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grinding mills in australia vs usa sikkim australia

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sag mill grinding circuit design

sag mill grinding circuit design

AG and SAG mills are now the primary unit operation for the majority of large grinding circuits, and form the basis for a variety of circuit configurations. SAG circuits are common in the industry based on:

Though some trepidation concerning AG or SAG circuits accompanied design studies for some lime, such circuits are now well understood, and there is a substantial body of knowledge on circuit design as well as abundant information that can be used for bench-marking of similar plants in similar applications. Because SAG mills rely both on the ore itself as grinding media (to varying degrees) and on ore-dependent unit power requirements for milling to the transfer size, throughput in SAG circuits are variable. Relative to other comminution machines in the primary role. SAG mill operation is more dynamic, and typically requires a higher degree of process control sophistication. Though more complex in AG/ SAG circuits relative to the crushing plants they have largely replaced, these issues are well understood in contemporary applications.

AG/SAG mills grindore through impact breakage, attrition breakage, and abrasion of the ore serving as media. Autogenous circuits require an ore of suitable competency (or fractions within the ore of suitable competency) to serve as media. SAG circuits may employ low to relatively high ball charges (ranging from 2% to 22%, expressed as volumetric mill filling) to augment autogenous media. Higher ball charges shift the breakage mode away from attrition and abrasionbreakage toward impact breakage; as a result, AG milling produces a finer grind than SAG milling for a given ore and otherwise equal operating conditions. The following circuits are common in the gold industry:

Common convention generally refers to high-aspect ratio mills as SAG mills (with diameter to effective grinding length ratios of 3:1 to 1:1), low-aspect ratio mills (generally, a mill with a significantly longer length than diameter) are also worth noting. Such mills are common in South African operations; mills are sometimes referred to as tube mills or ROM ball mills and are also operated both autogenously and semi-autogenously. Many of these mills operate at higher mill speeds (nominally 90% of critical speed) and often use grid liners to form an autogenous liner surface. These mills typically grind ROM ore in a single stage. A large example of such a mill was converted from a single-stage milling application to a semi autogenous ball-mill-crushing (SABC) circuit, and the application is well described. This refers to high-aspect AG/SAG mills.

With a higher density mill charge. SAG mills have a higher installed power density for a given plant footprint relative to AC mills. With the combination of finer grind and a lower installed power density (based on the lower density of the mill charge), a typical AG mill has a lower throughput, a lower power draw, and produces a finer grind. These factors often translate to a higher unit power input (kWh/t) than an SAG circuit milling the same ore. but at a higher power efficiency (often assessed by the operating work index OWi, which if used most objectively, should be corrected by one of a number of techniques for varying amounts of fines between the two milling operations).

In the presence of suitable ore, an autogenous circuit can provide substantial operating cost savings due to a reduction in grinding media expenditure and liner wear. In broad terms, this makes SAG mills less expensive to build (in terms of unit capital cost per ton of throughput) than AG mills but more expensive to operate (as a result of increased grinding media and liner costs, and in many cases, lower power efficiency). SAG circuits are less susceptible to substantial fluctuations due to feed variation than AG mills and are more stable to operate. AG circuits are more frequently (but not exclusively) installed in circuits with high ore densities. A small steel charge addition to an AG mill can boost throughput, result in more stable operations, typically at the consequence of a coarser grind and higher operating costs. An AG circuit is often designed to accommodate a degree of steel media for circuit flexibility. AG mills (or SAG mills with low ball charges) are often used in single-stage grinding applications.

Based on their higher throughput and coarser grind relative to AG mills, it is more common for SAG mills to he used as the primary stage of grinding, followed by a second stage of milling. AG/SAG circuits producing a fine grind (particularly single-stage grinding applications) are often closed with hydrocyclones. Circuits producing a coarser grinds often classify mill discharge with screens. For circuits classifying mill discharge at a coarse size (coarser than approximately 10 mm), trommels can also be considered to classify mill discharge. Trommels are less favorable in applications requiring high classification efficiencies and can be constrained by available surface area for high-throughput mills. Regardless of classification equipment (hydrocyclone, screen, or trommel), oversize can be returned to the mill, or directed to a separate stage of comminution.

Many large mills around the world (Esperanza with a 12.8 m mill. Cadia and Collahuasi with 12.2-m mills, and Antamina. Escondida #IV. PT Freeport Indonesia, and others with 11.6-m mills) have installed SAG mills of 20 MW. Gearless drives (wrap-around motors) are typically used for large mills, with mills of 25 MW or larger having been designed. Several circuits have single-line design capacities exceeding 100,000 TPD. A large SAG installation (with pebble crusher product combining with SAG discharge and feeding screens) is depicted here below, with the corresponding process flowsheet presented in Figure 17.9.

Adding pebble crushing as a unit operation is the most common variant to closed-circuit AG/SAG milling (instead of direct recycle of oversize material ). The efficiency benefits (both in terms of grinding efficiency and in capital efficiency through incremental throughput) are well recognized. Pebble crushers are effective at reducing the buildup of critical-sized material in the mill load. Critical-sized particles are those where the product of the mill feed-size distribution and the mill breakage rates result in a buildup of a size range of material in the mill load, the accumulation of which limits the ability of the mill to accept new feed. While critical-size could be of any dimension, it is most typically synonymous with pebble-crusher feed, with a size range of 1375 mm. Critical-sized particles can result from a simple failure of a mills breakage rates to exceed the breakage rate of incoming particles, and particles generated when breaking larger particles. Alternatively, a second type of buildup of critical-sized material can result due to a combination of rock types in the feed that have differing breakage properties. In this case, the harder fraction of the mill feed builds up in the mill load, againrestricting throughput. Examples of materials in this category include diorites, chert, and andesite. When buildup of these materials does occur, pebble crushing can improve mill throughput even more dramatically than when the critically sized fraction results purely from a breakage rate deficit alone. For these ore types, a pebble-crushing circuit is tin imperative for efficient circuit operation.

