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where to buy stevenson screen in mizoram

ele international - stevenson screen

ele international - stevenson screen

The Stevenson screen is designed to hold maximum and minimum thermometers, and a wet-and-dry bulb hygrometer. It is available either in the finished form, ready for use, or more cheaply as a make-it-yourself kit. Both are suitable for use in all climates.The screen is made from top quality seasoned wood, with double-louvred sides, a double layer roof, and a floor of overlapping boards separated vertically by an airspace. The front panel is hinged at the bottom to form a door, and is retained in the horizontal position by two chains; it may be padlocked shut.

single stevenson screen at rs 26500/piece | stevenson screen | id: 2361407948

single stevenson screen at rs 26500/piece | stevenson screen | id: 2361407948

A Stevenson screen or instrument shelter is a shelter or an enclosure to meteorological instruments against precipitation and direct heat radiation from outside sources, while still allowing air to circulate freely around them. It forms part of a standard weather station.

Nunes Instruments, is in the field of InstrumentationSales Service & Repairswith40 yearsof experience.We provide service & repairs to your old high precision instruments and equipment. We provide cost effective service& Repair toany brand, any makeinstruments with service warranty.Why not try once?Instruments of Any Type, Any Make, Analog/Digital, Any Condition Indianor Imported

stevenson instrument screen - fairmount weather systems

stevenson instrument screen - fairmount weather systems

The Fairmount Stevenson Screen was initially designed to house Manual Hygrometers.However, since the Minamata Conventions Global Treaty tophase-out of mercury by 2020, Hygrometers are now being replaced with non-mercury equivalents, with Intellisense being the direct replacement, both within Stevenson Screens and also as soil thermometers.

stevenson screen - weather station - instructables

stevenson screen - weather station - instructables

This is my project to build a Stevenson screen. I use temperature readings a lot in my projects (please take a look at www.flowrc.co.uk) and I noticed that the readings were really influenced by direct sunlight etc. So, I needed to get a more standardised reading and the answer is a Stevenson screen. I looked at the prices of a ready-made one and quickly decided to make my own. The hardest part seemed to be building the louvered sides. I found some gas vents in a DIY store that looked perfect. The size of the vents dicates the size of the screen and hence it is not strictly a standard Stevenson screen.

A Stevenson screen or instrument shelter is an enclosure to shield meteorological instruments against precipitation and direct heat radiation from outside sources, while still allowing air to circulate freely around them. It forms part of a standard weather station. The Stevenson screen holds instruments that may include thermometers (ordinary, maximum/minimum), a hygrometer, a psychrometer, a dew-cell, a barometer and a thermograph. Stevenson screens may also be known as a cotton region shelter, an instrument shelter, a thermometer shelter, a thermoscreen or a thermometer screen. Its purpose is to provide a standardised environment...

I traced around the top and bottom of the cube to get the sections of plywood the right size. These were then pinned to the frame. It might be best not to secure them until after painting as painting inside the box after was a little tricky.

Having just completed the building of a Stevenson box, I've encountered a few problems which may be of some interest or help to others building their own box.I used single plastic vents and I believe that there may be a heat radiation problem from the vents during low elevation direct sunlight, thus warming the air inside the box slightly. I've increased the roof ventilation to "hopefully" create a ventri stack effect by using 4" PVC with a T at the top leading to elbows angled downward at ~35 degrees (to help prevent rain from entering).I've covered the top with white tin cladding to reflect the sun and help keep the box relatively maintenance free and roof water from entering. Under the tin covering, I have 1 inch rigid styrofoam insulation to help prevent heat being transferred from the metal roof into the box.At this writing, I've not yet checked my modifications to see if they are effective in preventing the interior from heating beyond the outside temperature in direct low elevation sunlight. If this fails, I may change my venting (at least on the sun facing sides) to wooden vents to see if that solves any heating problem which may occur.For what it's worth...

If you're going to feed your temperature readings to a weather service, a home-built weather station would need to be carefully vetted and tested against one built in the traditional way. The original Stevenson screens were made of wood, painted white and were in use for more than a century. Some stations have recently been set up with vinyl Stevenson screens, and it is not clear if their performance is identical to the original wood screens. There is a suspicion that part of the "global warming" phenomenon may not be real and may be due to differences in materials used in thermometer housings. If you're building this screen for your own use, though, it will most likely to the trick for gathering consistent local relative readings.

