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high frequency screen x linux

high frequency buzz (sound) with mostly white screen - ars technica openforum

high frequency buzz (sound) with mostly white screen - ars technica openforum

Does anyone know the cause(s) of a high frequency sound that occurs on monitors for certain screens (this seems mostly when white but not always)? It seems to happen on both my new Samsung 900IFT and an old CTX 17" and with different vid cards. It seems to be helped by turning the contrast down (and hence monitor related), but then it doesn't seem to be set up right to me anyway.Related, what's the best procedure for adjusting a monitor, I never seem to have much luck with it?dlr(2)

The high-frequency sound is caused by inverse microphonics in the flyback transformer. The plates that make up the core of the FT are slightly moving and rubbing against one another, causing the sound. It's greatest when there's lots of white on the screen because that's when the amplitude of the signal applied to the FT is greatest, which causes more movement and hence more sound. Switch to a higher resolution and the sound will probably increase in pitch, possibly to ultrasonic. The only other way to get rid of it is to stick flat toothpicks between the plates of the transformer core, something that ordinary mortals should probably not attempt. View image: /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

White (and also red) commonly cause this effect. When a monitor isn't properly shielded, and that monitor approaches 100 IRE (think of that as brightness), that high video signal "leaks out" and into the audio, where it manifests itself as a whine or a buzz depending on the frequency (the color being shown) and the amount of leakage (how bright the screen is, and thus how much leakage occurrs).Happens alot in television, especially in live shots via satellite. Guy gets in front of the camera wearing a white or red shirt/jacket/whatever and there's a buzz.

Sounds like there is nothing to try except switching to a higher res (already at 85hz), me being a mere mortal and all View image: /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif . Thanks for the great answers, as is always the case at Ars (sorry feeling a bit of attachment given the financial troubles going on now).dlr(2)

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introduction to linsmith

introduction to linsmith

linSmith is a Smith Charting program, mainly designed for educational use. As such, there is an emphasis on capabilities that improve the 'showing the effect of'-style of operation. Postscript output It's main features are: Definition of multiple load impedances (at different frequencies) Addition of discrete (L, C, parallel and series LC, and transformer) and line components (open and closed stubs, line segments) Connection in series and parallel Easy experimentation with values using scrollbars A 'virtual' component switches from impedance to admittance to help explaining (or understanding) parallel components The chart works in real impedances (not normalized ones) Direct view of the result on the screen Ability to generate publication quality Postscript output A 'log' file with textual results at each intermediate step Load and circuit configuration is stored separately, permitting several solutions without re-defining the other (this may actually change to single files - I'm not quite convinced here) Some distributions have made packages available for easier installation. Be aware that they may be outdated. In that case, consider compiling compiling your own, it's not really that difficult! Thanks This program was written with the help of the GIMP toolkit (GTK+), a marvelous piece of work, and uses the gnome-print library to generate Postscript output. Of course, it was developed on Linux, using the gcc compiler suite and the Glade GUI development system. Graphics items were designed using the GIMP itself. I'd like to thank Georg Baum for convincing me to publish the program, and for his help with the packaging. Also thanks to Once (WanShi) Shuiqing for reporting bugs and translating into Chinese (see image). Chinese translation A reference to linSmith appeared in an article in High Frequency Electronics of Jan/2009 by Anthony Bichler. Thanks! Thanks to SourceForge for the downloading and management services. A note about Tucows I've had some remarks about the fact that the Tucows listing is not updated regularly, and is always lagging behind. A non-paying free software entry at Tucows normally takes 40 - 60 days to get to the top of the waiting list - more if some mistake is made at the presentation. Of course, as I don't get paid for the software, I cannot afford to pay for 'preferencial' treatment. (Note: Updating Tucows now takes around 200 (!) days. I've given given up...) This is also the reason for the fact that linSmith is not rated. The rating has to be paid for... Local copies Archivo Tamao Contenido linsmith-0.99.30.tar.gz 1.1 MB Last published version linsmith-0.99.31.tar.gz 1.1 MB Development Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