Currently, every AG/SAG flowsheet evaluation is likely to consider the inclusion of a pebble crusher circuit. Flowsheets that do not elect to include pebble crushing at construction and commissioning may include provisions for future retrofitting a pebble-crushing circuit. Important aspects of pebble crusher circuit design include:

The standard destination for crushed pebbles has been to return them to SAG feed. However, open circuiting the SAG mill by feeding crushed pebbles directly to a ball-mill circuit is often considered as a technique to increase SAG throughput. An option to do both can allow balancing the primary and secondary milling sections by having the ability to return crushed pebbles to SAG feed as per a conventional flowsheet, or to the SAG discharge. Such a circuit is depicted here on the right. By combining with SAG discharge and screening on the SAG discharge screens, top size control to the ball-mill circuit feed is maintained while still unloading the SAG circuit (Mosher et al, 2006). A variant of this method is to direct pebble-crushing circuit product to the ball-mill sump for secondary milling: while convenient, this has the disadvantage of not controlling the top size of feed to the ball-mill circuit. There have also been pioneer installations that have installed HPGRs as a second stage of pebble crushing.

The unit power requirement for SAG milling (both individually and as a fraction of the total circuit power) is worthy of comment. It can be very difficult operationally to trade grind for throughput in an SAG circuitonce designed and constructed for a given circuit configuration, an SAG mill circuit has limited flexibility to deliver varying product sizes, and a relatively fixed unit power input for a given ore type is typically required in the SAG mill. This is particularly true for those SAG circuits designed with a coarse closing size. As a result, under-sizing an SAG mill has disastrous results on throughput across the industry, there are numerous examples of the SAG mill emerging as the circuit bottleneck. On the other hand, over-sizing an SAG circuit can be a poor utilization of capital (or an opportunity for future expansion!).

Traditionally, many engineers approached SAG circuit design as a division of the total power between the SAG circuit and ball-mill circuit, often at an arbitrary power split. If done without due consideration to ore characteristics, benchmarks against comparable operating circuits, and other aspects of detailed design (including steady-state tests, simulation, and experience), an arbitrary power split between circuits ignores the critical decision of determining the required unit power in SAG milling. As such, it exposes the circuit to risk in terms of failing to meet throughput targets if insufficient SAG power is installed. Rather than design the SAG circuit with an arbitrary fraction of total circuit power, it is more useful to base the required SAG mill size on the product of the unit power requirement for the ore and the desired throughput. Subsequently, the size of the secondary milling circuit is then sized based on the amount of finish grinding for the SAG circuit product that is required. Restated, the designed SAG mill size and operating conditions typically control circuit throughput, while the ball-mill circuit installed power controls the final grind size.

The effect of feed hardness is the most significant driver for AG/SAG performance: with variations in ore hardness come variations in circuit throughput. The effect of feed size is marked, with both larger and finer feed sizes having a significant effect on throughput. With SAG mills, the response is typically that for coarser ores, throughput declines, and vice versa. However, for AG mills, there are number of case histories where mills failed to consistently meet throughput targets due to a lack of coarse media. Compounding the challenge of feed size is the fact that for many ores, the overall coarseness of the primary crusher product is correlated to feed hardness. Larger, more competent material consumes mill volume and limits throughput.

A number of operations have implemented a secondary crushing circuit prior to the SAG circuit for further comminution of primary crusher product. Such a circuit can counteract the effects of harder ore. coarser ore. decrease the size of SAG mill required, or rectify poor throughput due to an undersized SAG circuit. Notably, harder ore often presents itself to the SAG circuit as coarser than softer oreless comminution is produced in blasting and primary crushing, and therefore the impact on SAG throughput is compounded.

Circuits that have used or do use secondary crushing/SAG pre-crush include Troilus (Canada), Kidston (Australia), Ray (USA), Porgera (PNG). Granny Smith (Australia), Geita Gold (Tanzania), St Ives (Australia), and KCGM (Australia). Occasionally, secondary crushing is included in the original design but is often added as an additional circuit to account for harder ore (either harder than planned or becoming harder as the deposit is developed) or as a capital-efficient mechanism to boost throughput in an existing circuit. Such a flowsheet is not without its drawbacks. Not surprisingly, some of the advantages of SAG milling are reduced in terms of increased liner wear and increased maintenance costs. Also, pre-crush can lead to an increase in mid-sized material, overloading of pebble circuits, and challenges in controlling recycle loads. In certain circuits, the loss of top-size material can lead to decreased throughput. It is now widespread enough to be a standard circuit variant and is often considered as an option in trade-off studies. At the other end of the spectrum is the concept of feeding AG mills with as coarse a primary crusher product as possible.

The overall circuit configuration can guide selection of die classification method of primary circuit product. Screening is more successful than trommel classification for circuits with pebble crushing, particularly for those with larger mills. Single-stage AG/SAG circuits are most often closed with hydrocyclones.

To a more significant degree than in other comminution devices, liner design and configuration can have a substantial effect on mill performance. In general terms, lifter spacing and angle, grate open area and aperture size, and pulp lifter design and capacity must be considered. Each of these topics has had a considerable amount of research, and numerous case studies of evolutionary liner design have been published. Based on experience, mill-liner designs have moved toward more open-shell lifter spacing, increased pulp lifter volumetric capacity, and a grate design to facilitate maximizing both pebble-crushing circuit utilization and SAG mill capacity. As a guideline, mill throughput is maximized with shell lifters between ratios of 2.5:1 and 5.0:1. This ratio range is stated without reference to face angle; in general terms, and at equivalent spacing-to-height ratios, lifters with greater face-angle relief will have less packing problems when new, but experience higher wear rates than those with a steeper face angle. Pulp-lifter design can be a significant consideration for SAG mills, particularly for large mills. As mill sizes increases, the required volumetric capacity of the pulp lifters grows proportionally to mill volume. Since AG/SAG mill volume is roughly proportional to the mill radius cubed (at typical mill lengths) while the available cross-sectional area grows only as the radius squared, pulp lifters must become more efficient at transferring slurry in larger mills. Mills with pebble-crushing circuits will require grates with larger apertures to feed the circuit.

No discussion of SAG milling would be complete without mention of refining. Unlike a concentrator with multiple grinding lines, conducting SAG mill maintenance shuts down an entire concentrator, so there is a tremendous focus on minimizing required maintenance time; the reline timeline often represents the critical path of a shutdown (but typically does not dominate a shutdown in terms of total maintenance effort).

Reline times are a function of the number of pieces to be changed and the time required per piece. Advances in casting and development of progressively larger lining machines have allowed larger and larger individual liner pieces.

While improvements in this area will continue, the physical size limit of the feed trunnion and the ability to maneuver parts are increasingly limiting factors, particularly in large mills. The other portion of the equation for reline times is time per piece, and performance in this area is a function of planning, training/skill level, and equipment.