This is an official government issue Stevenson screen and you are correct, they do indeed have double louvers, that helps to prevent radiant heat from the ground influencing temperature reading. The author's design could easily be modified to achieve this by placing two gas vents back to back on each side

Mindmapper1 - thanks for leaving a note. My intention was to make something that was a simple as possible but also functional - hence the idea of using standard gas vents. If you come up with some design improvements that please let me know and post a picture!

stevenson screen - stevenson screens suppliers, stevenson screen manufacturers & wholesalers

stevenson screen - stevenson screens suppliers, stevenson screen manufacturers & wholesalers

The best choice for housing thermograph, hydrograph, dries and wet bulb, thermometer and maximum-minimum thermometer, our Stevenson Screens are manufactured as per IS: 5948:1970 standards. The company is enlisted among the reliable Manufacturers and Suppliers of Stevenson Screens more...

We are engaged in offering Stevenson Screen as per the IS: 5948:1970. These screens are basically manufactured from best quality Indian wood and accurately assembled with side louvers. Customers can avail these screens at the most cost-effective prices. Available in two sizes : S more...

These screens are manufactured as per IS:5948:1970 and are suitable for housing thermograph, hydrograph, dry and wet bulb, Thermometer and Maximum-Minimum Thermometer. Basically these are manufactured from best quality Indian wood and accurately assembled with side louvers and su more...

These screens are manufactured as per IS:5948:1970 and are suitable for housing thermograph, hydrograph, dry and wet bulb, Thermometer and Maximum-Minimum Thermometer. Basically these are manufactured from best quality Indian wood and accurately assembled with side louvers and su more...

These Stevenson screens are manufactured as per IS:5948:1970 and are suitable for housing thermograph, hydrograph, dry and wet bulb, Thermometer and Maximum-Minimum Thermometer. Basically these are manufactured from best quality Indian wood and accurately assembled with s more...

We are widely appreciated for offering commendable Double Stevenson Screen . Designed to excellence, Double Stevenson Screen efficiently protects meteorological instrument from sunlight and other environmental factors. We offer Double Stevenson Screen in different specification i more...

We are offering stevenson screen. These screens are manufactured as per is:5948:1970 and are suitable for housing thermograph, hydrograph, dry and wet bulb, thermometer and maximum-minimum thermometer. Basically these are manufactured from best quality indian wood and accurately more...

These screens are manufactured as per IS:5948:1970 and are suitable for housing thermograph, hydrograph, dry and wet bulb, Thermometer and Maximum-Minimum Thermometer. Basically these are manufactured from best quality Indian wood and accurately assembled with side louvers and su more...

The Stevenson Screen , which we offer to the clients, is fabricated using sophisticated machines and latest techniques. The Stevenson Screen is designed to withstand extreme conditions. The Stevenson Screen, provided by us, is available in different specifications to cater to the more...

Backed by advanced technology, we are able to bring forth innovative Single Stevenson Screen . Designed to excellence, Single Stevenson Screen ensures complete protection of meteorological instrument from different weather conditions. Our Single Stevenson Screen is widely appreci more...

a diy stevenson screen - diy astronomer - stargazers lounge

a diy stevenson screen - diy astronomer - stargazers lounge

Now the observatory is up and running my mind has turned to wiring up my weather station kit again and getting it all working as I can now connect it all to the PC in the observatory and have some records of conditions when I've been observing/imaging. I dismantled everything some time back when my last bodged-together screen gave up the ghost, so this time I thought I'd do a bit better job though most of the materials will be stuff I have sitting around the place.

Initially I had considered 3D printing the louvred sides, but I discovered that Screwfix sell vents about 200mm square with built-in insect screens (I'm not desperately keen on it becoming a home for bees/wasps/hornets) for about 1.40 each and anything else looked rather too much effort at that point, so I bought four of them, one for each side and two for the door:

A hunt about in the stack of wood "that may come in useful one day" turned up some 30mm square softwood, a bit of T&G and a few offcuts of ply and I also found some galvanised mesh I could use for a floor, so I set to with the tools and made up a box and frame for the door:

The next steps are to make up a second roof (apparently a second roof with an air gap underneath is desirable, presumably to reduce the effect of the Sun) and to paint everything so I can finish assembling it all. I was contemplating covering the second roof with an offcut of EPDM, but I'm not sure at the moment. It might well defeat the object of having a second roof in the first place. On the other hand, this will be going on the north east wall of the observatory, so shouldn't really get any significant heating from the Sun anyhow.

