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pondicherrin cone crusher cost

crushing - metso outotec

crushing - metso outotec

We know that the only real measure of our worth is in the results we deliver to our customers. 100+ years of experience in delivering high-capacity crushing solutions for the mining industry ensure that we provide world-class crushing equipment, crusher parts, maintenance and optimization services.

From large primary jaws and gyratories to cone and impact crushers for tertiary and quaternary finishing, Metso Outotec equipment is manufactured to meet your material reduction requirements. The crushers are built to perform with the lowest cost per ton, featuring a unique combination of crusher cavity design, crushing forces,reliability and safety.

Engineered spare and wear parts as well as maintenance and optimization services are designed with decades of experience in different crushers and crushing processes. The parts are durable and easy to maintain, maintenance is quickly available, and the optimization services help in getting most out of new or used equipment or the entire crushing process.

Metso Outotec is combining our legacy and expertise to introduce the Mining Crushing Stations. These 2 modular crushing and screening plants are unique, cost-efficient and productive and designed to provide significant time and resource savings.

FIT Stations are focused on speed and flexibility for quick installations. The Foresight Stations are focused on smart controls and automation for optimal productivity. Both stations come with proven Metso Outotec equipment and technology to deliver maximum productivity for even the most demanding mining applications.

cone crushers - for demanding crushing needs - metso outotec

cone crushers - for demanding crushing needs - metso outotec

Cone crushers are very suitable for size reduction and shaping in the downstream of a crushing circuit. They reduce the material in a crushing cavity by continuous compression between a fixed element (bowl liner) and a moving element (mantle).

Our cone crusher offering consists of four different product families that utilize the same crushing principle but vary in features and optimal applications. In addition to stationary crushers, many cone crusher models are also available as mobile andportable versions.

Engineered for all rock types, Nordberg GP Series cone crushers can be utilized as secondary, tertiary, and quaternary crushers in aggregates production plants and in mining operations. Nordberg GP Series cone crushers are all-round crushing machines enabling smooth crushing process adaptation and full automation.

Nordberg HP Series cone crushers are well performing and reliable rock crushing machines for all aggregates production, quarrying and mining applications. They are normally utilized in secondary, tertiary and quaternary crushing stages.

Nordberg MP Series cone crushers have a high capacity and the highest crushing force of any cone crusher of similar size. Thanks to their crushing force, Nordberg MP Series cone crushers are widely used in the secondary and tertiary crushing stages in mining operations that process very large amounts of material.

Metso MX Series cone crushers are the latest addition to the cone crushers portfolio. MX Series cone crushers utilize a revolutionary technology that combines a rotating bowl with piston into one crusher.

Known for lower operating costs, high uptime and consistent high-quality output, Metso MX Series cone crushers are ideal for secondary, tertiary and quaternary stages in hard and soft rock applications.

cone crushers | mclanahan

cone crushers | mclanahan

A Cone Crusher is a compression type of machine that reduces material by squeezing or compressing the feed material between a moving piece of steel and a stationary piece of steel. Final sizing and reduction is determined by the closed side setting or the gap between the two crushing members at the lowest point. As the wedge or eccentric rotates to cause the compression within the chamber, the material gets smaller as it moves down through the wear liner as the opening in the cavity gets tighter. The crushed material is discharged at the bottom of the machine after they pass through the cavity.

A Cone Crusher will deliver a 4:1 to 6:1 reduction ratio. As we set the closed side setting tighter to create a finer output, we also reduce the volume or throughput capacity of the machine. Generally speaking, multiplying the closed side setting by two is a good guide to the top size of the gradation exiting the machine.

The technology that makes a MSP Cone Crusher outperform competitive cones on the market is the combination of all of the factors of performance i.e. balanced eccentric, higher speeds, fulcrum point position, and stroke. By using sound engineering with years of field testing a truly tried and tested new Cone Crusher has emerged.

A balanced eccentric coupled with a fulcrum point ideally placed over the crushing chamber yields highly effective compression crushing. This allows higher eccentric speeds to maximize performance without disruptive forces. The eccentric stroke is designed to work with the eccentric speed and fulcrum position to produce higher yields and minimize recirculating loads. The torque and resultant crushing forces are as effective as virtually any Cone Crusher on the market.

Spiral bevel gears provide the turning force to the eccentric. The spiral gear is mounted on a sturdy countershaft of the Cone Crusher, which rides in bronze bushings. The gears are precision cut for quiet operation. Misalignment problems are eliminated.

The MSP Cone Crusher features one of the largest volume displacements by a crusher head. When there is a large volume of material displaced this way, it means that more material is crushed in each cycle, more material can be fed to fill the larger void left when the crushing head recedes, and more material flows through the crusher due to the larger throughput and gyrating cycles allowing material to drop further. The benefits of high efficiency, greater crushing force and high capacity coupled with the durability the market expects are the reasons why this design is the best way to increase your productivity and profitability.