Abroad range of AG/SAG circuit configurations are in operation. Very large line plants have been designed, constructed, and operated. The circuits have demonstrated reliability, high overall availabilities, streamlined maintenance shutdowns, and efficient operation. AG/SAG circuits can handle a broad range of feed sizes, as well as sticky, clayey ores (which challenge other circuit configurations). Relative to crushing plants, wear media use is reduced, and plants run at higher availabilities. Circuits, however, are more sensitive to variations in circuit feed characteristics of hardness and size distribution; unlike crushing plants for which throughput is largely volumetrically controlled. AG/SAG throughput is defined by the unit power required to grindthe ore to the closing size attained in the circuit. Very hard ores can severely constrain AG/SAG mill throughput. In such cases, the circuits can become capital inefficient (in terms of the size and number of primary milling units required) and can require more total power input relative to alternative comminution flowsheets. A higher degree of operator skill is typically required of AG/SAG circuit operation, and more advanced process control is required to maintain steady-state operation, with different operator/advanced process control regimens required based on different ore types.

Many mills have been built based on data from inadequate sampling or from insufficient tests. With the cost of many mills exceeding several hundred million dollars, it is mandatory that geologists, mining engineers and metallurgists work together to prepare representative samples for testing. Simple repeatable work index tests are usually sufficient for rod mill and ball mill tests but pilot plant tests on 50-100 tons of ore are frequently necessary for autogenous or semiautogenous mills.

Preparation and selection of the test sample is of utmost importance. Procedures for autogenous and semiautogenous mill pilot plant tests are relatively simple for those experienced in running them. Reliable and repeatable results can be obtained if simple fundamental procedures are followed.

The design of large mills has become increasingly more complicated as the size has increased and there is little doubt that without sophisticated design procedures such as the use of the Finite Element method the required factors of safety would make large mills prohibitively expensive.

In the past the design of small mills, up to +/- 2,5 metres diameter, was carried out using empirical formulae with relatively large factors of safety. As the diameter and length of mills increased several critical problem areas were identified. One of the most important was the severe stressing which took place at the connection of the mill shell and the trunnion bearing end plates, which is further aggravated by the considerable distortion of the shell and the bearing journals due to the dynamic load effect of the rotating mill with a heavy mass of ore and pulp being lifted and dropped as the grinding process took place. Incidentally the design calculation of the deformations of journal and mill shell is based on static conditions, the influence of the rotating mass being of less importance. An indication of shell and journal distortion is shown in Figure 1.

Investigations carried out by Polysius/Aerofall revealed that practical manufacturing considerations dictated some aspects of trunnion end design. Whereas the thickness of the trunnion in the case of small diameter mills was dictated by foundry practice which required a minimum thickness of metal the opposite was the case in the design of large diameter mills where the emphasis was not to exceed a maximum thickness both from the mass/casting temperature point of view and the cost aspect.

While the deformation of shell and end plates was acceptable in the case of small mills due in some extent to the over stiff construction, the deformation in the large, more flexible, mills is relatively high. The ratio of the trunnion thickness to trunnion diameter in a mill of 2,134 m diameter is almost twice that of a mill of 5,8 m diameter, i.e. a ratio (T/D) of 0,116 to 0,069 for the large mill.

The use of large memory high speed computers coupled with finite element methods provides the means of performing stress calculations with a high degree of accuracy even for the complex structures of large mills. The precision with which the stress values can be predicted makes the use of safety factors based on empirical formulae generally unnecessary.

In the case of large diameter trunnion bearing mills the distortion which takes place is further compounded by the fact that the deformation varies across the width of the bearing journal due to the fact that the end of the journal attached to the mill end plate is less liable to distortion than the outlet free end of the journal. This raises serious complications as far as the development of the hydrodynamic fluid oil film of the bearing is concerned since the minimum oil gap may be only 0,05 mm.

Obviously a thinner oil film is adequate where the deformation of the journal is less while at the unsecured end of the journal widely varying oil film thickness is necessary to maintain the correct oil pressure to support the mill. A solution to this problem has been the advent of the hydrostatic bearing with a supply of high pressure oil pumped continuously into the bearings.

Incorporating the mill bearing journals as part of the mill shell reduced the magnitude of the problem of distortion although there is always out of round deformation of the shell. The variation across the width of the journal surface is less pronounced than is the case with the trunnion bearing.

The replacement of a single bearing with a number of individual self adjusting bearing pads which together support the mill has lessened the undesirable effects of deformation while improving the efficiency of the bearing.

The ability of each individual bearing-pad to adjust automatically to a more localised area of the shell journal gives rise to improved contact of the oil film with both the bearing surface and the journal and in the case of hydrodynamic oil systems makes it unnecessary to supply oil at constant high pressure once the oil film has been established. A cross-section of a slipper pad bearing is shown in Figure 3.

Kidstons orebody consists of 44.2 million tonnes graded at 1.79 g/t gold and 2.22 g/t silver. Production commenced in January, 1985, and despite a number of control, mechanical and electrical problems, each month has seen a steady improvement in plant performance to a current level of over ninety percent rated capacity.

The grinding circuit comprises one 8530 mm diameter x 3650 mm semi-autogenous mill driven by a 3954 kW variable speed dc motor, and one 5030 mm diameter x 8340 mm secondary ball mill driven by a 3730 kW synchronous motor. Four 1067 x 2400 mm vibrating feeders under the coarse ore stockpile feed the SAG mill via a 1067 mm feed belt equipped with a belt scale. Feed rate was initially controlled by the SAG mill power draw with bearing pressure as override.

Integral with the grinding circuit is a 1500 cubic meter capacity agitated surge tank equipped with level sensors and variable speed pumps. This acts as a buffer between the grinding circuit and the flow rate sensitive cycloning and thickening sections.

The Kidston plant was designed to process 7500 tpd fresh ore of average hardness; but to optimise profit during the first two years of operation when softer oxide ore will be treated, the process equipment was sized to handle a throughput of up to 14 000 tpd. Some of the equipment, therefore, will become standby units at the normal throughputs of 7 000 to 8 000 tpd, or additional milling capacity may be installed.

The SAG mill incorporates a design which allowed expedient manufacturing to high quality specifications, achieved by selecting a shell to head to trunnion configuration of solid elements bolted together. This eliminates difficult to fabricate and inspect areas such as a fabricated head welded to shell plate, fabricated ribbed heads, plate or casting welded to the head in the knuckle area and transition between the head and trunnion.