Postscript output It's main features are: Definition of multiple load impedances (at different frequencies) Addition of discrete (L, C, parallel and series LC, and transformer) and line components (open and closed stubs, line segments) Connection in series and parallel Easy experimentation with values using scrollbars A 'virtual' component switches from impedance to admittance to help explaining (or understanding) parallel components The chart works in real impedances (not normalized ones) Direct view of the result on the screen Ability to generate publication quality Postscript output A 'log' file with textual results at each intermediate step Load and circuit configuration is stored separately, permitting several solutions without re-defining the other (this may actually change to single files - I'm not quite convinced here) Some distributions have made packages available for easier installation. Be aware that they may be outdated. In that case, consider compiling compiling your own, it's not really that difficult! Thanks This program was written with the help of the GIMP toolkit (GTK+), a marvelous piece of work, and uses the gnome-print library to generate Postscript output. Of course, it was developed on Linux, using the gcc compiler suite and the Glade GUI development system. Graphics items were designed using the GIMP itself. I'd like to thank Georg Baum for convincing me to publish the program, and for his help with the packaging. Also thanks to Once (WanShi) Shuiqing for reporting bugs and translating into Chinese (see image). Chinese translation A reference to linSmith appeared in an article in High Frequency Electronics of Jan/2009 by Anthony Bichler. Thanks! Thanks to SourceForge for the downloading and management services. A note about Tucows I've had some remarks about the fact that the Tucows listing is not updated regularly, and is always lagging behind. A non-paying free software entry at Tucows normally takes 40 - 60 days to get to the top of the waiting list - more if some mistake is made at the presentation. Of course, as I don't get paid for the software, I cannot afford to pay for 'preferencial' treatment. (Note: Updating Tucows now takes around 200 (!) days. I've given given up...) This is also the reason for the fact that linSmith is not rated. The rating has to be paid for... Local copies Archivo Tamao Contenido linsmith-0.99.30.tar.gz 1.1 MB Last published version linsmith-0.99.31.tar.gz 1.1 MB Development Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

Definition of multiple load impedances (at different frequencies) Addition of discrete (L, C, parallel and series LC, and transformer) and line components (open and closed stubs, line segments) Connection in series and parallel Easy experimentation with values using scrollbars A 'virtual' component switches from impedance to admittance to help explaining (or understanding) parallel components The chart works in real impedances (not normalized ones) Direct view of the result on the screen Ability to generate publication quality Postscript output A 'log' file with textual results at each intermediate step Load and circuit configuration is stored separately, permitting several solutions without re-defining the other (this may actually change to single files - I'm not quite convinced here) Some distributions have made packages available for easier installation. Be aware that they may be outdated. In that case, consider compiling compiling your own, it's not really that difficult!

Some distributions have made packages available for easier installation. Be aware that they may be outdated. In that case, consider compiling compiling your own, it's not really that difficult!

Thanks This program was written with the help of the GIMP toolkit (GTK+), a marvelous piece of work, and uses the gnome-print library to generate Postscript output. Of course, it was developed on Linux, using the gcc compiler suite and the Glade GUI development system. Graphics items were designed using the GIMP itself. I'd like to thank Georg Baum for convincing me to publish the program, and for his help with the packaging. Also thanks to Once (WanShi) Shuiqing for reporting bugs and translating into Chinese (see image). Chinese translation A reference to linSmith appeared in an article in High Frequency Electronics of Jan/2009 by Anthony Bichler. Thanks! Thanks to SourceForge for the downloading and management services. A note about Tucows I've had some remarks about the fact that the Tucows listing is not updated regularly, and is always lagging behind. A non-paying free software entry at Tucows normally takes 40 - 60 days to get to the top of the waiting list - more if some mistake is made at the presentation. Of course, as I don't get paid for the software, I cannot afford to pay for 'preferencial' treatment. (Note: Updating Tucows now takes around 200 (!) days. I've given given up...) This is also the reason for the fact that linSmith is not rated. The rating has to be paid for... Local copies Archivo Tamao Contenido linsmith-0.99.30.tar.gz 1.1 MB Last published version linsmith-0.99.31.tar.gz 1.1 MB Development Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