Progress is slow, largely due to the colder weather meaning paint drying times have increased, but also I was waiting for some stainless screws to arrive. Today however I fitted the door and all the

Now the observatory is up and running my mind has turned to wiring up my weather station kit again and getting it all working as I can now connect it all to the PC in the observatory and have some rec

This week I have completed the painting and finished fitting the roof. I also nipped into Screwfix on the way to a meeting at school and picked up some elbows and clips for the 20mm conduit that I fo

Mine is going to be electronic too, but I want enough space inside to be able to get my hands in and fiddle about with stuff, especially as I might also use it as the main connection point for external sensors such as a rain gauge, anemometer and perhaps a sky quality meter.

The painting I did yesterday didn't feel particularly dry today (perhaps not surprising given the temperatures), so I thought I'd dig out some of my old 1-wire kit and have a tinker this evening. What a bundle of joy that has been!

First I found that my 1-wire hub wouldn't power up. It looks as though the 15V PSU has died. I reckon I might be able to feed it from the 12V supply for the observatory though, so perhaps all is not yet lost (or at least waiting for me to buy another PSU) there.

I downloaded the last release of OWW, the software I used using to read the 1-wire devices and just couldn't get it to build properly. After a lot of faffing about I tried the previous version and that seems to be fine.

The next step was to plug in the 1-wire controller device and a few sensors and see what happened. Well, nothing much happened at all because it seems the way the controller interfaces with Linux has been completely changed in the intervening years and OWW can't find any of the devices.

I discovered that I might need to load some additional driver modules to get the devices to be recognised, so I tested with a few of those. I've crashed my desktop twice so far (the first time I've managed that in years).

I didn't have a lot more time left last night, but out of lack of other ideas tried it out on an RPi where it seems to work much more reliably. I wonder if the drivers aren't stable on 64-bit environments or something like that. As I was quite probably going to end up with an RPi in the screen anyhow, that may not be the end of the world and it does have the advantage that all the 1-wire cabling can be short.

However, I think I might be able to get it to work a different way on my desktop and laptop if I blacklist the standard 1-wire drivers. It looks as though OWW can talk to the USB device directly and control everything from there.

After blacklisting all the 1-wire modules on my desktop and making a udev rules script that allows non-root users access to the USB device, I've plugged in the circuit board of my AAG weather station, a pressure sensor and a combined solar/temperature sensor and fired up oww. It lives, Igor!

The software is whining about an error reading the wind direction ADC, but I think that's because I dismantled the weather station so I could remove one of the 6P6C plugs (the entire unit was blown down in a storm a few years back and the cable tore out of the plug) and replace it. I've not reassembled it yet. I'm actually half-tempted to try to 3d print an entire new housing as the original has somewhat degraded in the sunlight.

Getting this bit of software working is actually more than I need in fact. There's a non-GUI version that can just log the data to a database which means it can be pulled out to be used however I want.

Progress is slow, largely due to the colder weather meaning paint drying times have increased, but also I was waiting for some stainless screws to arrive. Today however I fitted the door and all the vents.

The upper roof section is also in progress, but I'm quite tempted to try to fit this in position tomorrow anyhow and fit the additional roof section when it is ready (probably next weekend). It's not like it needs much protection from the Sun at the moment, after all. I just need to add two or three rails across the back so I can fix sensors etc. in place.

This week I have completed the painting and finished fitting the roof. I also nipped into Screwfix on the way to a meeting at school and picked up some elbows and clips for the 20mm conduit that I found stashed in the ceiling of the workshop.

Today I fitted the screen to the north-east wall of the warm room and ran three cat5e cables (one 1-wire, one ethernet, one spare) and a 12V power connection through the conduit into the warm room, which meant I could plug in the 1-wire hub/power injector and a couple of the 1-wire devices that I've cleaned up since their last outing. They're "casually abandoned" inside the housing for the time being. I'll fit them more neatly when I have the other devices ready to go.

The computer end of the 1-wire network is plugged into a DS2490 (I think that's the one) USB interface and I'm working on getting the software side of that up and running at the moment. I also need to work out where and how I'm going to fit the rain gauge and the original AAG weather station that has the anemometer and wind direction meter. (both of which need some repair work first).

Which reminds me... Today I found my copy of a paper documenting the design of a solid-state combined anemometer and wind direction meter using some ultrasonic transceivers and a single-board computer. It was published in 2006, so before the advent of the RPi and Ardiuno, but I imagine either would be suitable these days. In fact I bet someone's already done it. I quite fancy having a go at building one at some point.