Sleeve bearings make removal and installation of the MSP Cone Crusher head and main shaft simple. The tapered main shaft fits into a large opening at the upper end of the tapered eccentric bushing. The shaft does not require precise alignment. It can be inserted from a vertical position and will self-align.

With the MSP Cone Crushers automatic hydraulic overload relief system, the crusher immediately opens in the event of an overload. This action reduces the crushing pressure, allowing the obstruction to pass through the chamber. After the chamber has been cleared, the hydraulic control system automatically returns the crusher to its original setting. Shock loads on the crusher are reduced for longer component life.

MSP Cone Crushers are built to make your operations run more smoothly and easily. Its simple and easy to read control panel provides you with the necessary information to properly run your crusher. For example, the MSP Cone Crusher shows you the exact cone setting to allow the operator to stay on top of a critical set point.

To enhance your Cone Crusher's life and maintain optimal crushing capacities, an automatic liner change reminder is included for your convenience. When the new mantle and liners are installed, the automated reminder is reset. As the crusher operates, the system will track production capacities and calculate the liner wear rate. When the cone liners reach the maximum wear point, it sends a flashing reminder to 'change cone' on the cone setting meter. After the wear parts are changed, simply reset the automated reminder system and continue efficient, reliable crushing.

The MSP Cone Crushers are built heavier than most competitive Cone Crushers. The extra weight means lower stress on the machine, which results in longer operational life. There is no question that the proper use of mass makes for more durable crushers. Additionally, a broad array of manganese liners is offered for each size MSP Cone. A unique and patented feature allows the Liners to fit without the use of any backing material. Improved Chamber matching with crusher feeds virtually eliminates any trial and error.

All these factors combine to give producers more effective compression crushing. This reduces liner wear, which reduces wear cost and allows higher yields, resulting in decreased overall cost per ton of finished product.

In the Symons principle, which is utilized by the MSP Cone Crusher, each cycle is timed so that the feed material and the upward thrust of the crushing head meet at the moment of maximum impact. The optimum speed of gyration and the large eccentric throw produce two important results: 1) the rapidly closing head catches the falling feed material and delivers the extremely high crushing force and 2) on the other side of the chamber the rapidly receding head allows material to fall freely to the next point of impact or exit the chamber. The combination of superior crushing force and free flow of material in the MSP Cone Crusher results in production levels that are unsurpassed and means lower power consumption per ton.

Ten years of testing went into the final combination of speed, stroke, and head angle to deliver the most efficient use of power. Greater efficiency delivers lower power consumption, reduced cost per ton, less maintenance and higher profits.

The power input imparted by the driven eccentric results in a bearing force in opposition to the crushing force at a point on the lower portion of the main shaft. The bearing force as it is transmitted to the main shaft provides the required moment to crush the rock. The distance between the bearing force and the fulcrum point is called the force arm. The longer the force arm, the greater the momentum, which produces a greater crushing force.

Crushing loads are distributed over a large spherical bearing. The socket liner keeps full contact with the crushing head ball and carries all of the vertical component and part of the horizontal. The long force arm, represented by the main shaft, reduces the load transmitted through the eccentric bushing.

Capacities and product gradations produced by Cone Crushers are affected by the method of feeding, characteristics of the material fed, speed of the machine, power applied, and other factors. Hardness, compressive strength, mineral content, grain structure, plasticity, size and shape of feed particles, moisture content, and other characteristics of the material also affect production capacities and gradations. Gradations and capacities are most often based on a typical, well-graded choke feed to the crusher. Well-graded feed is considered to be 90% to 100% passing the closed side feed opening, 40% to 60% passing the midpoint of the crushing chamber on the closed side (average of the closed side feed opening and closed side setting), and 0 to 10% passing the closed side setting. Choke feed is considered to be material located 360 degrees around the crushing head and approximately 6 above the mantle nut. Maximum feed size is the average of the open side feed opening and closed side feed opening.

Minimum closed side setting may vary depending on crushing conditions, the compressive strength of the material being crushed, and stage of reduction. The actual minimum closed side setting is that setting just before the bowl assembly lifts minutely against the factory recommended pressurized hydraulicrelief system.

Overall, industry acceptance of the Symons principle and performance, the McLanahan Cone Crusher works to deliver lower recirculating loads at higher tonnage rates with lower maintenance costs by combining:

A general rule of thumb for applying Cone Crushers is the reduction ratio. A crusher with coarse style liners would typically have a 6:1 reduction ratio. Thus, with a 34 closed side setting, the maximum feed would be 6 x 34 or 4.5 inches. Reduction ratios of 8:1 may be possible in certain coarse crushing applications. Fine liner configurations typically have reduction ratios of 4:1 to 6:1.