Considerable variation in ore hardness, the late commissioning of much of the instrumentation and an eagerness to maximise mill throughput led to frequent mill overloading during the first four months of operation. The natural operator over-reaction to overloads resulted numerous mill grindouts, about sixteen hours in total, which in turn were largely responsible for grate failure and severe liner peening. First evidence of grate failure occurred at 678 000 tonnes throughput, and at 850 000 tonnes, after three grates had been replaced on separate occasions, the remaining 25 were renewed. The cylinder liners were so badly peened at this stage that no liner edge could be discerned except under very close scrutiny and grate apertures had closed to 48 percent of their original open area.

The original SAG mill control loop, a mill motor power draw set point of 5200 Amperes controlling the coarse ore feeder speeds, was soon found to give excessive variation in the mill ore charge volume and somewhat less than optimal power draw.

The armature, weighing 19 tonnes, together with the top half magnet frame, were trucked two thousand kilometers to Brisbane for rewinding and repairs. The mill was turning again on January 24 after a total elapsed downtime of 14 days. After a twelve day stoppage due to a statewide power dispute in February, the mill settled down to a fairly normal operation, apart from some minor problems with alarm monitoring causing a few spurious trips. One cause of the mysterious stoppages was tracked down to the cubicle door interlocks which stuttered whenever the mining department fired a bigger than usual blast.

The open trunnion bearings are sealed with a rubber ring which proved ineffective in preventing ingress of water, and occasionally solids, from feed chute chokes and spillages. Contamination and emulsification of the oil with subsequent filter choking has been responsible for nearly eighteen percent of SAG mill circuit shutdowns. Despite the very high levels of contamination, no damage has been sustained by the bearings which has at least proved the effectiveness of the filters and other protection devices.

Design changes to date have, predictably, mostly concentrated on improving liner life and minimising discharge grate damage. Four discharge grates with thickened ends have performed satisfactorily and a Mk3 version with separate lifters and 20 mm apertures is currently being cast by Minneapolis Electric.

Cylinder liners will continue to be replaced with high profile lifters only on a complete reline basis. While there is the problem of reduced milling capacity with reduced lifter height towards the end of liner life, it is hoped to largely offset this by operating at higher mill speeds.

Mill feed chute liner life continues to be a problem. The original chrome-moly liners lasted some three months and a subsequent trial with 75 mm thick clamped Linhard (rubber) liners turned in a rather dismal life of three weeks.

grinding mill design & ball mill manufacturer

grinding mill design & ball mill manufacturer

All Grinding Mill & Ball Mill Manufacturers understand the object of the grinding process is a mechanical reduction in size of crushable material. Grinding can be undertaken in many ways. The most common way for high capacity industrial purposes is to use a tumbling charge of grinding media in a rotating cylinder or drum. The fragmentation of the material in that charge occurs through pressure, impact, and abrasion.

The choice of mill design depends on the particle size distribution in the feed and in the product wanted. Often the grinding is more economic when executed in a primary step, followed by a secondary step, giving a fine size product.

C=central trunnion discharge P=peripheral discharge R=spherical roller trunnion bearing, feed end H=hydrostatic shoe bearing, feed end R=spherical roller trunnion bearing, discharge end K=ring gear and pinion drive

Type CHRK is designed for primary autogenous grinding, where the large feed opening requires a hydrostatic trunnion shoe bearing. Small and batch grinding mills, with a diameter of 700 mm and more, are available. These mills are of a special design and described on special request by allBall Mill Manufacturers.

The different types of grinding mills are based on the different types of tumbling media that can be used: steel rods (rod mills), steel balls (ball mills), and rock material (autogenous mills, pebble mills).

The grinding charge in a rod mill consists of straight steel rods with an initial diameter of 50-100 mm. The length of the rods is equal to the shell length inside the head linings minus about 150 mm. The rods are fed through the discharge trunnion opening. On bigger mills, which need heavy rods, the rod charging is made with a pneumatic or manual operated rod charging device. The mill must be stopped every day or every second day for a few minutes in order to add new rods and at the same time pick out broken rod pieces.

As the heavy rod charge transmits a considerable force to each rod, a rod mill can not be built too big. A shell length above 6100 mm can not be recommended. As the length to diameter ratio of the mill should be in the range of 1,2-1,5, the biggest rod mill will convert maximum 1500 kW.

Rod mills are used for primary grinding of materials with a top size of 20-30 mm (somewhat higher for soft materials). The production of fines is low and consequently a rod mill is the right machine when a steep particle size distribution curve is desired. A product with 80% minus 500 microns can be obtained in an economical manner.

The grinding charge in a ball mill consist of cast or forged steel balls. These balls are fed together with the feed and consequently ball mills can be in operation for months without stopping. The ball size is often in the diameter range of 20-75 mm.

The biggest size is chosen when the mill is used as a primary grinding mill. For fine grinding of e.g. sands, balls can be replaced by cylpebs, which are heat treated steel cylinders with a diameter of 12-40 mm and with the same length as the diameter.

Ball mills are often used as secondary grinding mills and for regrinding of middlings in concentrators. Ball mills can be of the overflow or of the grate discharge type. Overflow discharge mills are used when a product with high specific surface is wanted, without any respect to the particle size distribution curve. Overflow discharge mills give a final product in an open circuit. Grate discharge mills are used when the grinding energy shall be concentrated to the coarse particles without production of slimes. In order to get a steep particle size distribution curve, the mill is used in closed circuit with some kind of classifier and the coarse particles known as classifier underflow are recycled. Furthermore, it should be observed that a grate discharge ball mill converts about 20% more energy than an overflow discharge mill with the same shell dimensions.

Ball mill shells are often furnished with two manholes. Ball mills with small balls or cylpebs can produce the finest product of all tumbling mills. 80% minus 74 microns is a normal requirement from the concentrators.The CRRK series of wet grinding ball mills are tabulatedbelow.

No steel grinding media is used in a fully autogenous mill. When choosing primary autogenous grinding, run of mine ore up to 200-300 mm in size is fed to the mill. When using a crushing step before the grinding, the crusher setting should be 150-200 mm. The feed trunnion opening must be large enough to avoid plugging. The biggest pieces in the mill are important for the size reduction of middle size pieces, which in their turn are important for the finer grinding. Thus the tendency of the material to be reduced in size by pressure, impact, and abrasion is a very important question when primary autogenous grinding is proposed.