This program was written with the help of the GIMP toolkit (GTK+), a marvelous piece of work, and uses the gnome-print library to generate Postscript output. Of course, it was developed on Linux, using the gcc compiler suite and the Glade GUI development system. Graphics items were designed using the GIMP itself. I'd like to thank Georg Baum for convincing me to publish the program, and for his help with the packaging. Also thanks to Once (WanShi) Shuiqing for reporting bugs and translating into Chinese (see image). Chinese translation A reference to linSmith appeared in an article in High Frequency Electronics of Jan/2009 by Anthony Bichler. Thanks! Thanks to SourceForge for the downloading and management services. A note about Tucows I've had some remarks about the fact that the Tucows listing is not updated regularly, and is always lagging behind. A non-paying free software entry at Tucows normally takes 40 - 60 days to get to the top of the waiting list - more if some mistake is made at the presentation. Of course, as I don't get paid for the software, I cannot afford to pay for 'preferencial' treatment. (Note: Updating Tucows now takes around 200 (!) days. I've given given up...) This is also the reason for the fact that linSmith is not rated. The rating has to be paid for... Local copies Archivo Tamao Contenido linsmith-0.99.30.tar.gz 1.1 MB Last published version linsmith-0.99.31.tar.gz 1.1 MB Development Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

I'd like to thank Georg Baum for convincing me to publish the program, and for his help with the packaging. Also thanks to Once (WanShi) Shuiqing for reporting bugs and translating into Chinese (see image).

Thanks to SourceForge for the downloading and management services. A note about Tucows I've had some remarks about the fact that the Tucows listing is not updated regularly, and is always lagging behind. A non-paying free software entry at Tucows normally takes 40 - 60 days to get to the top of the waiting list - more if some mistake is made at the presentation. Of course, as I don't get paid for the software, I cannot afford to pay for 'preferencial' treatment. (Note: Updating Tucows now takes around 200 (!) days. I've given given up...) This is also the reason for the fact that linSmith is not rated. The rating has to be paid for... Local copies Archivo Tamao Contenido linsmith-0.99.30.tar.gz 1.1 MB Last published version linsmith-0.99.31.tar.gz 1.1 MB Development Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

A note about Tucows I've had some remarks about the fact that the Tucows listing is not updated regularly, and is always lagging behind. A non-paying free software entry at Tucows normally takes 40 - 60 days to get to the top of the waiting list - more if some mistake is made at the presentation. Of course, as I don't get paid for the software, I cannot afford to pay for 'preferencial' treatment. (Note: Updating Tucows now takes around 200 (!) days. I've given given up...) This is also the reason for the fact that linSmith is not rated. The rating has to be paid for... Local copies Archivo Tamao Contenido linsmith-0.99.30.tar.gz 1.1 MB Last published version linsmith-0.99.31.tar.gz 1.1 MB Development Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

I've had some remarks about the fact that the Tucows listing is not updated regularly, and is always lagging behind. A non-paying free software entry at Tucows normally takes 40 - 60 days to get to the top of the waiting list - more if some mistake is made at the presentation. Of course, as I don't get paid for the software, I cannot afford to pay for 'preferencial' treatment. (Note: Updating Tucows now takes around 200 (!) days. I've given given up...) This is also the reason for the fact that linSmith is not rated. The rating has to be paid for... Local copies Archivo Tamao Contenido linsmith-0.99.30.tar.gz 1.1 MB Last published version linsmith-0.99.31.tar.gz 1.1 MB Development Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

A non-paying free software entry at Tucows normally takes 40 - 60 days to get to the top of the waiting list - more if some mistake is made at the presentation. Of course, as I don't get paid for the software, I cannot afford to pay for 'preferencial' treatment. (Note: Updating Tucows now takes around 200 (!) days. I've given given up...) This is also the reason for the fact that linSmith is not rated. The rating has to be paid for... Local copies Archivo Tamao Contenido linsmith-0.99.30.tar.gz 1.1 MB Last published version linsmith-0.99.31.tar.gz 1.1 MB Development Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

This is also the reason for the fact that linSmith is not rated. The rating has to be paid for... Local copies Archivo Tamao Contenido linsmith-0.99.30.tar.gz 1.1 MB Last published version linsmith-0.99.31.tar.gz 1.1 MB Development Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