The difference between the volume displaced by the crushing head when it is fully closed and fully open is called the displacement volume. A large displacement volume results in greater capacity because:

In order to maintain the maximum levels of capacity, gradation, and cubical product, a Cone Crusher must be choke-fed at all times. The best way to keep a choke-feed to the ConeCrusher is with a surge bin (or hopper) and feeder that are located prior to the crusher. Choke-feeding is almost impossible to achieve without a hopper and feeder.

There are a number of different criteria to consider when selecting the right chambers for your crushing needs. However, the one that must always be considered isthat you have a well-graded feed to the chamber. A well-graded feed is generally thought to be 90 to 100% passing the closed-side feed opening, 40 to 60% passing the midpoint, and 0 to 10% passing the closed-side setting.

One thing you should never do is place a new concave liner in a crusher with a worn mantleor place a new mantle in a crusher with a concave liner. Why? If you have properly selected the replacement component, you will change the complete profile of the Cone Crusher by mating new and worn components. The receiving opening will tend to close down, restricting the feed from entering the chamber and causing a reduction in tons per hour.

If the liner is wearing evenly throughout the chamber, you should consider changing out the manganese when it has worn down to about 1" (2.5 cm) thick at the bottom. At about 3/4" to 5/8" (1.9 to 1.6 cm) thick, the manganese will crack, causing the backing material to begin to disintegrate. This, in turn, will cause the liners to break loose. If this should happen, continued operation could destroy the seat on the support bowl or the head of the Cone Crusher.

McLanahan Symons Principle (MSP) Cone Crushers utilize a combination of improved factors of performance, which are enhanced by the Symons Principle of crushing, as well as the latest hydraulic features and electrical features that create a modern, efficient, reliable and durable Cone Crusher that ultimately leads to a faster ROI. MSP Cone Crushers are designed to make your operation run more smoothly and easily, as well as ensuring lower operating costs and minimal downtime so that MSP Cone Crushers are more frequently fully operational and processing optimal amounts of material.

Efficiency can be defined by the ratio of the work done by a machine to the energy supplied to it. To apply what this means to your crusher, in your reduction process you are producing exactly the sizes your market is demanding. In the past, quarries produced a range of single-size aggregate products up to 40 mm in size. However, the trend for highly specified aggregate has meant that products have become increasingly finer. Currently, many quarries do not produce significant quantities of aggregate coarser than 20 mm; it is not unusual for material coarser than 10 mm to be stockpiled for further crushing.

crushing equipment purchase price means less than you think

crushing equipment purchase price means less than you think

If purchase price was the determining factor in profitability, why does a difference in price exist? Wouldnt the operations that spent the least amount of money on equipment, parts and service own the market? One look around tells you that this isnt the case.If you dig deeper, its the operators who understand the two drivers of crushing profitability that are the most successful. Those drivers are:

Assume: 250 tons per hour production Crushing price of $2.50 per ton 3 crew members on shift, average hourly wage $20 per hour 60 hours per week operation Crushing season 26 weeks or 130 Days Approximately 6-7 months of operation Annual production tonnage of 390,000 ton

You're spending money whether your equipment is crushing or not - your crew is still there, fixing equipment instead of managing quarry production. If they're waiting or working on a piece of broken equipment, they are still getting paid.

While youre spending this money, you arent getting paid. To add insult to injury, you may now have to pay overtime after the breakdown to get back on track and you may even face penalties if youre late.

Based on a 12 hour production day, this translates to a daily cost of downtime of $8,220 if you have no downstream processes the crusher feeds. Do you get better production? Different sell price for your gravel? Plug in your numbers and see what your cost of downtime is.

ProductivityAs we saw in the cost of downtime, the impact of productivity improvements are significant. Lets say you are losing 10% of your potential production due to blinding screens or worn down manganese. Here is the math.

This means that for every day that an operation is not running at peak production it loses out on $750 revenue. Putting off maintenance or not sure if you can afford a screen cloth upgrade? The cost of this spread running at just 10% less production for one week is $3,750.

At $2.50 per ton it takes 2,320 tons per month. In our earlier scenario, to pay for that extra $300,000 for the crusher takes 9.7 tons per hour! This is a very achievable gain. In fact, getting an additional 25 tons per hour is easily attinable when you include liner performance and crushing chamber automation.

Over 15 years if a cone plant delivered an extra 9.7 tons per hour of production would produce an additional 209,520 tons and at a crush price of $2.50 would generate an additional $523,800 in revenue for an incremental profit of $223,800. If you look at an entire crushing system or spread, spending an additional $500,000 or more may be the best decision.

Lets look at spending over four fold the dollars on advanced screen media vs. plain wire screen cloth. The best advanced screen media products double the wear life than even the best woven wire screen cloth and in our experience give you at least 10% increase in production

Doesnt look like much does it? What if we could sell those 16 days of production? If we could, the gain in revenue is $99,000 and with incremental costs of $33,375. How could you spend another $65,625 per year? To top it off, you have 30 less hours of downtime in a year to change screen media, adding another $20,650 in revenue! A total gain of $86,275 annually.