When autogenous grinding is used in the second grinding step, the grinding media is size-controlled and often in the range of 30-70 mm. This size is called pebbles and screened out in the crushing station and fed to the mill in controlled proportion to the mill power. The pebble weight is 5-25% of the total feed to the plant, depending on the strength of the pebbles. Sometimes waste rock of high strength is used as pebbles.

Pebble mills should always be of the grate discharge type. The energy that can be converted in a mill depends on the total weight of the grinding charge. Consequently, pebble mills convert less power per mill volume unit than rod and ball mills.

High quality steel rods and balls are a considerable part of the operating costs. Autogenous grinding should, therefore, be considered and tested when a new plant shall be designed. As a grinding mill is built to last for decades, it is more important to watch the operation costs than the price of the mill installation. The CRRK series of wet grinding pebble mills are tabulated below.

Wet grinding is definitely the most usual method of grinding minerals as it incorporates many advantages compared to dry grinding. A requirement is, however, that water is available and that waste water, that can not be recirculated, can be removed from the plant without any environmental problems. Generally, the choice depends on whether the following processing is wet or dry.

When grinding to a certain specific surface area, wet grinding has a lower power demand than dry grinding. On the other hand, the wear of mill lining and grinding media is lower in dry grinding. Thus dry grinding can be less costly.

The feed to a dry grinding system must be dried if the moisture content is high. A ball mill is more sensitive to clogging than a rod mill. An air stream through the mill can reduce the moisture content and thus make a dry grinding possible in certain applications.

Due to the hindering effect that the ball charge gives to the material flow in dry grinding, the ball charge is not more than 28-35% of the mill volume. This should be compared with 40-45% in wet grinding. The expression used for this phenomenon is that the charge in a dry grinding mill is swollen.

Big dry grinding ball mills are often two-compartment mills, with big balls in the first compartment and small balls or cylpebs in the second one. An extra grate wall is used to separate the two charges.

The efficiency of wet grinding is affected by the percentage of solids. If the pulp is too thick, the grinding media becomes covered by too thick a layer of material, which hinders grinding. The opposite effect may be obtained if the dilution is too high, and this may also reduce the grinding efficiency. A high degree of dilution may sometimes be desirable in order to suppress excessive slime formation.

The specific power required for a certain grinding operation, usually expressed in kWh/ton, is a function of both the increase in the specific surface of the material (expressed in cm/cm or cm/g) and of the grinding resistance of the material. This can be expressed by the formula

where c is a material constant representing the grinding resistance, and So and S are the specific surfaces of the material before and after the grinding operation respectively. The formula is an expression of Rittingers Law which is shown by tests to be reasonably accurate up to a specific surface of 10,000 cm/cm.

When the grinding resistance c has been determined by trial grinding to laboratory scale, the net power E required for each grinding stage desired may be determined by the formula, at least as long as Rittingers Law is valid. If grinding is to be carried out not to a certain specific surface S but to a certain particle size k, the correlation between S and k must be determined. The particle size is often expressed in terms of particle size at e.g. 95, 90 or 80% quantity passing and is denoted k95, k90 or k80.

where E =the specific power consumption expressed in kWh/short ton. Eo = a proportionality and work factor called work index k80p = particle size of the product at 80% passage (micron) k80f =the corresponding value for the raw material (micron)

The value of Eo is a function of the physical properties of the raw material, the screen analyses of the product and raw material respectively, and the size of the mill. The value for easily-ground materials is around 7, while for materials that have a high grinding resistance the value is around 17.

Eo is correlated to a certain reduction ratio, mill diameter etc. Corrections must be made for each case. The simplest method of calculating the specific power consumption is test grinding in a laboratory mill, and comparison of the results with a known reference material. The sample is ground in batches for 3, 6,12 minutes, a screen analysis is carried out after each period, after which the specific surface is determined. A good estimate of the grinding characteristics of the sample can be obtained by comparison of the specific surfaces with corresponding values for the reference material.

When the net power required has been determined, an allowance is made for mechanical losses. The gross power requirement thus arrived at, should with a satisfactory margin be utilised by the mill selected.

The critical speed of a rotating mill is the RPM at which a grinding medium will begin to centrifuge, namely will start rotating with the mill and therefore cease to carry out useful work. This will occur at an RPM of ncr, which may be determined by the formula

where D is the inside diameter in meters of the mill. Mills are driven in practice at a speed corresponding to 60-80% of the critical speed, the choice of speed being influenced by economical considerations. Within that range the power is nearly proportional to the speed.

The charge volume in the case of rod and ball mills is a measure of the proportion of the mill body that is filled by rods or balls. When the mill is stationary, raw material and liquid should fill the voids between the grinding media, in order that these should be fully utilized.

Maximum mill efficiency is reached at a charge volume of approximately 55%, but for a number of reasons 45-50% is seldom exceeded. The efficiency curve is in any case quite flat about the maximum. In overflow mills the charge volume is usually 40%, while there is a greater choice in the case of grate discharge mills.

For coarse grinding in rod mills, the rods used have a diameter of 50-100 mm and their lengths are approx. 150 mm below the effective inside shell length. Rods will break when they have been worn down to about 20 mm and broken rods must from time to time be taken out of the mill since otherwise they will reduce the mill capacity and may cause blockage through piling up. The first rod charge should also contain a number of rods of smaller diameter.

It may be necessary to charge the mill with rods of smaller diameter when fine grinding is to be carried out in a rod mill. Experience shows that the size of the grinding media should bear a definite relationship to the size of both the raw material and the finished product in order that optimum grinding may be achieved. The largest grinding media must be able to crush and grind the largest pieces of rock, while on the other hand the grinding media should be as small as possible since the total active surface increases in inverse proportion to the diameter.

A crushed mineral whose largest particles pass a screen with 25 x 25 mm apertures shall be ground to approx. 95% passing 0.1 mm in a 2.9 x 3.2 m ball mill of 35 ton charge weight. In accordance with Olewskis formula

Grinding media wear away because of the attrition they are subjected to in the course of the grinding operation, and in addition a continuous reduction in weight takes place owing to corrosion. The rate of wear will in the first place depend on the abrasive properties of the mineral being ground and naturally also on the hardness of the grinding media themselves.

The wear of rods and balls is usually quoted in grammes per ton of material processed (dry weight) and normal values may lie between 100 and 1500 g/ton. Considerably higher wear figures may however be experienced in fine wet grinding of e.g. very hard siliceous sand.

