makers---Justrite, Auto-Lite, and Guys Dropper---can be found in nearly every antique shop or at every flea market in the country on any given day for $20.00 - $40.00 or so.You can even find modern day Butterfly brand carbide lamps that are made in Hong Kong or China. There are scores of other much less common names available.Pictured on the left is an example of a fairly hard to find carbide that is made of aluminum called the Lumi-Lamp. These aluminum carbide lamps, unless unfired or unused, are usually in rough condition because of the tendency to corrode from the effects of the carbide gas, moisture, and the corrosive nature of the mixture and the gas that they produced when the water was added to the carbide to generate the acetylene gas that was then lit to produce the light. The basic idea was right, looking for a material that was strong, light,and would not rust, but I suppose they did not count on the nature of the gas that was going to be created, and obviously the choice of material was not studied enough. Just above is a nickel plated lamp marked T I P that is a bit different as well. That really stands for It's Trouble Proof. Names of some other good carbide lamps are Wolf, Anton, Funk Bros, What Cheer, X-ray, Victor, and many others.Some of these lamps can sell for many hundreds of dollars if in nice condition. Other mining related antiques that we are interested in buying would be dynamite boxes, dynamite blasting boxes, what are referred to as dynamite cap tins, as well as dynamite crimpers, and other blasting / mining related antiques. I am also interested in antique surveying tools that are related to mining such as unusual plumb bobs or plummets, dip needles or compasses, as well as mining transits with auxiliary scopes, inclinometer levels, and other devices used in the construction and layout of mines. The above mining related antiques are examples of the caliber, condition and quality of these types of antiques that we are primarily interested in. To see some examples of past sales in this category please go to our Mining Past Sales Page If you have quality antique mining related antiques and Old West related antiques that you want to sell, please contact us at [email protected] providing me with as many details as possible. Thank you!! To see many other examples of mining or old west related antiques that we currently have for sale, please go to our sister site at www.Patented-Antiques.com and visit the numerous sale pages you will find there. Thank you!! Larry & Carole

Lighting in mines was both a vital necessity and dangerous proposition. Through the years several different types of mine lighting evolved, and then disappeared. After the introduction of electricity and battery powered lighting most live flame related ideas were obsolete and relegated to the realm of collectability.The use of live flames from candles used in candlesticks, oil in oilwick lamps, carbide lamps,or even the light provided by Safety or Davey lamps came to an end. All forms of earlier mine lighting are of interest. From the earliest miners candlesticks, to candlesticks that have unusual patented features, or examples with ornate file work or other decoration on them. There are so many different variations that books have been written on the subject. There is also a large reference book covering all forms of Mine Lighting in general by a fellow named Pohs. It is considered the bible in the field of mine light collecting. Miners Candlesticks can be markedwith the maker or mine name.Candlestickswere often made by blacksmiths and so there are many many unique and different examples that can be found. Some are very crude and utilitarian, while others are superb pieces of workmanship and are consideredpieces of art. Unusual candlesticks can have fuse cutters built in to them, or can fold up to be more compact, or even those that come apart (known as take-downs) for easier transport and storage. There are also examples with different means to hold the candle, or candlesticks that have storage area for matches, and even one variety or type that has an area in the loop handle to try and hide a little bit of gold from the mine owners on the way out of the mine. These are called High Graders.Values for candlesticks can range from as low as 25.00-50.00 for common generics to thousands for rare patented examples or other one of a kind examples. There are fakes in the world to contend with as well. Early mine lighting devices known as oil wick lamps or teapots are associated with coal mines. Oil wick lamps came in a myriad of different materials, shapes, sizes, and designsExamples made of different materials from the normal ---- tin or sheet steel, usually command a premium.Lamps made from materials such as aluminum, brass, copper, cast iron and other materials are eagerly sought. Some of these antique lighting devices have interesting designs etched into them, and others have ID plaques from the mine, or from mining organizations such as the Mineworkers of America - MWA. . Those that are different from the norm are of particular interest and can still bring good money while common or typical ones sell for $50.00 or less.

If you have any old mine lighting devices or other mining related antiques that you want to sell contact me at [email protected] as many details as possible. Carbide mining lamps were the next source of light to be introduced. It was a means still being used long after electrical lighting was available, but for various reasons was still being developed and used in mining. This source of light was relatively short lived but during their heyday, near the turn of the last century and up until about the 20's there were many different varieties patented and put on the market. Some of these lamps are quite rare today, while others such as those by the three most common makers---Justrite, Auto-Lite, and Guys Dropper---can be found in nearly every antique shop or at every flea market in the country on any given day for $20.00 - $40.00 or so.You can even find modern day Butterfly brand carbide lamps that are made in Hong Kong or China. There are scores of other much less common names available.Pictured on the left is an example of a fairly hard to find carbide that is made of aluminum called the Lumi-Lamp. These aluminum carbide lamps, unless unfired or unused, are usually in rough condition because of the tendency to corrode from the effects of the carbide gas, moisture, and the corrosive nature of the mixture and the gas that they produced when the water was added to the carbide to generate the acetylene gas that was then lit to produce the light. The basic idea was right, looking for a material that was strong, light,and would not rust, but I suppose they did not count on the nature of the gas that was going to be created, and obviously the choice of material was not studied enough. Just above is a nickel plated lamp marked T I P that is a bit different as well. That really stands for It's Trouble Proof. Names of some other good carbide lamps are Wolf, Anton, Funk Bros, What Cheer, X-ray, Victor, and many others.Some of these lamps can sell for many hundreds of dollars if in nice condition. Other mining related antiques that we are interested in buying would be dynamite boxes, dynamite blasting boxes, what are referred to as dynamite cap tins, as well as dynamite crimpers, and other blasting / mining related antiques. I am also interested in antique surveying tools that are related to mining such as unusual plumb bobs or plummets, dip needles or compasses, as well as mining transits with auxiliary scopes, inclinometer levels, and other devices used in the construction and layout of mines. The above mining related antiques are examples of the caliber, condition and quality of these types of antiques that we are primarily interested in. To see some examples of past sales in this category please go to our Mining Past Sales Page If you have quality antique mining related antiques and Old West related antiques that you want to sell, please contact us at [email protected] providing me with as many details as possible. Thank you!! To see many other examples of mining or old west related antiques that we currently have for sale, please go to our sister site at www.Patented-Antiques.com and visit the numerous sale pages you will find there. Thank you!! Larry & Carole