Its time to change the thinking about price being the greatest consideration in purchasing decisions in your crushing operation. Price is insignificant in calculating total cost when you look at both uptime and productivity.

What can you do? Share this thinking with your employees and co-workers. If you want what comes with a more successful operation start to think in terms of uptime and productivity in everything you do that surrounds crushing.

Understanding that purchase price and actual cost are two very different considerations, is one of the Five Characteristics of Successful Crusher Operators and Owners discussed in our downloadable article. Click the button below to learn more.

symons cone crusher

symons cone crusher

For finer crushing or reduction a Symonscone crusher the norm. Symons are commonly used for secondary, tertiary or quaternary crushing. They do this by a different chamber design which is flatter and by operating at about twice the rotational speed of a primary type gyratory crusher.

One of the first cone crushers had a direct drive vertical motor mounted above the spider with the drive shaft passing through the hollow bored main shaft. With relatively high speeds of 480 to 580 rpm and small eccentric throw, the machine produced a uniform produce with minimum fines.There are numerous Symonscone crusher manufacturers of modern crushers each promoting some unique aspect.

The Allis Chalmers Hydrocone selling point is its adjustability and tramp protection through a hydraulic support system for the headcentre. By merely adjusting the oil reservoir below the head centre the crusher setting can be changed while in full operation. Tramp metal causes a surge of pressure in this hydraulic system which is absorbed through relief valves and gas-bladder-filled accumulator bottles which allow the headcentre to momentarily drop and return to its normal operating position when the tramp has fallen through.

The Symons or Rexnord spring cone crusher is adjusted by spinning the bowl up or down manually or through hydraulic rams. A series of powerful springs give the necessary tramp protection. Several other manufacturers produce similar types and sizes of crushers but all follow the basic types described.

When the Symons brothers Invented the cone crusher, they employed the principle wherein the length of the crushing stroke was related to the free fall of material by gravity. This permitted the material being crushed to fall vertically in the crushing chamber; and in effect, caused the particles to be crushed in a series of steps or stages as the particles got smaller due to the crushing action. This also helps to reduce the rate of wear of the liners since the sliding motion of the particles is minimized.

Recognizing that the Symons principle of crushing is the most efficient means of ore and aggregate reduction in hard rock applications, the engineers used this same principle in the design on the hydrocone.

Versatility in the form of having the ability to perform in a wide range of applications without the need for a change in major assemblies was another objective in the design. Ease of maintenance and remote setting capability also were part of the design parameters the market requires.

There is no startling revelation to the fact that the mining industry as a whole is generally moving toward the use of larger equipment to process ores in quantities far greater than what was even considered a decade ago. Trucks and shovels have led the way in extra large machines and many other manufacturers have followed suit in the development of so-called supers in their line of equipment.

In order to keep pace with the industry, crusher manufacturers have also enlarged the size of their equipment. There is now on the market, a Gyratory crusher capable of accepting a 72 diameter piece of ore. Primary jaw crushers have also increased in size. It is inevitable, therefore, that larger secondary cone crushers would also be required to complement the other equipment used to process these large quantities of ore. This super-size secondary cone crusher is the SYMONS 10 Ft. Cone Crusher.

Until 1973, the largest cone crusher built was the 7 Ft. Extra Heavy Duty crusher, which is currently used in the majority of the mining operations throughout the world. The 10 Ft. crusher, when compared to the 7 Ft. Extra Heavy Duty Crusher, is approximately 1 times larger in physical dimensions; three times heavier; will accept a maximum feed size which is approximately twice as large; and will crush at approximately 2 times the rate of the 7 Ft. machine at identical closed side settings. It will be the largest cone crusher built in the world.

The conclusions of this investigation were all positive the crusher could be built and at a cost that would be in line with its size and capacity and also with other size crushers. After that preliminary study, the project became dormant for several years.

The project was reactivated and this time general assembly drawings were made which incorporated many improvements in the crusher such as pneumatic cylinders in place of the conventional, springs for tramp iron release, a two-piece main frame a dynamically balanced design of the internal moving parts of the crusher, and an automatic clearing and adjusting mechanism for the crusher. At this stage of development we felt we were ready to build a 10 Ft. crusher for any mine that was willing to try one. Unfortunately, the conservative posture of the mining industry did not exactly coincide with our sales plans. This, added to the popularity of the autogenous mill concept at the time, led to another lull in the 10 Ft. development program.

The project was reactivated again in 1970, this time primarily at the request of one of the large Minnesota Iron Range mining companies. We then undertook a comprehensive market research study to determine if there was a need for this size crusher by the mining industry in general, rather than just the iron ore industry. We talked not only to the iron ore people but to the copper people and persons connected with the other metallic ores as well. The acceptability of this large crusher was also discussed with the aggregate industry. After interviews with many of the major mining companies, the decision was made to complete the entire engineering phase of the development program and to actively solicit a customer for this new crusher. We spent approximately $85,000 on engineering work and tests on the gamble that we could find a customer. I speak of a gamble because during our market research study we continually were told my company would be very interested in buying a 10 Ft. crusher, but only after we have seen one in operation.