A somewhat more accurate way of expressing wear is to state the amount of gross kWh of grinding power required to consume 1 kg of grinding media. A normal value in wet grinding is 15 kWh/kg.The wear figures in dry grinding are only 10-30 % of the above.

where c is a constant which, inter alia, takes into consideration the mean slope a of the charge, W is the weight in kp of the charge n is the RPM Rg is the distance in metres of the centre of gravity from the mill centre

W for rod and ball mills shall be taken as the weight of the rod or ball charge, i.e. the weight of the pulp is to be ignored. For pebble mills therefore W is to be calculated on the basis of the bulk weight of the pebbles.

It should be pointed out that factor c in the formula is a function of both the shape of the inner lining (lifter height etc.) and the RPM. The formula is however valid with sufficient accuracy for normal speeds and types of lining.

The diagram gives the values of the quantity Rg/d as a function of the charge volume, the assumption being that the charge has a plane surface and is homogeneous, d is the inside diameter of the mill in metres. The variation of the quantity a/d, where a is the distance between the surface of the charge and the mill centre, is also shown in the same figure.

In order to keep manufacturing costs at a minimum level, Morgardshammar has a series of standard mill diameters up to and including 6.5 m. Shell length, however, can be varied and tailor made for each application. The sizes selected are shown on the tables on page 12-13 and cover the power range of 200-5000 kW.

Shells with a diameter of up to about 4 m are made in one piece. Above this dimension, the shell is divided into a number of identical pieces, bolted together at site, in order to facilitate the transport. The shell is rolled and welded from steel plate and is fitted with welded flanges of the same material. The flanges are machined in order to provide them with locating surfaces fitting into the respective heads. The shells of ball and pebble mills are provided with 2 manholes with closely fitting covers. The shells have drilled holes for different types of linings.

Heads with a diameter of up to about 4 m are integral cast with the trunnion in one piece. Above this diameter the trunnion is made as a separate part bolted to the head. The head can then be divided in 2 or 4 pieces for easy transport and the pieces are bolted together at site. The material is cast steel or nodular iron. The heads and the trunnions have drilled holes for the lining.

Spherical roller (antifriction) bearings are normally used. They offer the most modern and reliable technology and have been used for many years. They are delivered with housings in a new design with ample labyrinth seals.

For very large trunnions or heavy mills, i.e. for primary autogenous grinding mills. Morgardshammar uses hydrostatic shoe bearings. They have many of the same advantages as roller bearings. They work with circulating oil under pressure.

The spherical roller bearing and the hydrostatic shoe bearing take a very limited axial space compared to a conventional sleeve bearing. This means that the lever of the bearing load is short. Furthermore, the bending moment on the head is small and as a result of this, the stress and deformation of the head are reduced. Ask Morgardshammar for special literature on trunnion bearings.

Ring gears are often supplied with spur gears. They are always split in 2 or 4 pieces in order to facilitate the assembly. Furthermore, they are symmetrical and can be turned round in order to make use of both tooth flanks. The material is cast steel or nodular iron. They are designed in accordance with AGMA.The ring gear may be mounted on either the feed or the discharge head. It is fitted with a welded plate guard.

The pinion and the counter shaft are integral forged and heat treated of high quality steel. For mill power exceeding about 2500 kW two pinions are used, one on each side of the mill (double-drive). The pinion is supported on two spherical roller bearings.

The trunnion bearings are lubricated by means of a small motor- driven grease lubricator. The gear ring is lubricated through a spray lubricating system, connected to the electric and pneumatic lines. The spray nozzles are mounted on a panel on the gear ring guard.

In order to protect the parts of the mill that come into contact with the material being ground, a replaceable lining of wear-resistant material is fitted. This may take the form of unalloyed or alloyed rolled or cast steel, heat treated if required, or rubber of the appropriate wear resistant quality. White cast iron, unalloyed or alloyed with nickel (Ni-hard), may also be used.

The shape of the mill lining is often of Lorain-type, consisting of plates held in place between lifter bars (or key bars) of suitable height bolted on to the shell. This system is used i.e. of all well-known manufacturers of rubber linings. Ball mills and autogenous mills with metal lining also can be provided with single or double waved plates without lifter bars.

In grate discharge mills the grate and the discharge lifters are a part of the lining. The grate plates with tapered slots or holes are of metal or rubber design. The discharge lifters are fabricated steel with thick rubber coating. Rubber layer for metal linings and heavy corner pieces of rubber are included in a Morgardshammar delivery as well as attaching bolts, washers, seal rings, and self-locking nuts. A Morgardshammar overflow mill can be converted into a grate discharge mill only by changing some liner parts and without any change of the mill. Trunnion liners are rubber coated fabricated steel or cast steel. In grate discharge mills the center cone and the trunnion liner form one piece.

Scoop feeders in combination with drum feeders are used when retaining oversize from a spiral or rake classifier. As hydrocyclones are used in most closed grinding circuits the spout feeders are used most frequently.

Vibrating feeders or screw feeders are used when charging feed to dry grinding mills. Trommel screens are used to protect slurry pumps and other transport equipment from tramp iron. Screens can have perforated rubber sheets or wire mesh. The trommel screens are bolted to the discharge trunnion lining.

Inching units for slow rotation of the mills are also furnished. Rods to the rod mills are charged by means of manual or automatic rod charges. Erection cradles on hydraulic jacks are used when erecting medium or big size mills at site.

A symbol of dependable quality ore milling machinery manufacturing, industrial and mining equipment, ball mills and rod mills as well as supplies created for your specific needs. During this period thousands of operators have experienced continuous economical and unequalled service through their use.As anindustrial ball mill manufacturer and supplier, we havecontinuously accumulated knowledge on grinding applications. It has contributed greatly to the grinding process through the development and improvement of such equipment.

Just what is grinding? It is the reduction of lump solid materials to smaller particles by the application of shearing forces, pressure, attrition, impact and abrasion. The primary consideration, then, has been to develop some mechanical means for applying these forces. The modern grinding mill applies power to rotate the mill shell and thus transmits energy to some form of media which, in turn, fractures individual particles.

Through constant and extensive research, in the field of grinding as well as in the field of manufacturing. Constantly changing conditions provide a challenge for the future. Meeting this challenge keeps our company young and progressive. This progressive spirit, with the knowledge gained through the years, assures top quality equipment for the users of our mills.