That's interesting though I already have a magnetic transducer arranged for the wind vane and simple Hall device for the anemometer. 1-wire instruments connect to an Arduino Uno plus data logging shield which also has the pressure sensor on. It all works basically - I just have to get round to finishing it.

The AAG weather station uses magnets on the end of a spindle to trip reed switches as a means of calculating wind speed (count the number of times the reed switch is tripped per minute, I guess) and direction (eight more reed switches arranged at N, NE, E, SE, S, SW, W, NW). It's actually a bit of a mess now -- I guess UV has taken a bit of a toll on the plastic. It's just occurred to me that I could paint it all gloss white and perhaps get a bit more life out of it whilst I design a replacement to 3D print. The vane for the direction is dead though -- all the actual vane has gone.

I could start work on the painting and whilst that is drying get the rain gauge up and running again. It really requires a new base to allow the water to drain out, but I could 3D print something suitable pretty quickly I reckon. A longer cable would be good, too.

Mine is all home built. The wind vane uses a magnetic field direction sensor in an SMD chip. Measures in degrees - not that it needs anything like that level of accuracy. I must take the thead (assuming I can find it) and convert it to a Blog.

Today I thought I'd take a look at the rain gauge which isn't working. I opened it up and had to drill out one of the screws to get at the electronics as it had rusted too much to come undone. It appears that the unit uses a reed switch that is activated by a magnet on the tipping system that collects the rain:

The battery has clearly expired, so I thought I'd pop it out and replace it, but that's proving a little more awkward than I expected. It seems the battery is somehow welded to the contacts. Not ideal

I could attempt to unsolder the contacts from the PCB, add a new battery holder either on the PCB or on the end of some wires, and then fit a new battery. But that still leaves me having to replace the battery every so often.

Although there are only two wires connecting to the board to connect it to the 1-wire hub, the main cable has four cores and the hub supplies 5V on one of the "spares". I'm wondering if I dare attempt to re-wire it to provide power from that instead of the battery (and whether I actually need to step the voltage down as it might run quite happily on 5V anyhow). Given the amount of hot-melt used it's quite hard to make out what the other components are. Ultimately though I think it uses the same 1-wire counter components as the weather station anemometer (which also works using a reed switch) and that runs off 5V.

I think I have most of my other sensors up and running now. I have owfs running to get the sensor values with a script that displays them every thirty seconds or so. Clearly there's some tweaking to be done. I have four temperature sensors, one in the AAG anemometer, one in the solar sensor, one in the RH sensor and one in the barometer. This is the data I'm seeing:

21:17:22 AAG: -0.19, SOL: 1.62, BAR: 1.54, RH: -0.53 degC, 1024.0 mb, 102.2% RH 21:17:58 AAG: -0.19, SOL: 1.56, BAR: 1.53, RH: -0.62 degC, 1023.9 mb, 102.5% RH 21:18:31 AAG: -0.25, SOL: 1.56, BAR: 1.53, RH: -0.66 degC, 1023.9 mb, 102.7% RH 21:19:07 AAG: -0.19, SOL: 1.56, BAR: 1.52, RH: -0.56 degC, 1023.9 mb, 102.5% RH 21:19:42 AAG: -0.25, SOL: 1.56, BAR: 1.51, RH: -0.53 degC, 1024.0 mb, 102.8% RH

Obviously they can't all be right. As the dew is already freezing, I'm inclined to think that the AAG and RH values are probably nearer the mark. Atmospheric pressure looks about right. Perhaps a little optimisitic, but not too bad. I assume it's telling me that the RH is over 100% because we're below the dew point. I'll have to work that one out. owfs gives me access to the raw data from the sensor so I can recalculate it myself to check.

As mentioned in another thread the RH reading got up to 118% the other day, so I checked the datasheet for the HIH4000 that's inside the RH sensor unit and found that the voltage reading for 100% RH (the HIH4000 outputs a voltage proportional to RH) should be 4.07V with a supply voltage of 5V at 0C (which was very close to the temperature when I checked). Mine was allegedly producing 4.11V from a supply of 4.83V. Using the formula from the datasheet in reverse I think it should have been closer to 3.93V.