Carbide mining lamps were the next source of light to be introduced. It was a means still being used long after electrical lighting was available, but for various reasons was still being developed and used in mining. This source of light was relatively short lived but during their heyday, near the turn of the last century and up until about the 20's there were many different varieties patented and put on the market. Some of these lamps are quite rare today, while others such as those by the three most common makers---Justrite, Auto-Lite, and Guys Dropper---can be found in nearly every antique shop or at every flea market in the country on any given day for $20.00 - $40.00 or so.You can even find modern day Butterfly brand carbide lamps that are made in Hong Kong or China. There are scores of other much less common names available.Pictured on the left is an example of a fairly hard to find carbide that is made of aluminum called the Lumi-Lamp. These aluminum carbide lamps, unless unfired or unused, are usually in rough condition because of the tendency to corrode from the effects of the carbide gas, moisture, and the corrosive nature of the mixture and the gas that they produced when the water was added to the carbide to generate the acetylene gas that was then lit to produce the light. The basic idea was right, looking for a material that was strong, light,and would not rust, but I suppose they did not count on the nature of the gas that was going to be created, and obviously the choice of material was not studied enough. Just above is a nickel plated lamp marked T I P that is a bit different as well. That really stands for It's Trouble Proof. Names of some other good carbide lamps are Wolf, Anton, Funk Bros, What Cheer, X-ray, Victor, and many others.Some of these lamps can sell for many hundreds of dollars if in nice condition. Other mining related antiques that we are interested in buying would be dynamite boxes, dynamite blasting boxes, what are referred to as dynamite cap tins, as well as dynamite crimpers, and other blasting / mining related antiques. I am also interested in antique surveying tools that are related to mining such as unusual plumb bobs or plummets, dip needles or compasses, as well as mining transits with auxiliary scopes, inclinometer levels, and other devices used in the construction and layout of mines.

The above mining related antiques are examples of the caliber, condition and quality of these types of antiques that we are primarily interested in. To see some examples of past sales in this category please go to our Mining Past Sales Page If you have quality antique mining related antiques and Old West related antiques that you want to sell, please contact us at [email protected] providing me with as many details as possible. Thank you!! To see many other examples of mining or old west related antiques that we currently have for sale, please go to our sister site at www.Patented-Antiques.com and visit the numerous sale pages you will find there. Thank you!! Larry & Carole

If you have quality antique mining related antiques and Old West related antiques that you want to sell, please contact us at [email protected] providing me with as many details as possible. Thank you!! To see many other examples of mining or old west related antiques that we currently have for sale, please go to our sister site at www.Patented-Antiques.com and visit the numerous sale pages you will find there.

hit mining simulator 'gold rush: the game' arrives on ps, xbox - times24h - international breaking news

hit mining simulator 'gold rush: the game' arrives on ps, xbox - times24h - international breaking news

Game developers Code Horizon, together with co-publisher PlayWay SA, returns with the console version of this mining simulator for the PlayStation 4/5 and Xbox One/X|S. After garnering a wide reach and an ever-expanding player base for PC, the game makers are porting it to consoles for more players to enjoy.

The purpose of the game is simple, start as a lowly gold miner equipped with a bucket and a hog pan. Then, work your way up the ladder, earning better tools and more advanced equipment, as you rise to be the next gold tycoon..

Utilizing similar game mechanics asits PC counterpart, the console version of Gold Rush: The Game allows players to explore their surroundings and interact with objects around them. It begins with a small and manual mining setup, allowing you to start and secure your first claim.

As you progress in the game, you start getting access to more advanced equipment such as bulldozers, tractors, excavators, and more. You can now build your mining operations and start digging for gold. Taking inspiration from the hit Discovery Channel of the same name, Gold Rush: The Game, makes sure that its not all mining songs and findinggold. Instead, it shows players the intricacies of the industry, including prospecting, maintenance, and striking deals.

The game has an interactive map that players can use to find a spot to start digging. Aside from showing locations and territories, it also shows where boreholes are, allowing players to identify unadulterated patches of land. Furthermore, as players move forward and obtain more complex equipment, they do their maintenance and upkeep tasks. Check your items conditions, troubleshoot where failures come from, and replace damaged parts. From rollers, chains, hoses, belts to buckets and motors you will be in charge of making sure everything works as it should and find you that elusive gold.

Lastly, updates in the game have included weather and season cycles into the game. Therefore, players will also have to adapt and contend with changing weather conditions aside from managing laborers and equipment. Needless to say, the presence of rain or snow would affect gameplay not only in terms of visibility but in the behavior of the equipment on the site.

The Code Horizon and PlayWay SA game is based on the reality television series Gold Rush, which first aired on the Discovery Channel on December 3, 2010. It follows the exploits of various family-run mining companies, including prospecting in lesser-known regions of the US and Canada. It later expanded to cover mining efforts in South America and other parts of North America.

Since its pilot episode, Gold Rush has aired more than 250 episodes across 11 seasons. As a smash hit for the Discovery Channel, its first-season finale became the most-watch Friday night show in the United States for the demographics of males 18 to 49 and females 25 to 54.

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