You are urged to study the following pages which present a detailed picture of our facilities and discuss the technical aspects of grinding. You will find this data helpful when considering the selection of the grinding equipment.

It is quite understandable that wetakes pride in the quality of our mills.Complementing the human craftsmanship built into these mills, our plants are equipped with modern machines of advanced design which permit accurate manufacturing of each constituent part. Competent supervision encourages close inspection of each mill both as to quality and proper fabrication. Each mill produced is assured of meeting the high required standards. New and higher speed machines have replaced former pieces of equipment to provide up-to-date procedures. The use of high speed cutting and drilling tools has stepped up production, thereby reducing costs and permitting us to add other refinements and pass these savings on to you, the consumer.

Each foundry heat is checked metallurgically prior to pouring. All first castings of any new design are carefully examined by the use of an X-ray machine to be certain of uniformity of structure. The X -ray is also used to check welding work, mill heads, and other castings.

Each Mills, regardless of size, is designed to meet the specific grinding conditions under which it will be used. The speed of the mill type of liner, discharge arrangement, size of feeder, size of bearings, mill diameter and length, and other factors are all considered to take care of the size of feed, tonnage, circulating sand load, selection of balls or rods, and the final size of grind.

All Mills are built with jigs and templates so that any part may be duplicated. A full set of detailed drawings is made for each mill and its parts. This record is kept up to date during the life of the mill. This assures accurate duplication for the replacement of wearing parts during the future years.

As a part of our service our staff includes experienced engineers, trained in the field of metallurgy with special emphasis on grinding work. This knowledge, as well as a background gained from intimate contact with various operating companies throughout the world, provides a sound basis for consultation on your grinding problems. We take pride in manufacturing rod mills and ball millsfor the metallurgical, rock products, cement, process, and chemical industries.

As an additional service we offer our testing laboratories to check your material for grindability. Since all grinding problems are different some basis must be established for recommending the size and type of grinding equipment required. Experience plays a great part in this phase however, to establish more direct relationships it is often essential to conduct individual grindability tests on the specific material involved. To do this we have established certain definite procedures of laboratory grinding work to correlate data obtained on any new specific material for comparison against certain standards. Such standards have been established from conducting similar work on material which is actually being ground in Mills throughout the world. The correlation between the results we obtain in our laboratory against these standards, coupled with the broad experience and our companys background, insures the proper selection and recommendation of the required grinding equipment.

When selecting a grinding mill there are many factors to be taken into consideration. First let us consider just what constitutes a grinding mill. Essentially it is a revolving, cylindrical shaded machine, the internal volume of which is approximately one-half filled with some form of grinding media such as steel balls, rods or non-ferrous pebbles.

Feed may be classified as hard, average or soft. It may be tough, brittle, spongy, or ductile. It may have a high specific gravity or a low specific gravity. The desired product from a mill may range in size from a 4 mesh down to 200 mesh, or into the fine micron sizes. For each of these properties a different mill would be indicated.

The Mill has been designed to carry out specific grinding work requirements with emphasis on economic factors. Consideration has been given to minimizing shut-down time and to provide long, dependable trouble-free operation. Wherever wear takes place renewable parts have been designed to provide maximum life. A Mill, given proper care, will last indefinitely.

Mills have been manufactured in a wide variety of sizes ranging from laboratory units to mills 12 in diameter, with any suitable length. Each of these mills, based on the principles of grinding, provides the most economical grinding apparatus.

For a number of years ball mill grinding was the only step in size reduction between crushing and subsequent treatment. Subsequently smaller rod mills have altered this situation, providing in some instances a more economical means of size reduction in the coarser fractions. The principal field of rod mill usage is the preparation of products in the 4-mesh to 35-mesh range. Under some conditions it may be recommended for grinding to about 48 mesh. Within these limits a rod mill is often superior to and more efficient than a ball mill. It is frequently used for such size reduction followed by ball milling to produce a finished fine grind. It makes a product uniform in size with only a minimum amount of tramp oversize.

The basic principle by which grinding is done is reduction by line contact between rods extending the full length of the mill. Such line contact results in selective grinding carried out on the largest particle sizes. As a result of this selective grinding work the inherent tendency is to make size reduction with the minimum production of extreme fines or slimes.

The small rod mill has been found advantageous for use as a fine crusher on damp or sticky materials. Under wet grinding conditions this feed characteristic has no drawback for rod milling whereas under crushing conditions those characteristics do cause difficulty. This asset is of particular importance in the manufacture of sand, brick, or lime where such material is ground and mixed with just sufficient water to dampen, but not to produce a pulp. The rod mill has been extensively used for the reduction of coke breeze in the 8-mesh to 20-mesh size range containing about 10% moisture to be used for sintering ores.

Grinding by use of nearly spherical shaped grinding media is termed ball milling. Strictly speaking, such media are made of steel or iron. When iron contamination is detrimental, porcelain or natural non-metallic materials are used and are referred to as pebbles. When ore particles are used as grinding media this is known as autogenous grinding.

Other shapes of media such as short cylinders, cubes, cones, or irregular shapes have been used for grinding work but today the nearly true spherical shape is predominant and has been found to provide the most economic form.

In contrast to rod milling the grinding action results from point contact rather than line contact. Such point contacts take place between the balls and the shell liners, and between the individual balls themselves. The material at those points of contact is ground to extremely fine sizes. The present day practice in ball milling is generally to reduce material to 35 mesh or finer. Grinding in a ball mill is not selective as it is in a rod mill and as a result more extreme fines and tramp oversize are produced.

Small Ball mills are generally recommended not only for single stage fine grinding but also have wide application in regrind work. The Small Ball millwith its low pulp level is especially adapted to single stage grinding as evidenced by hundreds of installations throughout the world. There are many applications in specialized industrial work for either continuous or batch grinding.

Wet grinding may be considered as the grinding of material in the presence of water or other liquids in sufficient quantity to produce a fluid pulp (generally 60% to 80% solids). Dry grinding on the other hand is carried out where moisture is restricted to a very limited amount (generally less than 5%). Most materials may be ground by use of either method in either ball mills or rod mills. Selection is determined by the condition of feed to the mill and the requirements of the ground product for subsequent treatment. When grinding dry some provision must be made to permit material to flow through the mill. Mills provide this necessary gradient from the point of feeding to point of discharge and thereby expedites flow.