Local copies Archivo Tamao Contenido linsmith-0.99.30.tar.gz 1.1 MB Last published version linsmith-0.99.31.tar.gz 1.1 MB Development Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

Wish list Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

Things I'd like to add: Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

Arrows to the connecting lines and arcs Labels to the impedances Input of impedances as S-parameters (maybe Y-parameters too) Optional lines through points indicating wavelengths Export the numeric impedance list to a text file (csv?) Export of a screen shot of the map (but not just the visible part) to an image file Make the points moveable by dragging them on the chart (the handler is already in place) Some kind of auto-optimization? Automatically generate a legend of the colors used. 123392 (c) John Coppens ON6JC/LW3HAZ mail

will a low pixel response time (1-8ms) high frequency (120-144hz) ips laptop screen have the same low pixel response time run at 60hz as well? - displays - linus tech tips

will a low pixel response time (1-8ms) high frequency (120-144hz) ips laptop screen have the same low pixel response time run at 60hz as well? - displays - linus tech tips

I want to replace my slow very high pixel response time IPS laptop screen because motion blur is unbearable. I am not sure my GPUs support the high frequencies (120-144Hz), so I may need to run it at 60Hz. I want to make sure the low pixel response time is also present at 60Hz.

Not always. And, a lot of times it's only achievable when using the highest overdrive setting which can cause serious overshoot. You should try to find reviews from trusted sources to know for sure.

CPU:AMD Ryzen 9 5900X Cooler:Noctua NH-U12S chromax.black Motherboard:MSI MEG X570 Unify RAM:G.skill Ripjaws V 2x16GB 3600MHz CL16 Graphics Card:ASUSGeForce RTX 3060 Ti TUF Gaming Boot Drive:500GB WD Black SN750 M.2 NVMe SSD Game Drive:2TB Crucial MX500 SATA SSD PSU:EVGA SuperNova 650 G+ 650W 80+ Gold Case:Fractal Design Meshify C Monitor:MSI Optix MAG342CQR 34 UWQHD 3440x1440 144Hz

Also remember, a Display will always run at the set refresh rate indicated under your display settings unless variable refresh is enabled. So u can play at 60fps while refreshing at 120hz for example, with Vsync enabled to remove tearing.

If however u enable Gsync or FreeSync and run at 60fps, THEN your display with refresh at the given Frame rate. When this happens ull likely end up slowing down the pixel response. Should this be the case, u can tune any overdrive settings available to that frequency to overcome said slower pixel response.

However once u exit the specific game ur playing, and play a different game with higher FPS, that overdrive setting will likely be to high resulting in overshoot or possibly to low resulting in a slower pixel response that would could be achieved with a higher overdrive setting.

cputool - limit and control cpu utilization of any process in linux

cputool - limit and control cpu utilization of any process in linux

One of the critical areas under Linux performance monitoring has to be CPU usage and system load. There are several Linux performance monitoring tools to keep an eye on how things are unfolding on a system.

CPUTool is a simple yet powerful command-line tool for limiting and controlling CPU utilization of any process to a given limit and allows the interruption of process execution if the system load overreach a defined threshold.

In order to limit CPU usage, cputool sends the SIGSTOP and SIGCONT signals to processes and this is determined by the system load. It relies on the /proc pseudo-filesystem to read PIDs and their CPU usage measures.

The --cpu-limit or -c flag is used to set a usage percentage for a process or group of processes and -p to specify a PID. The following command will limit the dd command (PID 8275) to 50% use of one CPU core:

TecMint is the fastest growing and most trusted community site for any kind of Linux Articles, Guides and Books on the web. Millions of people visit TecMint! to search or browse the thousands of published articles available FREELY to all.

The cputool is probably fine for some processes, but not for all of them. The 'dd' command is stopped when operated with cputool and this can be seen if the dd command is being run in the background and then issued a jobs command.

Good concern, we stated it as a range because after limiting CPU usage to a given percentage, the value will not just remain exactly at what you have set. It keeps on changing but remains either slightly lower or higher that the set value.

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