The actual building and test of the first prototype unit without a firm commitment for a sale was an economic impossibility. We were now at the point where we needed to sell at least one unit in order to prove not only the mechanical reliability of the machine, but the economic justification for its purchase as well. Needless to say, when the order for two SYMONS 10 Ft. cone crushers was received, we felt we were now on the way toward completion of the development program.

Perhaps at this point it might be apropos to examine the crusher itself. It will stand 15-6 above its foundation, the overall height will be 19-4-. At its greatest diameter, in the area of the adjustment ring, it will be approximately 17-6. It will weigh approximately 550,000 lbs. Under normal crushing conditions, the crusher will be connected to a 700 HP motor. A 50 ton. overhead crane is required to perform routine maintenance on this crusher.

The main shaft assembly will weigh approximately 92,000 lbs. and the bowl assembly approximately 95,000 lbs. The mantle and bowl liner, cast from manganese steel, will weigh approximately 13,000 lbs. and 25,000 lbs. respectively.

The throughput capacity of the Standard will be approximately 1300 TPH at a 1 closed side setting and 3000 TPH at a 2- closed side setting. The throughput capacity of the SHORT HEAD will be approximately 800 TPH at closed side setting and 1450 TPH at a 9/16 closed side setting.

Persons familiar with the design of a conventional 7 Ft. SYMONS cone crusher will recognize that the design of the 10 Ft. is quite similar to it. As a matter of fact, we like to say that the design of the 10 Ft. is evolutionary rather than revolutionary, because all the reliable features of the SYMONS cone crusher were retained and the only changes that were made were those that added to the convenience of the operator, such as automatic clearing and automatic adjustment. From a mechanical point of view the stresses generated due to crushing loads are less in the 10 Ft. crusher than in the existing 7 Ft. Extra Heavy Duty cone.

One of our senior engineers who has long since retired told me that he had the occasion many years ago to make a presentation of a newly designed crusher to a prospective customer. He carefully prepared a rather detailed description of the crusher which included all the features that his new machine had when compared to the customers existing machine. The presentation itself took about one hour and after that period the customer leaned back in his chair and said, Thats all well and good, but will it crush rock? In effect, the customer was; saying that all the features in the world were of no use to him if the crusher did not perform its basic function to crush rock and ultimately make profits for the owner. Using todays financial terminology he was asking the engineer to economically cost justify the purchase of the crusher.

The working day of the contemporary manager or project engineer evolves around making decisions to economically justify a piece of equipment or a new operation. In our development program of the 10 Ft. cone crusher, we felt that the economic justification, from the customers point of view, was just as important to develop as the engineering aspects of the program. So we developed a three-part program to examine the economics of installing a 10 Ft. crusher. First we talked in wide generalities concerning the use of a 10 Ft. crusher. Secondly, we discussed the ramifications of using a 10 Ft. crusher versus 7 Ft. crushers in a completely new plant being considered for the future. Thirdly, we examined how a 10 Ft. crusher could be used to its best advantage in a plant that is being expanded.

The first consideration was the economic generalities of installing the crusher, or more specifically, what questions regarding the installation are pertinent to every crushing plant. Usually, the initial comparison which is made between a 7 Ft. crusher and a 10 Ft. crusher is that of price versus capacity. Theoretically, the capacity of a 10 Ft. crusher is 2 times that of a 7 Ft. while the selling price is approximately 3 times that of the 7 Ft. On that basis alone, it would appear that the 10 Ft. could not be justified. However, this is an incomplete picture. Recent cost estimates show that considerable savings are realized when the entire physical plant structure is considered. Because fewer machines are required to crush an equivalent amount of ore, the size of the buildings can be reduced, thereby decreasing the capital investment of buildings and allied equipment used as auxiliaries for the crusher.

Total manpower requirements to operate and maintain the plant is another of the generalities which were considered. Fewer crushers normally require less personnel to operate and perform maintenance, Manpower requirements obviously play a large part in the profitability of a plant. Therefore, it follows that using a 10 Ft. in place of multiple 7 Ft. units should be more profitable from the standpoint of manpower. We should, however, clarify one point regarding normal maintenance of the 10 Ft. crusher which is commonly misunderstood; namely, the periodic changeout of manganese liners in the crusher. The normal time period between manganese changes would not be significantly different between the 7 Ft. and a 10 Ft. because the wear rate, that is, the pounds of liner worn away per ton of ore crushed, will remain the same. Consequently, if a set of liners in a 7 Ft. crusher, lasted six weeks, a 10 Ft. crusher in the same operation would also last approximately six weeks. However, since the total amount of ore crushed will be greater, the maintenance costs per liner changeout will be less on the 10 Ft. crusher.