The fineness to which material must be ground is determined by the individual material and the subsequent treatment of that ground material Where actual physical separation of constituent particles is to be realized grinding must be carried to the fineness where the individual components are separated. Some materials are liberated in coarse sizes whereas others are not liberated until extremely fine sizes are reached.

Occasionally a sufficient amount of valuable particles are liberated in coarser sizes to justify separate treatment at that grind. This treatment is usually followed by regrinding for further liberation. Where chemical treatment is involved, the reaction between a solid and a liquid, or a solid and a gas, will generally proceed more rapidly as the particle sizes are reduced. The point of most rapid and economical change would determine the fineness of grind required.

Laboratory examinations and grinding tests on specific materials should be conducted to determine not only the fineness of grind required, but also to indicate the size of commercial equipment to handle any specific problem.

the 8 best spice grinders of 2021

the 8 best spice grinders of 2021

Whether you're looking to blend up your favorite whole spices, or wish to create a custom marinade, spice grinders are a fun and easy tool that will take your dishes to the next level. A cousin to the trusty food processor, choose any spice of your choosing, from whole spice leaves to coffee beans, and watch it transform into a ground spice blend before your eyes.

The options for this handy tool are endless, and you can choose how finely you wish to grind your favorite spices. From electric grinders to manual models, we've researched the best spice grinders for your needs.

There are several great spice grinders out there, but the Secura Electric Coffee and Spice Grinder earned the best overall spot for a few reasons. One of the biggest is that it has two separate milling bowls, one thats designed for chopping and the other thats made for grinding.

Aside from the fact that having two bowls helps prevent melding of flavors while grinding, the different blade systems ensure that youre getting the right grind for whatever spice or ingredient youre using. The bowls also have measurement markings on the inside so you can easily add what you need without using separate measuring spoons (unless you want to).

The Secura also brings power in a compact, counter-friendly size. The 200-watt motor can easily handle most spices as well as larger items like nuts or coffee beans, while the built-in overheat protection extends its lifespan so you can keep it around for a while.

If you need a spice grinder that can handle larger quantities of spices for batch cooking or meal prepping, the Cuisinart Spice and Nut Grinder is one of the largest and most powerful options out there. It has a 90 gram (or just over 3 ounce) bowl size and a 200-watt motor that was designed to tackle bigger spice-grinding jobs.

Probably unsurprisingly, KitchenAid, one of the leaders in kitchen gadgets, earned the spot of best multipurpose spice grinder with its dual coffee and spice grinder. Unlike other grinders, which require thorough cleaning between different spicesor when you switch from coffee grinding to spice grindingthe KitchenAid comes with three separate stainless steel grinding bowls.

These bowls allow you to quickly grind three different spices at a time without the transfer of flavor that inevitability happens when youre using the same bowl for the entire job. There are also two storage lids, so if you grind more than you need, you can pop a lid on two of the bowls and save it in your pantry for later.

Although there arent any programmed settings that allow you to control grind size, the grinder comes with a clear lid that allows you to see what youre doing so you can stop grinding when your spices reach the desired fineness.

Unlike other grinders, which can be obnoxiously loud, the Krups Silent Vortex Electric Grinder was designed with quiet in mind. If youre an early morning cook or you need something that gets the job done during a childs afternoon nap, the Krups is probably the best choice for you.

It comes equipped with patent-pending Vortex Spin Technology that helps pull ingredients into its blades for grinding thats as quiet as it is efficient. It has a one-touch push button that you can hold down for continuous grinding or tap to pulse grind.

The stainless steel grinding bowl is removable and comes with a storage lid, so if you need to store spices, you can pop the lid on and put it right into your pantry. However, unlike the KitchenAid, the Krups only comes with one grinding bowl, so you wont be able to grind new spices while youre storing any.

The Shardor Coffee and Spice Grinder was expertly designed to be the perfect cooking multi-tasking tool. It comes with two stainless steel bowls. The first is a two-blade grinder bowl that handles dry items, like spices and coffee beans. The other is a four-blade chopper bowl that can wet-grind garlic and herbs like basil, eliminating the need for manual mincing as you cook.

This also makes the Shardor an excellent choice for anyone with problems with manual dexterity, especially since, instead of pressing down on an on/off button, you can activate the motor by pushing down on the entire lid instead.

If youre looking for a budget-friendly way to freshly grind spices, the Brentwood Coffee and Spice Grinder gets the job done at a great price. While most electric spice grinders cost around $40 to $50, you can get the Brentwood grinder for under $20.

The 150-watt motor is slightly less powerful than some of the others on this list, but it easily can give you a medium-fine to coarse grind. It may have a little trouble pulling off a super fine grind, but thats generally not necessary for most cooking needs anyway.

If you dont need the power of an electric grinder, but you still want an easy and effective way to add some freshly ground spices to your dishes, the Kuhn Rikon Ratchet Grinder is one of the most user-friendly manual spice grinders on the market.

It has a door on the front of its body that you can open and use to easily fill the spice chamber with one dried spice or a combination to create your own spice blend. Unlike other manual spice grinders that require you to turn the handle in a full circle, the Kuhn has an ergonomic ratchet handle that you toggle back and forth to grind.

And its made of ceramic stone so, even after frequent use, it wont break down and corrode. Out of all the best spice grinders on the list, the Kuhn may also be the easiest option to clean. Instead of washing or putting it through the dishwasher, all you have to do is add some coarse salt to the chamber and grind it to clean the blades.

If you need a spice grinder mainly for salt and pepper, the Epare Dual Manual Mill can handle both at the same time. Its dual design combines two separate chambers in a sleek space-saving device that has separate milling blades on each end. Dials on the end of each blade cap allow you to independently control the fineness and coarseness of each spice.

And even though the design is sleek, each chamber, which can handle even the toughest spices like rock salt and whole peppercorns, is large enough to fit a full cup of spices. The chambers are also clear, so you can easily see when youre running low and need to refill.

If you need a spice grinder that can do it all, the Secura Electric Coffee and Spice Grinder has two grinding bowls that can manage all of your kitchen tasks. If you need a bulk-grinding option, you might want to go with the Cuisinart Spice and Nut Grinder, which has a larger capacity, instead.

Lindsay Boyers is a certified holistic nutritionist with extensive nutrition knowledge and cooking experience. Shes developed over 1,000 original recipes and is constantly on a mission to find the best kitchen gadgets, at the best prices, to help make life in the kitchen more streamlined and efficient.

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