So I visited the Bay and bought a new HIH4000 which arrived today. A little work with a soldering iron and some braid removed the old sensor and left nice clean holes to fit the new one which is now back online and reading about 82% RH though it's still rising slightly. Less than two hours ago before I disconnected it the old sensor was reading over 102%! The built-in temperature sensor looks as though it might be more accurate, too. At the moment it's pretty much in agreement with the DS18B20 sensors that I have installed.

to allow me to remount my AAG weather station on a pole and connect it up to the rest of the weather monitoring kit. I had a few niggles printing the second one. It's deliberately quite chunky (because last time I was using it the wind ripped it off the pole in a storm) and takes a while to print. About two thirds of the way through my first attempt we had a power cut I shall be moving the printer to a UPS as soon as it is convenient to do so.

The weather station has sensors for wind direction and speed and also a temperature sensor, though the latter is often inaccurate when the Sun is out because the weather station housing gets warmer than the surroundings so I'll be relying on other temperature sensors inside the screen instead.

After spending much of the afternoon dodging showers I actually have it all mounted up now, though the cabling isn't completely finished because I ran out of daylight having decided to replace the standard cable with UV-stable cat5e. I'm sure I can find time to do that tomorrow -- it should only take ten minutes.

When I set up the Stevenson screen I ran 12V and ethernet to it and I'm now considering putting an RPi inside to run all the instruments rather than using the desktop in the warm room. I have a splitter for the power and one output will continue to power the 1-wire hub as it does now. I'm going to wire the other output into a socket that's intended to replace a cigarette lighter socket and has two USB charging ports on the front. That should power the RPi.

Then I have the rain gauge to get operational again. I've been doing some testing and I think it works ok now, but I'm not completely convinced that it isn't double-counting some bucket tips. I may need to look into that a bit more. I'm also going to replace the original cabling with the same cable I used for the weather station, and make up some kind of spiky edge for the top of the funnel to stop birds perching on the edge and using it as a toilet.

After that I think the last thing I'm going to do is to try to calibrate the RH sensor a bit better. As I posted before, the datasheet suggests that the output voltage at 100% RH should be 4.07V with a 5V supply voltage. The original sensor was way out, but even the replacement manages to get up to 4.11V with a supply voltage of 4.84V so obviously something is not right there.

This morning I sneaked out for a few minutes, drilled the hole and cabled everything up properly. Hopefully now it has a few coats of gloss paint it will last a while before the plastic of the housing finally gives up and I have to build a new one. I don't think these are available any more. At least, last time I checked the company that made them was no longer in business.

When I had the circuit board inside the screen the temperature sensor was reading about 0.3C below the average of the sensors I'm intending to use long-term. Now it's out in full sunlight in the housing despite being on the underside of the circuit board it is reading 1.5C above the average, so it's clearly not to be relied upon.

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stevenson screen

stevenson screen

Having looked around at a number of different weather orientated website, and knowing that the best place for your outdoor sensor is away from objects that can affect the ambient temperature/humidity. The catch is that by having it out in the open, solar radiation (that big yellow thing in the sky) will naturally heat the outer surfaces of the sensor ultimately giving you temperature readings way off the planet, and possibly causing premature failure of the sensor.

To solve this latter problem, a device/compartment that shrouds the sensor is called a Stevenson Screen. These screens are available from a number of sources, however they can be quite pricey for what they basically are, so this is why I decided to build my own.

The saucers that I obtained have a reasonably large lip when inverted. This has the potential of filling with rainwater/condensation that will affect the humidity readings, and to a lesser extent temperature readings.

I chose to fill up these lips with a product called No Gaps , which cleans up in water until fully cured. The problems with this is that if you fill the lips up in one go, it will take days to a week or more to finally cure, which means you can't really paint the saucers until then.

One option is to mostly fill the lips with Silastic (or equivalent), which will cure much faster, and use No Gaps to smooth out the last little bits, which will cure faster due to the much smaller amount of it used.

A alternative to filling these lips would be to drill a number of small holes in the lips to let them drain by themselves. The only problem I can see here is that rubbish can build up inside the lips, detracting from the visual appearance.

I've located it about 1.5 M off the ground as I am led to believe that is the standard height for recognised weather stations. A few sites that I've visited myself have had theirs less than a metre off the roof of their house. It is my opinion that the inherant warmth from the house in the winter months, and the much higher temperatures in the summer months could not be adequately compensated for.

Since this page has been up, there have been many comments and ideas discussed about my screen, and some of which are quite valid. Larger saucer up top to act as further shade for the unit Larger saucers than the 20cm ones I used, such as 30cm Altering the location of the sensor inside the screen Using spacers, such as plastic tubing, or short lengths of electrical conduit instead of nuts and washers

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