Another point for consideration is that the 10 Ft., cone crusher is a secondary crusher and normally would be fed with the product of a gyratory crusher. Since the 10 Ft. can accept a larger feed than a 7 Ft. crusher, it is possible to increase the open side setting of a gyratory crusher, thereby, allowing a greater volume of feed to pass through the crusher. Because of this, it is conceivable that a smaller primary crusher could be used in order to obtain a given quantity of ore.

A good salesman could expound on a multitude of ideas for using 10 Ft. crushers in place of 7 Ft. crushers in a new plant, but in the final analysis, the deciding factor as to whether or not the 10 Ft. crushers should be used will be the anticipated over-all plant capacity. Several studies have indicated that as a general rule of thumb the break even point for using 10 Ft. crushers in place of 7 Ft. crushers is a plant which will have an overall ore treatment capacity of approximately 40,000 TPD or approximately 8,000,000 TPY. Anything less than that figure should indicate the use of conventional 7 Ft. crushers. Obviously a small four stage crushing plant in which the third stage crusher was a 7 Ft. Standard and the fourth stage consisted of two 7 Ft. SHORT HEAD cone crushers, would not improve economically by the use of one 10 Ft. Standard cone crusher and one 10 Ft. SHORT HEAD cone crusher in place of the 7 Ft. crushers.

A study was made which considered a plant to be built using three different approaches of a conventional crushing-grinding operation. The plant which was being considered would be crushing taconite similar to that found in the Iron Range. The end product of the crushing was 5/8 rod mill feed and in this example the plant capacity was to be approximately 13.5 million TPY of ore processed to eventually produce approximately 4 million TPY of iron ore pellets. The study arbitrarily chose a four-year period of operation so that operating costs would be included and also because a four-year period is the usual comparison basis for calculating return on investment. In this example the primary crusher as well as the fine crushing plant would be operated fourteen shifts per week.

In our economic analysis of the 10 Ft. crusher development program, we also studied how this crusher could be used to best advantage when planning expansion of an existing plant. Before delving into the actual dollars and cents of several variations of expansion plans, several preliminary questions must be answered in the affirmative:

Since each plant is unique, the relative merits of the 10 Ft. crusher must be examined on an individual plant basis. Again, as a general rule of thumb, it has been found that the most benefit can be achieved in those plants which presently contain a four-stage crushing plant in which the first two stages of crushing are gyratory crushers. Studies have shown that converting the second stage gyratory crusher to a 10 Ft. Standard crusher shows most potential because the major auxiliaries required for the crusher, such as crane, conveyors, etc., are already large enough to accommodate the increased capacity of the 10 Ft.

As one possible solution, we suggested that the two 30 x 70 secondary gyratory crushers be replaced by two 10 Ft. Standard cones. These crushers could then send approximately 3600 TPH of minus 3 material to the fine crushing plant. The two existing 7 Ft. Standard crushers could be converted easily to SHORT HEAD crushers and two new 7 Ft. SHORT HEAD crushers added to the existing vacant foundations.

In Summary, we feel that the Symons cone crusher has a very definite place in the future of the mining industry and we intend to move steadily ahead with its progress. However, we have learned a few lessons along the way.

Initially, the development of these super size machines is an extremely expensive proposition. We know that if our company alone, attempted to completely design, manufacture, erect, and test a machine in this size range, it would severely tax our financial resources.

We found that super size equipment also presents some problems for our manufacturing facilities. The manufacture of one of these units puts a large dent into the production schedule of many of the smaller conventional units. In our enthusiasm to build a bigger newer machine, we continually remind ourselves that the smaller conventional units are still our bread and butter units.

On the positive side, we found that our reputation as a crusher manufacturer was enhanced because of what our customers refer to as progressive thinking. We listened to the suggestions of the mining industry in attempting to give them what they wanted.

Perhaps you will allow me to close with a bit of philosophizing from a manufacturers point of view. The 10 Ft. crusher is here ready to go into operation. Where do we go from here? A 15 Ft. cone crusher? A 20 Ft. cone crusher? Who knows? We do know that we have reached the financial limit of a development program on a machine of this size. We also know that as the size of a machine grows larger, the developmental and manufacturing risks grow larger along with it and any allowable margin for error must be minimized. We, like you, are in business to make a profit. Since larger crushers usually mean a fewer number of crushers, we must examine the profit picture from aspects of the sale. I think I speak for other manufacturers as well when I say that bigness in machines reflects bigness in development costs as well. If the mining industry wants still larger equipment in the future, the industry should prepare itself to contribute to the development program of those machines.

A multi-cylinderHydraulic Cone Crusher, theHydrocone Cone Crushercan be used in either the second or third stage of crushing by merely changing liners and adaptors.It can produce the full product range that the combination of a comparable sized Standard and Short Head can produce. It makes the machine much more versatile. It allows for much more standardization. The value of this feature is one where spare parts investment in the form of major assemblies is minimized.

All operator controls are conveniently mounted on a remote control console to eliminate the need for an operator to approach the crusher during operation.Over a period of years we have developed a unique engineering knowledge about the effects of cone crusher design parameters such as speed, throw and cavity design on crusher productivity.

Each Hydrocone Cone Crusher features dual function hydraulic cylinders that provide overload protection and a safe and fast way to clear a jammed cavity. Should the crusher become plugged, the operator merely pushes levers on the remote control console to clear the cavity.

It can produce the full product range that the combination of a comparable sized Standard and Short Head can produce. It makes the machine much more versatile. It allows for much more standardization. The value of this feature is one where spare parts investment in the form of major assemblies is minimized.

All operator controls are conveniently mounted on a remote control console to eliminate the need for an operator to approach the crusher during operation.Over a period of years we have developed a unique engineering knowledge about the effects of cone crusher design parameters such as speed, throw and cavity design on crusher productivity.

Each Hydrocone Cone Crusher features dual function hydraulic cylinders that provide overload protection and a safe and fast way to clear a jammed cavity. Should the crusher become plugged, the operator merely pushes levers on the remote control console to clear the cavity.

TheHydraulic Cone Crusheruses hydraulic tramp release cylinders and accumulators to hold the adjustment ring against the main frame seat. There is only one angular surface between the main frame and the adjustment ring which also has a radial contact point in the lowermost area. When a piece of tramp goes through the crusher, the oil is forced into the accumulators allowing the adjustment ring to raise and pass the tramp.

The tramp release cylinders are secured to the adjustment ring and the lower portion of the main frame through clevises. This allows the crushing forces to be transferred directly from the frame arm locations to the adjustment ring. This relieves the main frame shell and upper flange from carrying heavy loads.

The Hydraulic Cone Crusher is equipped with hydraulic clearing. The tramp release cylinders which hold the adjustment ring in place are double acting cylinders. These cylinders can be pressurized in the opposite direction, after the clamping pressure has been released, to raise the adjustment ring and bowl assembly for clearing; only the weight of the adjustment ring, clamp ring, and bowl assembly, plus any residual material in the bowl hopper raises.

rock crushers

rock crushers

The size requirement of the primary rock crusher is a function of grizzly openings, ore chute configuration, required throughput, ore moisture, and other factors. Usually, primary crushers are sized by the ability to accept the largest expected ore fragment. Jaw crushers are usually preferred as primary crushers in small installations due to the inherent mechanical simplicity and ease of operation of these machines. Additionally, jaw crushers wearing parts are relatively uncomplicated castings and tend to cost less per unit weight of metal than more complicated gyratory crusher castings. The primary crusher must be designed so that adequate surge capacity is present beneath the crusher. An ore stockpile after primary crushing is desirable but is not always possible to include in a compact design.

Many times the single heaviest equipment item in the entire plant is the primary crusher mainframe. The ability to transport the crusher main frame sometimes limits crusher size, particularly in remote locations having limited accessibility.

In a smaller installation, the crushing plant should be designed with the minimum number of required equipment items. Usually, a crushing plant that can process 1000s of metric tons per operating day will consist of a single primary crusher, a single screen, a single secondary cone crusher, and associated conveyor belts. The discharge from both primary and secondary crushers is directed to the screen. Screen oversize serves as feed to the secondary crusher while screen undersize is the finished product. For throughputs of 500 to 1,000 metric tons per operating day (usually 2 shifts), a closed circuit tertiary cone crusher is usually added to the crushing circuit outlined above. This approach, with the addition of a duplicate screen associated with the tertiary cone crusher, has proven to be effective even on ores having relatively high moisture contents. Provided screen decks are correctly selected, the moist fine material in the incoming ore tends to be removed in the screening stages and therefore does not enter into subsequent crushing units.

All crusher cavities and major ore transfer points should be equipped with a jib-type crane or hydraulic rock tongs to facilitate the removal of chokes. In addition, secondary crushers must be protected from tramp iron by suspended magnets or magnetic head pulleys. The location of these magnets should be such that recycling of magnetic material back into the system is not possible.

Crushing plants for the tonnages indicated may be considered to be standardized. It is not prudent to spend money researching crusher abrasion indices or determining operating kilowatt consumptions for the required particle size reduction in a proposed small crushing plant. Crushing installations usually are operated to produce the required mill tonnage at a specified size distribution under conditions of varying ore hardness by the variation of the number of operating hours per day. It is normal practice to generously size a small crushing plant so that the daily design crushing tonnage can be produced in one, or at most two, operating shifts per working day.

avoid unplanned downtime: 5 crusher maintenance best practices

avoid unplanned downtime: 5 crusher maintenance best practices

According to leading aggregate producers, repairs and maintenance labor average 30 to 35 percent of direct operating costs, says Erik Schmidt, ResourceDevelopment Manager, Johnson Crushers International, Inc. Thats a pretty large factor towards the overhead of that equipment.

There are three approaches to maintenance: reactive, preventative and predictive. Reactive is repairing something that has failed. Preventative maintenance is often viewed as unnecessary but minimizes downtime because the machine is getting repaired before failure. Predictive means using historical service life data to determine when a machine will likely breakdown and then taking the necessary steps to address the problem before failure occurs.

According to Schmidt: 75 percent of companies are operating in the run until its broke mentality. Maintenance is sacrificed. As a result of that, the costs are high when you have unplanned down time due to equipment failure, he says. It can lead to loss of production, ancillary or consequential damages, expedited freight costs for parts, loss of production, and even low morale.

According to Schmidt, daily visual inspections will catch a vast majority of impending failures that could be costing operations in unnecessary and preventable down time. That is why it is number one on my list of tips for crusher maintenance, says Schmidt.

The lack of daily inspections is going on a lot more than people would like to admit, says Schmidt. If you get into the crushing chamber every day and look for blockage, material build up and wear, you can prevent failures from occurring by identifying future problems today. And, if you are operating in really wet, sticky, or clay material, you might find that you need to get in there more than once a day.

Visual inspections are crucial. In the scenario where the conveyor underneath a cone crusher stalls, the material will build up inside the crushing chamber and eventually stall the crusher. Material can stay stuck inside that cannot be seen.

No one crawls inside there to see that it is still blocked inside the cone, says Schmit. Then, once they get the discharge conveyor going again, they start the crusher. Thats the absolute wrong thing to do. Lock out and tag out, then get in there and look, because material can easily block off chambers, causing excessive wear and even sub-sequential damage to the anti-spin mechanism or related internal components.

In cone crushers, one common form of abuse is bowl float. Also called ring bounce or upper frame movement. It is the machines relief system that is designed to allow uncrushables to pass through the machine, but if youre continually overcoming relief pressures due to the application, that is going to cause damage at the seat and other internal components. Its a sign of abuse and the end result is expensive down time and repairs, says Schmidt.

To avoid bowl float, Schmidt recommends you check the feed material going into the crusher but keep the crusher choke fed. You might have too many fines going into the crusher, which means you have a screening problemnot a crushing problem, he says. Also, you want to choke feed the crusher to get maximum production rates and a 360-degree crush. Dont trickle feed the crusher; that will lead to uneven component wear, more irregular product sizes and less production. An inexperienced operator will often reduce the feed rate rather than to simply open the close side setting.

For HSI, Schmidt recommends providing well-graded input feed to the crusher, because this will maximize production while minimizing costs, and to properly prep the feed when crushing recycled concrete with steel, because this will reduce plugging in the chamber and blow bar breakage. Failure to take certain precautions when using equipment is abusive.

Always use the fluids prescribed by the manufacturer and check with their guidelines if you plan on using something other than what is specified. Be careful when changing viscosities of oil. Doing so will also change the extreme pressure (EP) rating of the oil, and may not perform the same in your machine, says Schmidt.

Contaminants such as dirt and water can also get into fuel, either while in storage or when filling the machine. Gone are the days of the open bucket, says Schmidt. Now, all fluids need to be kept clean, and a lot more caution is taken to avoid contamination.

Tier 3 and Tier 4 engines use a high-pressure injection system and, if any dirt gets into the system, and youve wiped it out. You will end up replacing the machines injection pumps and possibly all other fuel-rail components in the system, says Schmidt.

According to Schmidt, misapplication leads to a lot of repairs and failures. Look at whats going in and what youre expecting out of it. What is the top-sized feed material going into the machine and the machines closed side setting? That gives you the machines reduction ratio, explains Schmidt.

If you exceed what an HSI or cone crusher is designed to do within its configuration, you can expect to decrease the lifespan of certain components, because you are putting stresses on parts of the machine that werent designed to bear that stress.

Misapplication can lead to uneven liner wear. If the crusher is wearing low in the chamber or high in the chamber, you are going to get pockets or a hook, and its going to cause overload, either high amp draw or bowl floating. This will have a negative effect on performance and cause long-term damage to componentry.

Knowing a machines normal or average operating conditions is integral to monitoringmachine health. After all, you cant know when a machine is working outside of normal or average operating conditions unless you know what those conditions are.

If you keep a log book, long-term operating performance data will create a trend and any data that is an outlier to that trend could be an indicator that something is wrong, says Schmidt. You may be able to predict when a machine is going to fail.

Once you have logged enough data, you will be able to see trends in the data. Once you become aware of the trends, actions can be taken to make sure they dont create unplanned down time. What is your machines coast down times? asks Schmidt. How long does it take before the crusher comes to a stop after you push the stop button? Normally, it takes 72 seconds, for example; today it took 20 seconds. Whats that telling you?

By monitoring these and other potential indicators of machine health, you can identify problems earlier, before the equipment fails while in production, and the servicing can be scheduled for a time that will cost you little downtime. Benchmarking is key in executing predictive maintenance.

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